2012 Trade Value: #35-#31

#50-#46
#45-#41
#40-#36

Note: salaries are rounded estimates and include all team-controlled years. Rankings from the 2011 Trade Value series in parentheses.

35. (NR) Pablo Sandoval, 3B, San Francisco – Signed through 2014 for $15 million.

Every team in baseball is looking for young hitting, and many of them are wondering where all the third baseman with power went. Sandoval is one of the few good young offensive 3Bs in the game — his career line of .306/.356/.499 is good for a 125 wRC+ — as he doesn’t turn 26 for a few more weeks. He’s had problems staying healthy the last couple of years and the Giants only bought out his arbitration years when they signed him to a three year extension, which drive down his value a bit, but his power and contact skills are rare enough that he’d command a strong return if put on the open market.

34. (4) Dustin Pedroia, 2B, Boston – Signed Through 2015 for $36 million.

Pedroia is yet another example of a guy ranked very highly last year who has tumbled due to injury and performance issues. A couple of thumb injuries have landed Pedroia on the DL and contributed to a miserable performance in June, but his overall performance even before the injuries was down a bit from what we’ve come to expect. Still, signed for two more years plus a team option for a third year at $10 million per season, he’s a massive bargain and he was an elite player last year, so there’s no question that there’s still a lot of value to be had. However, the multiple thumb issues and disappearing power put a bit of a damper on his current value, and any team trading for Pedroia would have to be aware of the fact that they’d be taking him away from the Green Monster, where he’s done most of his damage throughout his career.

33. (NR) Austin Jackson, OF, Detroit Tigers – Under Team Control Through 2015.

Jackson has enjoyed a breakout 2012 season, already matching his career high in home runs and seeing his walk rate spike as well. The addition of power and patience to a player with good speed have made him an all around performer and one of the best center fielders in the game this season. His track record suggests that the power might be in for a decline, but he’s posted an ISO over .200 in each of the first four months with no discernable drop-off, so there’s a case to be made that the new Jackson is simply a large improvement over the old one. His surge is well-timed, as he’ll be heading to arbitration for the first time this winter, and is probably in line for a lucrative extension if the Tigers decide to buy out his arbitration years. Even with a payday coming, however, Jackson’s performance and athleticism make him a guy that teams would be lining up to bid for.

32. (NR) Mark Trumbo, 1B/OF, Anaheim – Under Team Control through 2016.

His lack of plate discipline received a lot of attention during his rookie year, but it may have overshadowed the fact that Trumbo is one of the strongest players in baseball, and he’s got the kind of power that allows him to be productive even while swinging at pitches he should probably let pass. Instead of regressing from his rookie season, Trumbo has been one of the most dynamic offensive players in baseball this year, hitting .311/.361/.634, good for a 165 wRC+. Just 26, Trumbo is one of the premier young power hitters in the sport, and he’s athletic enough to not embarrass himself in the outfield. He’s not a perfect player, but his strengths are notably hard to find in the sport these days, and with four more years of team control, he’s an asset that the Angels aren’t likely to part with.

31. (NR) Chris Sale, SP, Chicago White Sox – Under Team Control through 2016.

Sale’s conversion to the rotation couldn’t have gone any better — that is, unless you take away that whole two week blip where the White Sox were moving him back to the bullpen because his arm hurt before changing their minds. That incident has to raise some concern, but it’s still too hard to ignore what Sale has done as a dominant starting pitcher this year. A 77 xFIP- as a starting pitcher in the AL shows just how good he has been even if you regress his BABIP and HR/FB rates, and the White Sox still have another year where they can pay him peanuts before arbitration even kicks in. The drastic loss in velocity and the whole starter-reliever-starter thing would probably serve as red flags for some team, especially given his slender frame, but he’s pitching at a level where you accept some risk in order to get this kind of performance, especially from a 23-year-old making the league minimum.




Print This Post



Dave is a co-founder of USSMariner.com and contributes to the Wall Street Journal.

91 Responses to “2012 Trade Value: #35-#31”

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
  1. Michael Scarn says:

    I know you said that guys a couple spots apart are more or less interchangable, but I’d have to think that the Tigers would trade Jackson for Pedroia in a heartbeat.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • J6takish says:

      That’s more of an organizational thing, the Tigers have been notoriously shallow at 2b since Polanco left. Austin Jackson is younger, cheaper and on the upswing. He’s a more valuable player at this point

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Michael Scarn says:

        Pedroia is 28, signed to a team friendly deal, and has been the 19th most valuable player in baseball by WAR since 2010.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Stats says:

        Pedroia has also hit twice as many doubles at home than on the road in his career. So the Tigers wouldn’t be getting that Pedroia.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Michael Scarn says:

        So you have a better method of discounting for home park effects than wOBA and wRC+, which already do that and still show that he is excellent. Like you somehow know the amount of doubles that he would produce at Tiger Stadium? And judging by your comment that number would apparently be 0?

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Stats says:

        The last five years, Fenway Park has ranked second, second, first, first, and first in friendliness to doubles, so you could easily say that it is well established as the most doubles friendly park in all of baseball. Here are some career splits for Pedroia:

        Home: 19.8 LD%, 41.7 GB%, 38.6 FB%, 8.0 HR/FB%
        Away: 20.3 LD%, 44.2 GB%, 35.5 FB%, 7.7 HR/FB%

        Home: 9.2 BB%, 8.4 K%
        Away: 9.6 BB%, 8.4 K%

        There is really no difference in his approach or contact rates in either situation. Now, for some results (1599 PA at home, 1602 PA on the road, so fully comparable)

        Singles: 284 at home vs. 289 on the road.
        Doubles: 130 at home vs. 76 on the road.
        Triples: 4 at home vs. 4 on the road
        Home Runs: 40 at home vs. 35 on the road.

        +10 Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Stats says:

        And those stats do not include this year. But as you can see Pedroia literally hits twice as many doubles at Fenway than he does on the road.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul Sporer says:

        Scarn, Pedroia isn’t excellent outside of Fenway. He’s insanely elite at home (132 wRC+) and above average on the road (106). And that’s what he HAS done, he is far from guaranteed to do that going forward even at full health. Either way, I think you’re way off to suggest the Tigers would do it in a heartbeat since I think there is an easy case for them not doing it all.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • mcawesome says:

        I guarantee that the Phillies would trade Polanco back to Detroit for a bag of balls at this point.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Colin says:

        Nice work on those numbers stats. Also people need to keep in mind that park effect adjustments are good ways of doing things on a large scale but that how a particular park affects a particular player can definitely be different.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Paul Sporer says:

      I actually don’t think so, in fact I know it wouldn’t be in a heartbeat. Yes, 2B has been a sore spot, but if you make that trade, now you have the same issue you’ve had at 2B in a more important position of CF. Take the more expensive (albeit not grossly overpaid at all), older (and yes, also deeper track record of excellence) guy in a value trough for your brightest 25 and under star? Nah, I don’t see it.

      Not to mention the value Pedroia derives from Fenway and the fact that 2Bs get really sketchy in their late-20s/early-30s. You’re putting a lot of weight on what Pedroia did in 2010 and 2011, but that’s not who the Tigers would be getting in a deal like that.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Rudy says:

        Not necessarily, QB can easily slide from LF to CF and the defense wouldn’t shutter. However, the last thing the Sox probably want is another OF’er–even though they seem to have every veteran OF’er cast aside by other teams every year. The Tigers also have the talent to fill 2B at AA Erie–his name is Nick Castellanos(3B); yet for some reason, instead of giving him starts and grounders at 2B, they prefer to let him get experience in the OF. If they were smart, they woud move this kid to 2B immediately being that he is eternally blocked by one of the best pure hitters in the game in Miggy.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Ian says:

        1. Quintin Berry is not nearly the defensive player that Jackson is – poor routes, brutal arm, bad glove. Tons of speed helps to mask that, but I don’t want him in CF for the Tigers.
        2. Castellanos does not move well enough to play 2B, or the Tigers would absolutely move him there.
        3. I wouldn’t think the Red Sox would want Jackson for Pedroia, given their OF situation, any more than the Tigers would want Pedroia for Jackson, given Jackson’s surge towards becoming an elite player, contract status, and youth.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  2. Bradsbeard says:

    Hey, Sandoval doesn’t have any more hamate bones to break, so his trade value should definitely be higher now.

    +24 Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Baltar says:

      I gave you a plus for pointing out something that Dave should have mentioned as part of “injury history.”
      However, another thing that Dave should have mentioned, weight concerns, cancels that upgrade with a downgrade.
      I think Dave rated him about right.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  3. TheGrandSlamwich says:

    Trumbo trained with the great Domingo Ayala. He cannot fail.

    +6 Vote -1 Vote +1

  4. BX says:

    So breakout seasons can catapult guys deeply into the middle of the trade value series.

    Intriguing. Very intriguing.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  5. TKDC says:

    Does a guy like Trumbo, who hits for power and drives in more runs but doesn’t walk, which is rewarded highly in arbitration, have lower trade value than a defense first player with a high OBP but little power? Or is that exactly what teams are looking for, for better or worse?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • James says:

      I think at 1B/LF/DH, you’d always take Trumbo.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • TKDC says:

        I was thinking in comparison to a Michael Bourn type. Bourn has been a really good player and still only got 7 million in his 3rd year in arbitration. I wonder if teams look at this or if the same motives that cause them to pay more in FA for power also cause them to desire power from younger players more (than you would think using WAR as a basis).

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Rudy says:

      Billy Bean certainly looks for the latter of the two.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  6. Eminor3rd says:

    I’d have to think that if he stays healthy for the next 12 months, Sale makes a massive jump on this list. The guy has been the best non-Verlander SP in the AL this year, but the IP increase and weird arm slot are legit concerns so early in his career.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • BK says:

      I think Jered Weaver would disagree.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Cole says:

        Then he’d be wrong. They have the same IP, except Sale beats Weaver in ERA, ERA+, K, BB, HR, rWAR by almost 2.0, etc.

        Sale has probably faced somewhat easier competition, but that doesn’t account for the difference.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  7. keegs says:

    Nats are going to put 5 in the top 30. Stras, Harper, Gio, Zimmerman, Zimmermann. Dynasty.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • 23553 says:

      With the injury issues, and the new contract, I’m not convinced Zimmerman makes it. I think Desmond has more value at this point.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Person says:

      Per Monday’s podcast, Ryan Zimmerman is not on the list. Which I agree with. The other four should make it, I think; but it’s possible that Dave will exclude Jordan Zimmermann.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • TKDC says:

        Possible? Please make the case that Zimmermann is more valuable than Sale?

        The other 3 will make it, though Harper’s spot will probably be a shame based on the author’s extreme bias, not what GM’s would actually do.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Person says:

        Wasn’t implying that. And, it is official per the chat today that Zimmermann isn’t there. Which is fine.

        As for the Trout-Harper ranking, I would put them in that order. I know Dave likes Harper better, but I think he will recognize that at the moment Trout has more value.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • TKDC says:

        I think you are right, but my beef is with Harper in the top-5. I feel like most teams would still rather have a proven guy that is under team control for several years than a guy with half a season of 120ish wRC+ and shaky defense/baserunning (even if he leads the world in hustle and grit) that comes out to about 1.5 WAR. Harper is an amazing player and the sky is the limit, but I don’t think any large or even medium market team would give up more to get him than Evan Longoria (Longoria might not play again this year, but no one is trading the farm for Harper to help in 2012), Andrew McCutchen and at least a few other guys who also have several years of team control at reasonable prices (I’d even throw Strasburg in there). I believe it is also forgotten here that Harper will be a free agent after his age 25 season, and considering his agent is Scott Boras, he’s very unlikely to sign an extension beforehand or give any sort of hometown discount (that’s why guys hire Boras). I think people are forgetting that you are not even getting what are most likely the best years Harper will have in his career (age 26-28).

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        I think of 3 WAR as league average, 5 WAR as an All Star. And there is some margin for error, obviously. So sure, consecutive campaigns of 3.2 and 3.5 fWAR probably make him a somewhat above-average starting pitcher. That by itself would probably put him in Ryan Zimmermann territory (=off the list). But now this year, he’s going nuts, putting together a great campaign. Making him one of the most valuable 30 players in baseball requires you to really buy into that improvement. That’s the point I’ve been making from the beginning.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Person says:

        @Anon:

        Ryan Zimmerman is making 12-14-14-14-14-14-14-18 from 2012-19. Gio Gonzalez is making 3-6-8-11-12 from 2012-16, and if he’s still pitching well, another 12-12 in 17 and 18. If we assume they are equals, Gonzalez has a far better contract.

        Gio was already 35th among all starters in WAR, and now he has a 2.95 xFIP, more SO/9, fewer BB/9. He’s added mph to his fastball. He’s getting ahead in the count more. I suppose you could argue it’s league-related or a fluke, but I think it’s hard to.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Person says:

        @TKDC:

        You make fair points. I’d say that for being 19, the 120 wRC+ is impressive (Trout’s was 90 or so I think); and the defense and base running should improve the next few years. (He’s only been a regular OF for 2 years now.) You’d be paying for good production now that should only get better.

        It’s an interesting take (which I mean positively) that Harper might be too young for max value, because of FA coming as he should hit his prime. Although I’d imagine that his 22-24 seasons shouldn’t look too much different than 25-27. I don’t know much about aging curves but I’d figure improvement is accelerated when learning at MLB instead of AAA or AA.

        Anyway, we’ll see where the list goes from here.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Well-Beered Englishman says:

      From where I sit, they won’t put anybody at all in 26-50 but three guys in the top 25, unless Jordan Zimmermann does make an appearance.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Anon21 says:

      Still skeptical that Gio makes it at all. If he was here, we’d have seen him by now.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Person says:

        He’s 26, coming off consecutive 3-win, 200-inning seasons. And now, he’s better than that even. Then, consider his contract is 5Y-$42M with $12M options in ’17 and ’18, which takes him through his age 32 season. You see what front-line starters make on the open market.

        Plus, he just drew a pretty big trade haul this offseason, and that was before this year’s improvement. I don’t think top 30 is at all too high for him.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul Sporer says:

        League average, right? :)

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        The return on Gonzalez was costly for the Nationals, but unless I’m mistaken, none of Peacock, Cole, Milone, or Norris have ever even ranked in anyone’s Top 100 prospects in baseball. Looks like a quantity over quality package to me.

        And yes, Paul, league average, prior to this season, by fWAR. Obviously, his ERAs have been better than that, so you just have to pick which one you think matters more.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • BX says:

        All but Milone ranked on top 100 lists coming into this season.

        All three were in the top 100 on John Sickels’ preseason list, and Cole and Peacock were in the top 100 (Peacock in the top 50 and Cole barely missing) on BA’s list.

        Sickels gave Cole a B+, Peacock and Norris Bs, and Milone a B- coming into the season,

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul Sporer says:

        From BA – Peacock 36th this year, Norris 38th & 72nd in ’10/’11 and Cole 57th this year, all three were between 60th and 96th on Kevin Goldstein’s list and Cole was 33rd while Norris was 93rd on Keith Law’s list. Serious question: do you read any top 100 prospect lists? Those are three most popular ones and you completely whiffed there.

        It was quite far from “quantity over quality” and I think most analysis after the trade suggested as much quite clearly.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul Sporer says:

        So you think a 30ish ranking in WAR metrics makes league average? You do realize there are 150 SPs in rotations at any given moment, right? I’m sorry, but your league average assessment is way off made worse only by your complete whiffs on the value of the prospects he was traded for.

        I think you’re grasping at straws here. You can dislike the player, that’s fine, but just say it’s an opinion thing that isn’t necessarily backed up by much so we all know where you’re coming from. Some will disagree, some won’t, but at least it’ll be on the table.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        Reply fail… see two threads above.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul Sporer says:

        I think your issue is seeing 3 WAR as league average. Even though you admit it, you seem to discount that he is still above your league average the last two years. A very affordable lefty just coming into his prime with elite strikeout capability showing improvement year over year = not a *league average* arm.

        I think one of the strongest cases for his inclusion on this list where he will be slotted is the price that Washington paid. It was steep, but deservedly so. After all, this is about trade value and his has always been high and we can see that via the several trades he has been a part of in his career. Now that he’s been actualized (whereas he was a prospect in the early trades), we’re seeing *why* it was/is so high.

        Obviously I buy into the improvement, you don’t. I think the league average thing and lack of much support as to why you don’t believe in the improvements has been flimsy, but that’s just my take.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • BX says:

      Dave just said both Zims didn’t make it in his chat.

      I wouldn’t put Gio on the level of a Verlander/Weaver, and he’s due a LOT of money, and he’s a pitcher, so I could see him missing the list as well (although he shouldn’t).

      But Stras and Harper are mortal locks.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        I’d have no problem with Gio in the 40-50 range. 30+ seems like a big overreaction to his first half.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Person says:

        Chat now makes official that Gio is there.

        By the way:

        42/5 or even 66/7 is not a LOT of money in terms of a baseball contract.

        3 wins is somewhat better than league average.

        The improvement in 2012 shows strong signs of being mostly real. Walks are down, strikeouts up.

        BA Top 100 in February had Peacock 36 and Cole 57. Fangraphs in March had Cole 46, Peacock 76, Norris 82.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        I think I was looking at 2011 lists. Anyway, I think Gonzalez is a good pitcher, definitely, I just think he should have been further down the list than he’s going to end up.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul Sporer says:

        The 2011 thing doesn’t help you, still entirely untrue as Norris & Cole popped up on a few of the biggies.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        I’m not saying I did an exhaustive search. I looked at BA (missed Norris somehow), looked at Sickels (and missed Norris again–I think I was assuming he wouldn’t be there if Peacock and Cole weren’t, since they were ranked higher). BP’s lists are subscriber-only, right? What exactly are you trying to prove?

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul Sporer says:

        What exactly are you trying to prove? You’re the one who made a completely incorrect claim, like a million percent incorrect. Don’t get defensive when you’re corrected.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • BX says:

        As well he should make the list.

        I probably worded that comment poorly; there’s a case for him not to, but he really should.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  8. KMiB says:

    Whelp, this pretty much seals that Cueto (again) didn’t make your list.

    That’s crazy.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  9. Guest says:

    So being a rapist doesn’t hurt Sandoval’s trade value?

    -9 Vote -1 Vote +1

  10. Sleight of Hand Pro says:

    33 seems low for ajax, that ranking surprised me. even your blurb suggests a player that should be listed much higher.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  11. Omar says:

    Bullish on all of these guys, seems pretty high for all of them. All players with quite a few questions. Pedoria’s probably the best of the bunch, but I’d rather pay for a sure thing than gamble on guys like these.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  12. Nitram Odarp says:

    My last post on Andrelton Simmons. He has the best defensive scouting reports in the game at SS and his (admittedly SSS) defensive numbers are ridiculous so far. In just 289 innings, he’s amassed the 3rd most DRS and the 2nd most runs saved per UZR. Brendan Ryan, the only guy who ranks ahead of him in both, has played roughly ~385 more innings. He looks like he might have an Andruw Jones in his prime level ability to prevent runs at an even more important position. If he hits at all he’s an incredibly valuable player and all he’s done since turning pro is hit. I’m not saying he should rank this highly, but I’d definitely take him through 2018 over some of the guys in the 50-36 range on their current deals.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • placidity says:

      Last one already?

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • nik says:

      lol. Hey! UZR likes my guy in the 20 games he’s played. Let me shout it out to the world so everyone knows this amazing statistic!

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • byron says:

        That’s not fair: scouts have loved his defense all the way up. Like, saying it was better than anyone’s in the majors while he was still in A-ball.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Nitram Odarp says:

        You do understand the difference don’t you?

        For one, the fact that you can get the counting numbers that high that quickly does say something. It’s not like guys are seeing huge fluctuations where the move up or down a huge amount in a short period of time. Despite the SSS, putting up those numbers in that small of amount of time is still impressive.

        The second thing to note is the scouting reports. Simmons is a guy that has had scouts throw perfect grades on both his arm and his glove. KLaw has already said he’s the best defensive SS in baseball. I’m not saying look how good he is because of his UZR and DRS. I’m saying he’s really good because of his scouting reports and because I’ve watched him play, while noting how amazing his SSS run, in terms of both UZR and DRS, has been.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • byron says:

      As I said yesterday, I think he has a really good argument to be on the back end of this list.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Bookbook says:

      The good news Nitram is that the games matter, lists like these are just for fun. If you turn out to be right that Simmons is the next Ozzie Smith with better offense, he won’t be hurt even a bit by his exclusion here (though it may cost him a few HOF votes at the margins).

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        Quite right. The Braves aren’t trading him anyway.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Nitram Odarp says:

        Oh I know. I just enjoy talking about Andrelton Simmons and sadly, since the injury, there haven’t been a whole lot of opportunities to talk about him. I’ve had my fun now though and I’m not going to keep this up throughout the entire series.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • kid says:

      No offense, but lots of scouts say lots to things. It sounds like we understand what you’re saying, but there’s very limited data on Simmons and people are (rightly) hesitant to go overly bananas on a shortstop who *might* have a better-than-average bat and reportedly has exceptional defense. If he comes back from the DL and goes haywire over the balance of ’12 and into ’13 then you can come back and chide us to your heart’s delight, but to date Simmons’ tale is mostly one of SSS and third-party narrative.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Lars says:

        Your response makes it sound like scouts are mythical creatures, and Andreelton Simmons plays baseball locked away in a box and we’re not allowed to see him.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Anon21 says:

        Seconded, Lars. kid, if you don’t like “third-party narrative,” you’re welcome to go check him out on MLB.com. No point in pretending the glove’s not there.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  13. kid says:

    Are teams still willing to pay a premium for very good/elite defensive skills? Run production is way down, run prevention is doing quite well. I thought we might see more boppers and fewer of the defensive wizards. I mean you can groom a player to improve a fielding but you can’t groom a player to improve his power or contact ability.

    Austin Jackson’s value seems highly inflated by his partial 2012 season. Career wRC+of 108 compared to 153 this season is pretty tough to buy going forward. Even ZiPS only likes him for a .331 wOBA for the balance of ’12.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  14. mcawesome says:

    My Trumbo and Miley for his Weaver. I’d be losing a lot of power, but I’d be vastly improving pitching, obviously.

    Here’s my thing: I’m currently in last place, but the way the schedule runs, I’m playing the 4 teams above me in the standing the next 4 weeks, so it’s not inconceivable that I make a run. My offense is strong (Posey, Trumbo, Phillips, Butler, Holliday, Bourn, Ethier, now Crawford!!!) and my pitching could be a bit better (Sale, Greinke, Miley, Vogelsong, A.Sanchez, Bauer, Griffin, Sheets, Hammel).

    I’m really thinking I’m going to need Trumbombs for power, but I’d love to have Weaver, Sale & Greinke for this stretch run. Any thoughts?

    -5 Vote -1 Vote +1

    • phoenix2042 says:

      I think that this is not rotographs. I also think that Sale’s innings will be limited down the stretch if the White Sox look like they make the posteason so that he can pitch in October. I also think Trumbo is a beast, though.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • mcawesome says:

        Oops, I just got this deal proposed to me and I went to the first page with Trumbo’s name listed on it.

        As for Sale, our playoffs end the first week of Sept, so I might not get hurt by the innings cap. Thanks for your input, though. I need opinions on this, but I’m thinking of staying the course.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  15. Colin P says:

    Still waiting for the first Adrelton Simmons post…

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  16. CLogdorp says:

    Wow….Yuniesky Betancourt has actually upped his value to TOP 30!
    Who’d have thunk it?!

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • TKDC says:

      Still not old, at least not to me. I beg you to make this joke on every post from here on, with the finally of course being one of indignation and slurs about the author’s manhood.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • CLogdorp says:

        Well I won’t have to make it for long, because I think, with that contract, and if the calculations I’ve made through my Rube Goldberg machine are correct, he should be somewhere right around #27-28.
        I’ll doublecheck tonight and bring you the results tomorrow

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  17. d_i says:

    My curiousity for whether or not Josh Willingham makes the list is officially gone with this release. I don’t think there will be a single Twin.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  18. Joncarlos says:

    Man, I think Trumbo is way too low. His power is off the charts. His plate discipline is OK now. Still not Barry Bonds, but good enough. His defense is workable in a corner OF slot and maybe even average at 1B. He isn’t even arb-eligible after this year. He’s only 26. I’ll take 4 cost-controlled years of .280/.350/.550 with upside from there.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  19. Matty Brown says:

    Where’s Gutierrez?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  20. madvillain says:

    Chris Sale at 31 is a joke. Matt Moore has more trade value than the guy currently 2nd in all of baseball in WAR for pitchers?

    What “dramatic loss in velocity” are you talking about? He’s dropped the usual 2-3 mph that everyone who makes the transition to starting does, but he still regularly sits at 94 and hits 97 when he needs to.

    But that’s burying the lede, you can make an argument that his slider is the best in all of MLB.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Rob says:

      Matt Moore is all of 1 spot ahead of Sale and that is in spite of the fact that he comes with 3 additional years of team control. The fact that Sale is ranked right with a guy who was pretty much the unanimous #1 pitching prospect in baseball despite having 3 fewer years of team control is pretty high praise. Not saying it’ll play out the same, but Price wasn’t all that impressive in his first full MLB season either. Doesn’t mean he hasn’t surpassed all the rookie pitchers that looked better in 2009

      Vote -1 Vote +1

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current day month ye@r *