FanGraphs Baseball

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  1. Poor Mike Schmidt.

    Comment by josh worn — February 6, 2013 @ 10:20 am

  2. Prolific power? Check. South Florida? Check. Named in notebooks? Somebody better check.

    Comment by Klements Sausage — February 6, 2013 @ 10:25 am

  3. Stanton may walk 150 times too, that lineup is pathetic.

    Comment by Hurtlockertwo — February 6, 2013 @ 10:25 am

  4. Interesting how often the strike season comes up on that list.

    Comment by Michael Barr — February 6, 2013 @ 10:33 am

  5. Shorter season = likelihood of more anomalous results.

    Of course, most of the data on this leaderboard will be sluggers exceeding their projections for that year; if Stanton does that (and hits 50+) he’ll be challenging the top 5.

    Comment by Aaron (UK) — February 6, 2013 @ 10:49 am

  6. Lame? Check.

    Comment by Ben — February 6, 2013 @ 11:12 am

  7. I am sad for the city of Miami when it comes to baseball. So many broken promises from the team.

    Comment by Mikey — February 6, 2013 @ 11:23 am

  8. I know your context was modern, but it is fun to look at Babe Ruth:

    1921 NY 59/133 44.4%
    1920 NY 54/115 47.0%
    1919 Bos 29/33 87.9%

    Comment by Baseball Bob — February 6, 2013 @ 11:42 am

  9. Babe Ruth in 1920 – 47% and in 1921 – 44%

    Or is there a cutoff year for “historic context”? ;-)

    Comment by JohnnyK — February 6, 2013 @ 11:44 am

  10. Oh shoot, Bob beat me by 2 minutes.

    Comment by JohnnyK — February 6, 2013 @ 11:45 am

  11. Just to nitpick – according to BRef the NYY hit 134 HRs in 1921.

    Comment by JohnnyK — February 6, 2013 @ 11:47 am

  12. Poor Mike Schmidt?
    1974: Phils first decent (almost .500) season since 1967
    1976: Phils first 100 win season… EVER (started playing in 1883)
    1979: Phils miss playoffs after signing Pete Rose. (still over .500)
    1980: Phils world champs
    1981: Phils in goofy playoffs (strike season)

    Those were good Phillies teams. Mike Schmidt was just CRAZY GOOD at baseballing.

    Comment by Dave S — February 6, 2013 @ 11:53 am

  13. Looks like 1981 was the Year of the Lonely Slugger

    Comment by Lg4ny — February 6, 2013 @ 11:58 am

  14. Shows you how much I know about the Philadelphians!

    Comment by josh worn — February 6, 2013 @ 12:11 pm

  15. George Foster only hit 13 homeruns in 1982, not 37.

    Comment by Freddy Threepwood — February 6, 2013 @ 1:17 pm

  16. Yeah. I don’t know what happened with that line of data. Just erased it. Winfield hit 37 that year for NYA, but they hit more than 97 homers as a team.

    Comment by Eno Sarris — February 6, 2013 @ 1:39 pm

  17. Why does Kouzmanoff have the 6th most PA (almost tied for 5th with LoMo) on the team? Way more than Polanco….

    Comment by SB — February 6, 2013 @ 2:44 pm

  18. Even last year Giancarlo Stanton was a lonely slugger on the Marlins. He hit 37 home runs, and in a distant 2nd place was Hanley Ramirez with 14, who was traded by July.

    Comment by Pete — February 6, 2013 @ 2:44 pm

  19. Wally Berger probably had 50% of his team’s HRs in the early 30’s for the Boston Braves over his first 5 or so years in the league. He was Ralph Kiner before there was Ralph Kiner, and without even a plausible #2 slugger for a lousy team.

    Comment by gdc — February 6, 2013 @ 9:22 pm

  20. I have a hard time understanding what the context was, since the article doesn’t say anything about what time period the graph covers, and the beginning of the “modern” period is usually set either at the creation of the AL in 1901 or the end of the dead ball era in 1920. Some notable examples (including only one entry for Wally Berger, who rode being the only good player on some atrocious Braves’ teams to three separate seasons over 50%):

    Gavvy Cravath, 1915 PHN: 24/58 41.4%
    Ralph Kiner, 1949 PIT: 54/126 42.9%
    Rudy York, 1943 DET: 34/77 44.2%
    Wally Berger, 1935 BSN: 34/75 45.3%
    Sam Thompson, 1889 PHN: 20/44 45.5%
    Bill Nicholson, 1944 CHN: 33/71 46.5%
    Buck Freeman, 1899 WAS: 25/47 53.2%
    Bill Nicholson, 1943 CHN: 29/52 55.8%
    Wally Berger, 1930 BSN: 38/66 57.6%
    Harry Stovey, 1883 PHA: 14/20 70%

    And of course the infamous 1884 Chicago White Stockings, who as a team hit 142 of the National League’s 321 home runs (44.2%)… with no other team in the league hitting as many as 40. Benefits of a left field wall 186 feet from home.

    Comment by Jim — February 6, 2013 @ 9:24 pm

  21. It’s tough to compare any eras, but this is the free agency era (since 1974) since I think it’s unfair to compare Stanton to lonely sluggers that were stuck on their teams without any free agents to help.

    Should have put that in. It’s in there now.

    Comment by Eno Sarris — February 6, 2013 @ 9:31 pm

  22. I can’t believe Dave Kingman is on this list multiple times for two different teams…

    Comment by Stevo — February 6, 2013 @ 11:12 pm

  23. He was obviously referring to the fact that Schmidt had to work in the city of Philadelphia all those years.

    Comment by cs3 — February 6, 2013 @ 11:41 pm

  24. I’m ashamed you attached the name of Klement’s Sausages to this garbage.

    Comment by Frank — February 7, 2013 @ 5:25 am

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