Atlanta Braves: Top 10 Prospects

General Manager: Frank Wren
Farm Director: Kurt Kemp
Scouting Director: Tony DeMacio

FanGraphs’ Top 10 Prospects:
(2009 Draft Picks/International Signees Not Included)

The Braves organization is not churning out the pitching prospects like it once did, but there are some interesting power arms in the system. The club has had some problems with injuries amongst its young pitchers, especially recent draft picks, which is a little worrisome. The two bats at the top of the Top 10 list have a chance to be impact bats – especially Heyward. He could be an absolute monster at the plate. Many of the prospects on the Top 10 list are still a few years away.

1. Jason Heyward, OF, Triple-A
DOB: August 1989 Bats: L Throws: L
Signed: 2007 1st round – Georgia HS
MLB ETA: Early-2010 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3

I loved Heyward on draft day in ’07 and I like him even more now. Despite being drafted out of high school, he’s flown through the system and reached triple-A in ’09 at the age of 20. He began the year in high-A where he hit .296/.369/.519 in 189 at-bats. Heyward then moved up to double-A and produced a line of .352/.446/.611 in 162 at-bats. His season ended with three games in triple-A. The outfielder showed outstanding power with an ISO rate of .222 in high-A and .259 in double-A. He also displayed the potential to provide five to 10 steals and Heyward had a double-digit walk rate, which topped out at 14.7% in double-A. His BB/K rate of 1.47 at that same level was outstanding. There are few holes in his game. Heyward’s durability is currently surrounded by question marks after be was dogged by minor injuries during the season and in the Arizona Fall League.

2. Freddie Freeman, 1B, Double-A
DOB: September 1989 Bats: L Throws: R
Signed: 2007 2nd round – California HS
MLB ETA: Late-2010 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3

Freeman’s season began very well in high-A when he .302/.394/.447 in 255 at-bats. The first baseman found the going much tougher in double-A and he hit just .248/.308/.342 in 149 at-bats. His power also dropped with his ISO rate going from .145 to .094. Even at its peak last season, Freeman’s power output was below-average for an impact first baseman, but he projects as a 20-homer guy — not a true slugger. One reason for his poor numbers in double-A was the drop in BABIP, from .341 to .273; he was also playing with a hand injury. On the positive side, his strikeout rate actually dropped from 16.1 to 12.8%, so he wasn’t completely over-matched. He’ll head back to double-A in 2010.

3. Julio Teheran, RHP, Low-A
DOB: January 1991 Bats: R Throws: R
Signed: 2007 non-drafted international free agent (Colombia)
MLB ETA: Early-2013 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3
Repertoire: 89-94 mph fastball, curveball, change-up

There is no question that Teheran has the stuff to be a dominating starter in the Majors, but his durability is in question, as he’s been slowed by shoulder soreness. He made just 14 starts in ’09 and he split the year between rookie ball and low-A ball. At the senior level, Teheran posted a 3.68 FIP and allowed 42 hits in 37.2 innings. He showed good control with a walk rate of 2.63 BB/9 but his strikeout rate was just 6.69 K/9. The right-hander has a good change-up but his breaking ball still needs work, which is one of the reasons for the low strikeout rate. Teheran is loaded with potential but he’s just 18 years old and will likely develop slowly, especially with the organization being cautious with his health.

4. Arodys Vizcaino, RHP, Short-Season
DOB: November 1990 Bats: R Throws: R
Signed: 2007 non-drafted international free agent (Dominican Republic)
MLB ETA: Mid-2013 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3
Repertoire: 89-95 mph, plus curveball, change-up

Vizcaino had a very impressive season as a teenager in short-season ball. He missed a lot of bats with a strikeout rate of 11.06 K/9 and he kept the walks in check at 3.19 BB/9. In 42.1 innings, Vizcaino allowed just 34 hits and two homers (0.43 HR/9). His ground-ball rate improved 10% over his debut season in ’08 to 48%, which is a positive trend that will hopefully continue in 2010. If he reaches his potential, Vizcaino has the stuff to be a front-line starter… but he’s also a ways away from the Majors. He was the key player acquired recently in the Javier Vazquez deal with the Yankees.

5. Craig Kimbrel, RHP, Triple-A
DOB: May 1988 Bats: R Throws: R
Signed: 2008 3rd round – Wallace State CC
MLB ETA: Mid-2010 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3
Repertoire: 91-95 mph fastball, slider, change-up

Kimbrel has flown through the system since signing in ’08. The right-handed reliever has posted outstanding strikeout rates throughout the minors, including 17.10 K/9 in 20.0 low-A innings and 15.38 K/9 in 26.1 high-A innings, both in 2009. His control, though, has been more spotty. Kimbrel posted a walk rate of 2.70 BB/9 in low-A but it rose to 9.57 BB/9 in high-A. He also pitched 11.2 innings in double-A and walked seven batters with 17 Ks. Overall on the year, he allowed 30 hits, 45 walks and struck out 103 batters in 60.0 innings. Kimbrel needs to sharpen his control before reaching the Majors, but he has closer potential with a blazing fastball and good slider.

6. Randall Delgado, RHP, Low-A
DOB: February 1990 Bats: R Throws: R
Signed: 2006 non-drafted international free agent (Panama)
MLB ETA: Late-2012 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3
Repertoire: 91-95 mph fastball, plus curveball, change-up

Another good arm, Delgado proved his durability in ’09 by making 25 starts in low-A ball. He allowed 123 hits in 124.0 innings and posted a FIP of 3.20. He also showed a consistent ability to miss bats with his good fastball and he posted a strikeout rate of 10.23 K/9. His control was OK, especially given his experience level, and he had a walk rate of 3.56 BB/9. Delgado also did a nice job of keeping the ball in the park (0.65 HR/9). He was particularly effective against left-handed hitters, who managed to produce an average of just .225 against him. He also posted a strikeout rate of 10.92 K/9 against them, compared to 8.87 K/9 against right-handed batters.

7. Ezekiel Spruill, RHP, Low-A
DOB: September 1989 Bats: B Throws: R
Signed: 2008 2nd round – Georgia HS
MLB ETA: Late-2012 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3
Repertoire: 88-93 mph fastball, slider, change-up

Spruill had a nice first season out of rookie ball with a 3.37 FIP in low-A. He was a little too hittable, though, and he allowed 120 hits in 116.0 innings. Spruill is always around the strike zone, though, and the hitters in the low minors tend to be free swingers. He showed outstanding control with a walk rate of 1.86 BB/9. The right-hander backed that up with a strikeout rate of 7.37 K/9. He also posted an outstanding ground-ball rate just shy of 57% on the year. Spruill’s stuff is more solid than electric and he projects to be a No. 3 starter in the Majors.

8. Christian Bethancourt, C, Rookie
DOB: September 1991 Bats: R Throws: R
Signed: 2008 non-drafted international free agent (Panama)
MLB ETA: Mid-2013 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3

Bethancourt had a solid debut season in the low minors. In rookie ball, he hit .275/.340/.443 in 166 at-bats. The right-handed hitter did struggle against left-handed pitchers and he posted an OPS of just .577. For a teenager, Bethancourt showed a good eye at the plate and intriguing raw power. He’s known as a good leader behind the plate and he also has promising arm strength, as he threw out 30% of base stealers in ’09. He’ll likely move up to low-A in 2010, where he’ll be one of the youngest players in the league.

9. Cody Johnson, OF, High-A
DOB: August 1988 Bats: L Throws: R
Signed: 2006 1st round – Florida HS
MLB ETA: Mid-2012 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3

People seem to either love or hate Johnson as a prospect. Just 21, he slugged 32 homers last year, and has gone deep 58 times over the last two seasons. However, his strikeout rate actually rose from his 37.8% mark in ’08 to 40.6% in ’09 as he moved up from low-A to high-A. On the plus side, his walk rate also rose, from 7.9% to 13.2%. Johnson will need to tone down his swing if he’s going to succeed even in double-A, but he’d still have above-average power if he swung with one hand tied behind his back. With a .242 batting average in high-A, he’ll likely struggle to hit even .220 in 2010 if he doesn’t make some adjustments. At this point, he’s a long shot to be an impact player in the Majors but he’s fun to follow.

10. Adam Milligan, OF, High-A
DOB: March 1988 Bats: L Throws: R
Signed: 2008 6th round – Walters State CC
MLB ETA: Late-2011 40-Man Roster: No Options: 3

Milligan did not get into game action after signing in ’08 so ’09 represented his debut season. The outfielder had an outstanding season while spending the majority of the season in low-A where he hit .345/.393/.589 in 197 at-bats. He also posted an ISO of .244 but he was raw on the base paths and got caught five times in nine attempts. The left-handed hitter did OK against southpaws, but he still posted much better numbers against right-handers (.870 vs 1.013 OPS on the year). His walk rate was low at 5.7% but his strikeout rate was OK at 21.8% given his power output. Milligan received a taste of High-A ball and he should return there in 2010. With just 256 pro at-bats, we still don’t no exactly what this intriguing prospect has to offer.

Up Next: Tampa Bay Rays




Print This Post



Marc Hulet has been writing at FanGraphs since 2008. His work focuses on prospect analysis. Follow him on Twitter @marchulet.


35 Responses to “Atlanta Braves: Top 10 Prospects”

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
  1. Kevin S. says:

    Roy Clark is no longer the SD in Atlanta.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  2. PWH says:

    Thank you for not ranking Mike Minor in the top-10. I’m really tired of reading articles that rank Minor as the system’s 4th best.

    I still don’t think Cody Johnson belongs in the top-10. Excellent call on Milligan, though.

    I did my list two months ago and (plugging Vizcaino in) I only have one in my top-10 that you don’t, J J Hoover. My top-10:

    1. Heyward
    2. Teheran
    3. Freeman
    4. Vizcaino
    5. Betancourt
    6. Kimbrel
    7. R. Delgado
    8. Spruill
    9. Hoover
    10. Milligan

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Zach says:

      I’m interested as to why you think he doesn’t deserve to be in the top 10? I think he’s a no-brainer because if you compare him to Spruill, he has similar upside with much less risk. In just a few starts, he dominated the same league that Spruill played at this year. Obviously Spruill is younger with more projection but they both project as middle of the rotation starters. I think most of the criticism of Minor has to do with him being picked 7th ahead of more talented players. It’s a valid point but draft value shouldn’t be reflected in a top 10 list.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • PWH says:

        I don’t think you can say Minor and Spruill have similar upside. Spruill has top of the rotation (not ace, but number-2-esque) potential. Minor’s potential is more like that of a mid-rotation starter.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Zach says:

        Even if I accept your analysis of their upside, which is questionable, I’m pretty sure you just made a case for similar potential. Spruill at #2 and Minor at #3 is about as similar as it gets without being the same. However, I think Marc’s analysis of Spruill as a #3 starter is more accurate which would make their upsides even that more similar. Not that it really matters anymore because Minor’s exclusion was procedural. I assure you he will continue to be listed in the top half of the Braves’ top 10 prospect lists.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • nmh says:

      Mike Minor would be on this list had he not been drafted in 2009. None of the 2009 draftees are on the teams Top-10 list.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Alex says:

      Seriously man, you really don’t think Minor should even crack the top 10? Let’s just take Hoover as an example here. Minor is younger, more projectable (same height but much skinnier), more polished, lefthanded, has far more advanced secondary stuff, has better control, etc. The only thing Hoover has on Minor is a couple extra ticks on his fastball, and even that’s been overblown as Minor has consistently sat in the 89 to 90 MPH range.

      Maybe the kid doesn’t have the same sort of upside as some of the other arms in the system, but something has to be said for floor and Minor’s seems extremely high, especially when compared to guys like Teheran, Vizcaino, Kimbrel, Delgado, Spruill, and Hoover. This just seems like frustration with the draft pick as opposed to a reasonable look at the relative values of Minor and the Braves other prospects.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  3. Bronnt says:

    Huge missed opportunity to drop a “Three True Outcomes” reference when talking about Cody Johnson.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  4. Marc Hulet says:

    Isn’t that the cliched statement with Johnson, though? And with this crowd, it’s fairly evident…

    Hoover probably ranks as No. 11 on my list, for what it’s worth.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  5. Trevor says:

    I like this list, although I’m not a huge Milligan fan due to his low BB rate. I would put Delgado above Kimbrel, but that’s just a minor change.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  6. MetsKnicksRutgers says:

    I have known about Heyward since the beginning of 08, and I have always heard how good he was going to be. I had held out some hope that he’d bust, but after seeing those slash lines it seems like there is no way this kid is anything but a monster. Freaking 260 ISO in AA at 19? <1050 OPS? Good god.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Bronnt says:

      He’s basically the left-handed version of Justin Upton. Just add some more plate discipline and a couple of minor health issues.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  7. 198d says:

    what ever happened to cole rohrbough? didn’t he used to project ahead of teheran, delgado et al? did he fall off a cliff last season?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Trevor says:

      Apparently he had some personal issues, and when he started struggling even contemplated quitting baseball. At least that’s what I read on another site. That combined with some bad luck led to a disappointing season. There were some positives though. His K rate remained fairly good. I think he’ll probably rebound a bit in ’10.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  8. Brandon says:

    The Braves do not have a low A team. Rome is A, Myrtle Beach is A+, Mississippi is AA, and Gwinnet is AAA.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Alex says:

      Rome is Low-A. You are confused; I assume you mean “short-season A” ball, or A-, a level at which the Braves do not have a team. The levels go:

      Complex Leagues (GCL or AZL)
      High Rookie (Appy or Pioneer)
      Short-Season, A- (NWL or NYPL)
      Low A (SAL or MWL)
      High A (CAR, FSL, or CAL)
      AA (Southern, Texas, or Eastern)
      AAA (PCL or International)

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  9. I suppose that Medlen no long qualifies for this list, but the braves need to start using him

    http://gameofinches.blogspot.com/2010/01/free-kris-medlen.html

    Last year, the Braves seemed content with a rotation consisting of Javier Vasquez (2.82 xFIP), Derek Lowe (4.19 xFIP), Tommy Hanson (4.15 xFIP), Jair Jurrjens (4.34 xFIP), and Kenshin Kawakami (4.61 xFIP).

    With the trade of vasquez and extention of hudson, this sets the 2010 Braves rotation with Hudson-Hanson-Lowe-Jurrjens-Kawakami. Not bad, but it could be better. Why? Lost in this mix is a hidden gem: Kris Medlen.

    Kris Medlen, who dominated the minors in 2009 (1.66 FIP, 10.51 K/9, 2.39 BB/9 in AAA last season), was called up a few weeks prior to super prospect Tommy Hanson. In 4 MLB starts, Medlen posted an ugly 6.38 ERA, but the underlying numbers show something better. Despite his struggles with command when promoted (5.40 BB/9 in his 4 starts), Medlen still managed to fool his share of hitters (9.33 K/9, 77.8% contact rate (80.5% MLB average)) and keep the ball in the yard at a respectable rate (0.98 HR/9, 1.05 MLB average). Beneath the ugly ERA was a much less ugly 4.57 FIP/xFIP. After being moved to the bullpen, Medlen’s contact rate fell to 75.3%, his strikeout rate rose to 9.67 per nine and the walk rate, which only once (AA, 2007) eclipsed 2.63 per nine in the minors, fell to an MLB-average 3.47 per nine.

    The result? A stellar 2.89 FIP/3.38 xFIP in 49.1 IP from the pen. Medlen posted the 19th best FIP and 25th best xFIP of all MLB relievers who tossed 40+ innings last season (out of 176 RPs). By comparison, super closer Joe Nathan posted a 2.88 FIP last season. Yeah, Medlen is just that good. As the season progressed, Medlen just got better.

    Medlen sports three pitches: a devastating change up, a quality fastball and a league-average curveball. His arsenal is so effective not just because of the quality of his stuff, but also the effectively deceptive nature of his release point (check his pitch FX data clustering)

    The moral of the story here? Kris Medlen is very good. He is much better than Jair Jurrjens and Kenshin Kawakami and probably even Derek Lowe and Tim Hudson, despite the ERA disparities. The Braves are wasting a golden arm.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • TCQ says:

      You’re seriously gonna say he’s better than Jurrjens?

      I mean, I’m a Medlin fan, but Jurrjens has already logged two very productive MLB seasons. Medlin isn’t *nearly* that projectable. This whole post needs a huge reality check.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • TCQ says:

      Two years of just shy of 4 WAR most certainly does not pale in comparison to Medlin’s mostly non-existent MLB numbers. That’s simply absurd.

      Both of his seasons have been better than anything you should expect from Medlin…even with the decline in FIP and xFIP from 2008, tRA liked him much more, so I’m not really sure what to think other than that his seasons were pretty close to equal…and both really quite good.

      The Fans have him projected for 4.1 wins in 2010 too, for what that’s worth.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Bronnt says:

      I do agree that there’s a gem in the rough in Medlen, but you can’t really say he’s better than Jurrjenns based on 70 innings of xFIP. Jurrjenns has posted two straight season with FIP’s right around 3.6, making him basically a 4 WAR pitcher.

      Most of Medlen’s good innings came in low-leverage bullpen situations, which is a different standard than starting (hence the run difference used to define replacement level between starters and relievers).

      Medlen would/will fill in very well in the event of an injury, and there’s a sound argument to have him starting over Kawakami, but there’s also a clear reason he’s been cast into the bullpen.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • look at not just the numbers in the majors, but also the minors, where Medlen was also superior. I will put plenty of $$ down on Medlen having a better season by age than Jurjjens.

        Please explain the “clear reason” he was banished to the bullpen because I do not see it as clear. Medlen was barely given a chance to start and he was not that bad when he did. He was just unlucky. a 4 game sample is ridiculously useless.

        Additionally, I put ZERO credence into Fan projections. None whatsoever. Steve Phillips loves to predict baseball with his heart and eyes. As someone with respect for the game, I like to be more scientific, even if my science is not the most exact. I highly doubt most “Fan projections” were based on any scientific model. CHONE and Bill James, whose forecasts I will take infinitely before “Fans”, places Medlen as the better pitcher ERA, K, BB, and WHIP-wise.

        I do not have a forecast model that I do on my own in place for Pitchers (only hitters), but there is no indication whatsoever that Jurjjens will have a better season next year based on his peripherals. tRA’s favoritism of Jurrjens is based on his lower LD% and until MLB has a uniform and non-arbitrary way of classifying LD%, I won’t put too much credence in tRA.

        ___

        Last year, the Braves seemed content with a rotation consisting of Javier Vasquez (2.82 xFIP), Derek Lowe (4.19 xFIP), Tommy Hanson (4.15 xFIP), Jair Jurrjens (4.34 xFIP), and Kenshin Kawakami (4.61 xFIP). With the return of Tim Hudson (and his subsequent 3-year extension), one of those five became expendible. Despite Atlanta’s best efforts to move Lowe this offseason, the odd man out was Javier Vasquez. Though Vasquez was moved for money (which was partially used to sign Troy Glaus), they also managed to receive a high quality pitching prospect (Aroyds Vizcaino) in return.

        This sets up the 2010 Braves rotation as Hudson-Hanson-Lowe-Jurrjens-Kawakami. Not bad, but it could be better. Why? Lost in this mix is a hidden gem: Kris Medlen.

        Kris Medlen, who dominated the minors in 2009 (1.66 FIP, 10.51 K/9, 2.39 BB/9 in AAA last season), was called up a few weeks prior to super prospect Tommy Hanson. In 4 MLB starts, Medlen posted an ugly 6.38 ERA, but the underlying numbers show something better. Despite his struggles with command when promoted (5.40 BB/9 in his 4 starts), Medlen still managed to fool his share of hitters (9.33 K/9, 77.8% contact rate (80.5% MLB average)) and keep the ball in the yard at a respectable rate (0.98 HR/9, 1.05 MLB average). Beneath the ugly ERA was a much less ugly 4.57 FIP/xFIP. After being moved to the bullpen, Medlen’s contact rate fell to 75.3%, his strikeout rate rose to 9.67 per nine and the walk rate, which only once (AA, 2007) eclipsed 2.63 per nine in the minors, fell to an MLB-average 3.47 per nine.

        The result? A stellar 2.89 FIP/3.38 xFIP in 49.1 IP from the pen. Medlen posted the 19th best FIP and 25th best xFIP of all MLB relievers who tossed 40+ innings last season (out of 176 RPs). By comparison, super closer Joe Nathan posted a 2.88 FIP last season. Yeah, Medlen is just that good. As the season progressed, Medlen just got better.

        Though Medlen showed signs of fatigue as the season wound down, there is a clear trend of improvement in his numbers from May to mid-September. Despite these clear signs of improvement, the Braves kept Medlen banished to the bullpen (where he was effective, but underutilized). Since being promoted to a starter’s gig in 2008, Medlen has posted a 2.87 FIP in AA and a 1.66 FIP in AAA, while sporting a K/BB of 4.44 and 4.40 at each respective level. Using his minor league numbers, Medlen’s major league equivalent FIP as a starter in 2008, per Minor League Splits, was a solid 3.82. MLE data for 2009 is not available for Kris Medlen, but his luck/park neutralized FIP in AAA last year was 2.42.

        Medlen sports three pitches: a devastating change up, a quality fastball and a league-average curveball. His arsenal is so effective not just because of the quality of his stuff, but also the effectively deceptive nature of his release point. Medlen tosses his three pitch mix from an almost identical release point, each having its own distinct velocity and movement. Such is how Medlen is able to so effectively fool hitters.

        The moral of the story here? Kris Medlen is very good. He is much better than Jair Jurrjens and Kenshin Kawakami and probably even Derek Lowe and Tim Hudson, despite the ERA disparity. The Braves are wasting a golden arm. If given another chance to start, Medlen could be one of the best fantasy sleepers for 2010.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Oops sorry about reposting the article clip at the bottom of this last response. My computer is glitching with copy/paste stuff.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • TCQ says:

        “I will put plenty of $$ down on Medlen having a better season by age than Jurjjens.”

        Jurrjens is younger…something does not compute here.

        You also just seem to be dismissing anything that doesn’t agree with you…Fan Projections are iffy, of course, because they haven’t been tested out, but they’re basically just a sample of what this(very intelligent) community thinks about whatever player they’re projecting…but even worse is dismissing tRA, which is a good stat just because it “favors Jurrjens due to his lower LD%”…last time I checked, giving up fewer line drives was a good thing(although the sustainability is obviously questionable, you’re right).

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • I agree that low LD% is good. It’s just that LD% is semi-trivial that I prefer xFIP — which still isn’t perfect, as HR/FB rate should be changed to HR/Non-GB rate

        http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/index.php/what-i-hate-about-line-drives/

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Adam says:

        David MVP Eckstein, you are missing a very important point when trying to compare Medlen’s numbers to Jurrjens’s numbers. Medlen primarily pitched in relief for short stints, allowing him to have more velocity and otherwise better numbers. No, Medlen did not get enough starts to make his starting numbers meaningful, but that doesn’t mean that his relief numbers are valid to compare to Jurrjens’s numbers as a starter.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • I would also, however, point to minor league numbers then, where Medlen also trumps jurrjens.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Alex says:

        Medlen was primarily used as a reliever in the minors (over 75% of his appearances) and was far older than Jurrjens at each stop (Jurrjens made his MLB debut at the same age that Medlen made his full season debut). Jurrjens has also already shown the ability to throw 200+ innings in a season, while Medlen has never topped 121. Also, did anyone bother pointing out to you yet that Jurrjens actually had a lower tERA than Medlen last year?

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  10. CircleChange11 says:

    I’m looking forward to seeing Heyward play in ’10. I’m not looking forward to the comparison to “insert name of Hall of Famer” when he has a big 2 weeks. That gets old (see Jay Bruce’s call up a coupla years ago for a recent example).

    I’ve never seen him play live, but when I see his image, I think “Ray Lankford” … and I mean that in a good way.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  11. DropDeadFred says:

    How does the recent injury news of Jurrjens impact Medlen?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Alex says:

      You mean the news that Jurrjens MRI was clean? I don’t think that will affect Medlen all that much. If someone does eventually go down after the 1st month (when a 5th starter isn’t needed because of off days) then I imagine Medlen would be the first or second option to fill that void (dependent on whether or not Jojo Reyes shows anything up to that point).

      Vote -1 Vote +1

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>