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  1. Actually Drew’s split problem is more recent, and not really a “career long issue”. You need to take a closer look

    He was fine against lefties in 2006-2008, but starting in 2009 began a trend of extreme split.

    Drew vs. Lefties:

    2006-2008 376 PA’s .268/.315/.431 .746 OPS
    2009-2010 188 PA’s .195/.251/.320 .571 OPS

    Drew’s career BABIP vs lefties by season

    2006-.591
    2007-.311
    2008-.309
    2009-.217
    2010-.263

    He has a career .296 BABIP vs. Lefties. His career line vs lefties of .244/.294/.395 .688 OPS is about what you would expect.

    Really, the wildly fluctuating BABIP in general is what has always made Drew an enigma. While it’s .307 for his career, (vs. both LHP and RHP) it’s bounced up and down like a yo yo each year. Of course so has his line drive rate. You can see all that in his graphs and split graphs.

    Comment by heyyoo — May 23, 2010 @ 3:26 am

  2. Thanks for the response.

    I was unclear: I did look at that, but as has been emphasized — you need a lot of data to determine splits. He’s probably always had a split, but it’s become more obvious and pronounced the last couple of seasons.

    On platoon skills, see

    http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/index.php/estimating-hitter-platoon-skill/

    Comment by Matt Klaassen — May 23, 2010 @ 4:55 pm

  3. the problem is he wasn’t supposed to be 15th round pick and was paid like a much higher pick. As well as rated that way so you can understand the Dbacks having high expectations.

    Comment by highrent — June 29, 2010 @ 2:18 pm

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