Carlos Beltran’s Trade Value

The vastly under-appreciated Carlos Beltran hit three home runs last night, boosting his line for the season to .296/.387/.590 (.417 wOBA). Although the Mets are, as expected, not in contention this season, Beltran’s return to his pre-2010 offensive form so far has been a welcome development. Given Beltran’s age and recent injury issues, it wasn’t out of the realm of possibility that he’d simply not be able to contribute much this season. Despite the hot start, he’s in the last year of a big contract and probably not part of the Mets future. Beltran is probably a trade candidate. What sort of value does he have on the trade market?

While Beltran is most probably hitting above his talent so far this year, it shouldn’t come as a complete shock. He had a .398 wOBA over 357 plate appearances in 2009 before he went out with injury, and it is at least partly understandable that he would have some rust to shake off in his disappointing return in 2010. Beltran’s .295 ISO in 2011 is probably the biggest thing that stands out as likely to regress, but it isn’t as if he was a pea-shooter before. His walks, strikeouts, and BABIP are all in line with previous performances. ZiPS projects a .275/.363/.470 (.366 wOBA) line for the rest of Beltran’s 2011, which is very good in this run environment — about 28 runs above average over 700 plate appearances.

An important question with regard to Beltran is whether he can still play center field or not. While he did play there upon his return last season, he has spent his time in right field in 2011. That’s to be expected, I suppose, given the effect of his injuries. Assuming that he’s merely an average-ish defensive corner outfielder so far, combined with the ZiPS projection for his offense above, over 150 games he’d be at least a 3.5 win player (+28 offense – 7.5 positional adjustment + 20 NL replacement level all prorated for 150 games) — very valuable in itself.

If we assume that a marginal win is being valued at $5 million this season, his $18.5 salary for 2011 is right in line with his estimated value (since value and salary are roughly equal here, there’s no need for prorating his surplus value for a partial season). That isn’t bad at all considering the unfairly bad press Beltran’s contract sometimes gets. From the perspective of trying to trade Beltran, however, it is problematic, since that also means there isn’t any surplus value in a straight-up trade. I’m not sure if Beltran would qualify as a Type A or B free agent at this point, but even in the unlikely event that free-agent compensation remains the same in the new collective bargaining agreement, Beltran’s contract contains a clause that prevents him from being arbitration-eligible after the 2011 season (according to Cot’s), so there isn’t any potential additional value there, either.

Of course, the Mets and their likely trade partners realize this, so a trade of Beltran would need to involve cash being sent along by New York. Victor Wang’s important research (helpfully summarized here) from a few years ago gives an idea of the average surplus dollar value of prospects and draft picks. Keep in mind, however, that this research was done a few years ago, so the value of the “baseball dollar” has inflated. Moreover, teams generally seem to have been valuing their prospects more highly in recent years.

This isn’t to put down Beltran or the contract the oft-maligned Omar Minaya gave him. While injuries have limited him recently, Beltran put up legitimate superstar-level performances for the Mets from 2006 through the first half of 2009, and has had an overall career that compares well with some Hall of Famers. As his performance so far this season indicates, he still has plenty left in the tank. A team that is in contention and needs a corner outfielder should be willing to give up something for Beltran — in the right situation giving up a minor part of a team’s future for a better chance at the playoffs makes sense. Beltran does have value to a possible trade partner above simply his WAR-per-dollar value. However, most of the return on a Beltran trade will likely depends on how much cash the Mets are willing and able to send along. Given Beltran’s abilities, salary, the time remaining on the season, and the increasingly high value teams place on their prospects, it is hard to imagine the Mets getting more than a couple of C prospects in return for Beltran if they send a few million dollars along. That isn’t praise or criticism — just a description. C prospects have value. Hopefully for the Mets, they can get a piece or two that help them down the road. Hopefully for Beltran, the Mets can find a trade partner that he can help get to the playoffs.




Print This Post



Matt Klaassen reads and writes obituaries in the Greater Toronto Area. If you can't get enough of him, follow him on Twitter.


92 Responses to “Carlos Beltran’s Trade Value”

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
  1. Jross says:

    Could this be the year the Rays make a big move at the deadline? And can Beltran play First base?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • j6takish says:

      If he can play centerfield, I’m sure he can play 1b.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Mowses says:

      He could play RF with Zobrist moving to first base. Dude can play anywhere!!!

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • CircleChange11 says:

        But Zobrist at 1B significantly hurts his overall value.

        He’s plus value elsewhere, average or below at 1B.

        1B is where you put the guys that can hit, but not field (generally speaking).

        A lot of Z’s value is in defense.

        Anyone can play 1B defensively. It’s the easiest position. It’s a question of whether one can hit enough to play 1B.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Sean says:

        Isn’t it all relative? If Beltran’s a below-average defender at first and in right and Zobrist is above average at both positions, then you’d want to arrange them in whatever alignment accumulates the most positive (or least negative) defensive value. No?

        Either of those guys would definitely be an upgrade over Dan Johnson’s sub-.400 OPS (not a typo).

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • DD says:

        Johnny Damon tried 1B this year in the spring. Put Beltran in left, where you maximize his defensive value. Unless the Mets pay most of his remaining salary (I mean all but about a million) no way Tampa tries it tho.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Ryan says:

        CircleChange, you’re kidding right? Anyone can play 1b defensively? In what, kickball? Beltran has never played the infield, never. Having hard grounders hit at you when you’ve never fielded grounders before is extremely hard. The footwork at firstbase is also very important, you just dont pick that up over night and some never do. Hardest positions on the diamond, catcher, 2b, then 1b. Its amazing how unknowing some of you people are when it comes to the game in reality. I’ve been coaching for over 30 years and in no way is firstbase the easiest position.

        -5 Vote -1 Vote +1

      • My echo and bunnymen says:

        1b is harder than shortstop, center field, and pitching? Hell let’s change the WAR components, right now.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Andy says:

      I just mentioned this to a friend at work today. The Rays could be good trade partners with the Mets for Beltran or Reyes. Although the Rays wouldn’t likely trade the top quality prospects Reyes would require.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • AA says:

      Why would you put him at 1B? The guy was one of the best defensive CF before his knee injury. There is no reason to think he can’t be a plus corner OF going forward, especially because his arm has always been extremely good.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  2. guest says:

    Beltran wouldn’t have great value offensively at first base, by the way.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Andy says:

      To the Rays he would.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Big Jgke says:

        But by that logic, virtually any player would. Its a valueless statement.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Mike H says:

        No it’s not. Positional value modifiers only make sense in a vaccuum. The bottom line is this: If the Rays have X amount of offense, no matter how it’s distributed. If you take replace any piece, at any position, with a player that adds more offensive value, then the team’s offensive output has improved.

        Beltran has no offensive value as a 1b to most teams, because most teams have a 1b that is a better hitter. But if you have a garbage 1b, than Beltran has offensive value as a 1b.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  3. j6takish says:

    I hope Detroit takes a look at him. We are getting dick from our corner outfield spots right now, and we have the financial resources to be able to take on his whole contract in exchange for lower quality prospects. However, this would be a smart decision, and I think Dombrowski used all his smarts on the Cabrera trade

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  4. Rick says:

    He sure would look nice in LF in Cincinnati — and the Reds definitely have the prospects to get it done.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Sean O'Neill says:

      Todd Frazier or Yonder Alonso would look just as good…and cheaper.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • chuckb says:

        Cheaper financially, but not in terms of the prospects the Rays would have to give up. Someone like Alonso would cost a lot more in terms of talent.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Rick says:

        Cheaper? Definitely. Just as good, hardly. Neither are bets to hit as well as Beltran and there’s no way they match his defense.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Ethan says:

      Now you’re talking. He would also help to balance the Righty heavy lineup out with a Switch Hitter.

      Stubbs R
      Phillips R
      Votto L
      Beltran S
      Bruce L
      Rolen R
      Hanigan/Hernandez R
      Janish R
      P

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  5. James says:

    Beltran and Davis for Francouer and Hosmer… can something be so totally absurd yet semi-plausible at the same time?

    -12 Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Andy says:

      Why would the Royals want a half year rental on Beltran, unless you think they will still be in the race this year?

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • chuckb says:

        Better yet, why would the Mets want Francoeur back?

        +12 Vote -1 Vote +1

      • James says:

        The point of the comment was that it is a ridiculous thought and I don’t think either team would do it, but the more I thought about it, it started seeming less and less ridiculous (although unlikely in that deals of this type never happen).

        I think most people would agree that Beltran is likely to outperform Francouer the rest of the year, and the Mets would likely eat a decent portion of Beltran’s contract. The Mets obviously would not be interested in Francouer, but they presumably would be very interested in Hosmer and need to save money. Francouer’s inclusion is purely for comedic purposes.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Big Jgke says:

      should have finished that sentence at ‘absurd’

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Ian says:

      James, don’t drink before posting here. Ridiculous.

      +7 Vote -1 Vote +1

    • MNTwinsGuy says:

      Wow, thats all I have to say about that trade proposal.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  6. theperfectgame says:

    I’m a Mets fan, so I’m inherently biased here, but if Beltran is healthy, playing almost every day, and producing, I’ll take the over on “a few C prospects”, even as a pure rental with no compensatory picks coming back. We’ll see, though.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • vivalajeter says:

      I agree with you. The way he’s looked this year, he can be a big difference-maker in a tight division. If it would only take a few C prospects, I’d think there’d be plenty of teams willing to make the trade – and in that case, the return would need to be higher.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • JR says:

      There are a lot of places that could potentially use Carlos Beltran, which could also serve to drive his price up a bit.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  7. CircleChange11 says:

    The problem with CB has never been performance. It’s health.

    So that he’s off to a great start is no different than any other year, basically.

    2005 has been the only full season where he hasn’t put up 5+ WAR.

    People have commented that he looks great and he looks healthy …. well, yeah, he does … when he’s healthy. The problem is that next week, he might not. An outfielder with knee injuries. It’s like a power hitter with back problems.

    But, if healthy he could definitely swing a division race to one direction. The question is whether the Mets want major prospects back in trade or if they just want freed of the risk/contract.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Nick says:

      How about a trade to Oakland? Then Oakland could field an Outfield with five oft-injured guys who constantly need time off to rest. Could work perfectly, as each guy plays at max 5 days a week.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  8. TheKayell says:

    So the Mets are a team with a corner outfielder who they like but could be trying to shop. What’s the main semi-competitive or better team in the NL right now with no good corner outfielders? The Phillies.

    Not gonna happen, but it’d make for a wild trade.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  9. vivalajeter says:

    I’m not sure what kind of young talent they’ll get, but I can’t imagine they’d be more exciting without Beltran and, especially, Reyes.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  10. Greg says:

    I’m pretty sure that if a guy is a type A free agent and isn’t offered arbitration (Beltran can’t be offered arb), the team that let him go would still get type B compensation.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  11. Sean says:

    New Yankee DH. Noesi and a low level guy to the Mets.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  12. jfcincotta says:

    This reasoning is problematic. Even is Beltran were overpaid, in season, he has excess value to bubble teams.

    The value of a marginal win to a projected 88-win team is significantly higher at the trade deadline than it is on the open market over the summer. As such, Beltran may have a good deal of surplus value at the deadline.

    The other factor is, if a team has a 1.5 win player that they’re trotting out everyday, there aren’t 3.5 win players freely available to that team in order to improve. As such, the team can’t go out and add two wins at the $10MM market rate. Trading is the only option. Because above-average players like Beltran are scarce, he has market value.

    This passes the smell test too. Imagine that the Red Sox and Tampa are tied for second place in the division on July 30th. The upgrade for either team playing Beltran in the OF provides surplus value on top of the ~$6MM they’d have to pay him. Making the playoffs would be worth tens of millions of dollars. Presumably, beating the other for Beltran and keeping him off the other’s team would create immense value, and would justify giving up much better than a C-level prospect.

    +8 Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Jonathan says:

      This is absolutely correct. The whole reason the trade deadline attracts heightened interest is because the market heats up when teams in contention vie for the scarce available talent. The value calculation at the deadline has many factors beyond WAR and contract dollars. You have to take into account how many other players of similar talent are available (i.e. being shopped for a trade) at the position, how many teams are in contention that could use an upgrade at that position, and how big the upgrade would be. The commenters on this board have already suggested a number of teams who could use an upgrade in the OF. And, as Jason points out, for many of these teams, an additional 1.5 wins over the remaining season would be disproportionately valuable. If those wins get you into the playoffs, they are worth far more than the average $$/WAR in the league.

      When you combine the disproportionate value of the wins for the “buying” team, and the scarcity of 3.5 WAR OF available at the deadline, it seems unlikely a C-level prospect or two will get it done. The Mets will definitely shop Beltran if he stays healthy, and they should get one top prospect back in return even if they do have to ship some cash.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • MC says:

        Yes, I agree – there aren’t that many players usually available at the trade deadline that can put up +.500 slugging – and there will probably be many teams in contention who are offensively challenged and feel (rightly or not) that they need to give something up in order to bolster their offense. I don’t think the Mets can get an A prospect for him, but I think they should be able to get a solid closer prospect or a solid position player prospect or a middle of the rotation starting pitching prospect for him.

        I’m looking at the Giants now, for instance, and they are desperate for offense. So are the A’s. Adding Beltran to the A’s would give them a pretty solid boost to their (so far) nonexistent offense. Remember a few years back the A’s traded Andre Eithier for 1/2 a season of Ray Durham, who was a good second baseman back then but not an elite one, and he didn’t slug like Carlos Beltran (I know he was a second baseman but still the point remains). Even the Matt Holliday trade to St Louis netted some serious prospects.

        What actually happens of course no one knows and it could range from the C prospects mentioned above to B+ prospects depending on team’s needs or perceived needs for offense, IMO.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • MC says:

        Woops wrong about the Either thing but you get my drift.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  13. ritz says:

    I’m sorry, but I can never get with this argument. Beltran has been fantastic over most of his career as a Met, as has Jose Reyes and KRod is a closer that pitches an inning whenever he does play. How can you place blame on 3 guys when baseball takes much more than that to win anything?

    How about focusing on the fact that Omar Minaya, offseason after offseason, felt the need to appease the fanbase by making a big splash in free agency rather than focus on plugging numerous holes in the roster and surrounding his great core with nice complementary players.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • MalteseFalcon says:

      Ritz, couldn’t agree more. Day after day I hear callers on the FAN saying we need to trade Krod, Wright, and Reyes despite their numbers, because they aren’t ‘winners.’ What does this even mean? Do they know it takes a roster of 25 men to win a championship, not a couple? It annoys me to know end. These guys when healthy, put up all-star type numbers, yet we should get rid of them because they don’t win. Boggles my mind.

      They didn’t win because Omar decided not to surround our cast with better complimentary players. Thats it. Remember last year? Frenchy, Matthews Jr. Cora, Tejada, Chris Carter. How can ANY team win with that?

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • JohnBlacksox says:

        The Mets bench sucked, but their “elite core” is grossly over-rated and flawed.

        Reyes has his head up his @ss half the time. Wright strikes out 200 times a year, and fields like ARod.

        Beltran left the bat on his shoulder for the biggest AB of his career. WTF was up with that?

        As much as you can’t win with a loser bench, it’s also true that you can’t win when your “best players” are Wright and Reyes. That’s been proven for the past 5 years. You can’t say one without the other.

        -9 Vote -1 Vote +1

        • Bemused Met Fan says:

          You seriously can’t judge Beltran based on one at-bat. Seriously just one at bat. I guess his 41 HRs, and .412 wOBA in 2006 didn’t help the Mets get into the postseason or anything.

          Yes, Wright is honestly overrated at this point, but he can still come back and have a few a good years, even if his best is behind him. We don’t know if it is though.

          Reyes has also been pretty good this year (.318/.364/.482 good for a .373 wOBA, 1.7 WAR). He looks like a 6-7 WAR player this year, so I don’t know what you are talking about.

          Nothing is proven by them not winning a championship. When the rest of the team sucks it’s hard to win. The Mets have the 5th Worst FIP in the league, and second worst pitching WAR as well this year. Their hitting is slightly above average, but the pitching is dragging them down, and the bench is pretty bad.

          All of the blame cannot be put on Reyes and Wright. They’ve had pretty good careers, it’s just too bad the rest of the team hasn’t produced.

          Vote -1 Vote +1

        • JohnBlacksox says:

          Actually, when players are involved in epic once-in-a-career at-bats, then yes, you can judge players on one at-bat.

          You can judge Kirk Gibson on one at-bat. You can judge Mookie Wilson and Bill Buckner on one at-bat. You can judge Bucky Dent on one at-bat.

          Unfortunately, Beltran falls into the same category. The Mets have had one chance to win the NLCS over the past decade, it all came down to one at-bat, Beltran, and he decided to leave the bat on his shoulder.

          To say that at-bat was no big deal is ignoring reality. It was an huge deal for this franchise.

          -7 Vote -1 Vote +1

        • Jason B says:

          “when players are involved in epic once-in-a-career at-bats, then yes, you can judge players on one at-bat.”

          You realize how ridiculous this is, right? I mean…really? It’s a good thing those truly awesome players – Mays, Aaron, Mantle, Joe D, Teddy Ballgame – never failed in any key at-bats, like, ever.

          Seriously, they all hit 1.000 in the postseason. Look it up.

          Vote -1 Vote +1

        • Jason B says:

          “Reyes has his head up his @ss half the time” – well that was very substantiated and factual.

          “Beltran left the bat on his shoulder for the biggest AB of his career. WTF was up with that?” – nice value judgment on 1 AB which represents about .0001% of his career. If he had only hit a homer, we could be discussing whether he would go into the HOF as a Met or a Royal!

          “it’s also true that you can’t win when your “best players” are Wright and Reyes. That’s been proven for the past 5 years.” – I like that you blame their few good players for not winning, rather than the dreck that they tended to run out there pitching…and at 2B…and…

          Vote -1 Vote +1

    • williams .482 says:

      i believe this was an ownership strategy, not Minaya’s, but your point stands.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  14. Random (Gay) Guy says:

    CircleChange11:

    You say that everyone can play first base. Apparently you never saw Mike Piazza try.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • lex logan says:

      But good heavens, Adam Dunn played an acceptable first base. Why assume a historically plus defender couldn’t make the transition?

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  15. Garrett says:

    Bingo to what Jfc said. I can’t buy into this line of analysis as 3.5 win players are not free agents in July. If they trade a healthy Beltran, it will be for more than a few bit prospects.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  16. jpg says:

    I get that Ned Colletti is a moron but if Cleveland can get back an uber prospect like Carlos Santana for Casey Blake then the Mets can do better than a couple of C level prospects for Beltran…….OK so Ned really is that stupid but still…..

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  17. CircleChange11 says:

    Evidently, one CircleChange11 is not enough for a forum.

    The more the merrier.

    (Insert joke here).

    *grin*

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  18. Anon says:

    17-20 in early May, and we’re already out of contention? Fail.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • JR says:

      7 games out, 7 weeks into the season. And showing so much promise!

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Jason B says:

      Being realistic about your postseason chances is a key component to the equation, too. Fans can be wildly optimistic – that’s why they’re FANatics, after all. The GM needs to make a more sober assessment and act accordingly.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  19. jim says:

    This seems ridiculous. Only C prospects for Beltran. Given the lack of offense this year and the close races in every division. It will take a lot more than C prospects to land Beltran. I know prospects are more highly coveted this year but give me a break. Beltran is on pace as mentioned in the article to produce almost 4 WAR this year. Even if you think he is average to slightly below average as a corner outfielder his offense alone warrants a better return for the Mets. If any GM on a competing team is unwilling to trade B prospects for a 30 HR, 40 2B, 100 RBI man then he should be fired immediately. What is the point to even playing the games then?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Jason B says:

      All depends on the amount of money that is or isn’t changing hands. That’s a big factor as well. And iffy health precludes Beltran from being a 30/40/100 man with regularity these days, which factors into the equation also.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  20. Grammar says:

    Why do you put ‘-ish’ on the end of at least one word in every single one of your articles? I am offended.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  21. LongTimeFan says:

    This is the problem with stat analysis in lieu of common sense, observation and all the immeasurable intangibles of a Carlos Beltran. Beltran is a great player, great teammate, and great person who plays the game right and with the utmost respect. He is not an object, not a piece of inventory subject to static measurement. Some of you, especially the writer of this article get way too carried away with sabermetrics. as be-all, end-all. making assessment with what appears to be sliver of actually observation.

    Anyone who thinks the Mets are trading him for C prospects, oughta be laughed out of town. Don’t insult the intelligence of Mets front office, Mets fans, and Beltran himself who has stated numerous times he wants to finish his career as a Met. He has full no-trade rights, and is not eager to step away. If forced because Mets would sign him to extension, don’t expect him to approve a trade if the Mets are being offered junk. This is how classy he is.

    And for those of you writing off the Mets at 18-20, 4.5 games out of the wild card, I say shame on you. If the Mets are in contention near July trade deadline, don’t be so sure anyone gets traded. This team is far better off signing both to extensions, Reyes for 4 or 5 years, and Beltran for two with base salary and incentive laden contract. Both players want to stay, and this long time Mets fans wants that as well. Whether that happens remains to be seen, especially with Beltran, but there are far too many pre-mature conclusions being drawn by both media and fans.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Wreck 'em Tek says:

      Couldn’t agree more. What these stat geeks neglect to consider is the human element. History has proven time and again that loyalty is one of the hallmarks of a Scott Boras client.

      +10 Vote -1 Vote +1

    • kick me in the GO NATS says:

      Mets have no money to sign anyone to extensions.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • diehardmets says:

        False.

        Oliver Perez, Luis Castillo, K-Rod, Reyes, and Beltran all come off the books. That’s about 50M freed up. Assume 16-18 of that goes to Reyes and still 32-34M is free. Assume half of that can’t be used and the Mets would still have 15M free, which is more than enough to sign Beltran to an extension if they so choose (I think he’ll be traded, but I’m trying to make a point).

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  22. Banger says:

    C prospects have minimal value. If that’s the best the Mets can hope for in return, they’re better off keeping Beltran.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  23. Nick says:

    Heyyyyyy Fangraphs – what’s Bautista’s trade value right now?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  24. Mike Cruz says:

    Carlos Beltran to the Rays is not a bad idea. He’s an experienced bat and glove for a young team overcoming big free agent losses and Beltran is only a short flight away from his home in Puerto Rico. The Rays could best utilize him in RF (can’t move him to another position when he is finally getting used to playing RF) and at DH (to rest him but keep his bat in the lineup). I would like to see Carlos get another chance to perform in the playoffs.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  25. eddie86 says:

    how about beltran and prospeat to the angels for ypoung pitchers ange ltorres and matt moore[both lefties].

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  26. CircleChange11 says:

    Ryan. Your opinion doesn’t match up with either common thinking or baseball history.

    Adam Dunn can play a passable 1B. I win. *grin*

    Look around the league, in regards to defensive demands, 1B is a half step above DH.

    Carlos Beltran is an elite talent. He was also probably a shortstop until he was 16. I’m guessing he could manage some ground balls and pop ups.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • kick me in the GO NATS says:

      I watched 100+ NATS games last season and I strongly disagree. Dunn was dreadful at first base and it affected the defense of the entire team. Notice without him how much better the same pitchers are pitching this season. That is not an accident!

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  27. CircleChange11 says:

    If we’re going to argue that 1B is a demanding position and a strong defender there is important, then I’m all in.I played 1st and pitched from t-ball through college before moving to RF/P. I think Hernandez is under-valued.

    But baseball history and metrics are quite clear which defensive position is the easiest to play. Did I go too far with anyone can play there? Perhaps. I will concede that not everyone can play 1B in MLB, but that most can.

    In regards to 1B being the easiest position to play, I’ll just let the research and history stand on it’s own and put the onus on anyone claiming something contrary.

    The point being made was that Zobrist is a very good defender that is more valuable at a position that is more important defensively.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  28. JohnBlacksox says:

    “C Prospects”??? You’re joking, right?

    The Mets already have 30 “C prospects”, there is no way they are trading Beltran for 1-2 more of them.

    Beltran has proven to be a top hitter again, and at least a passable fielder. A playoff bubble team would have to pony up to get him. Not to mention the fact that Beltran has the mystique of carrying the Astros through the playoffs when he was involved in the last deadline trade of his career. Teams and fans remember that.

    If the Mets are offered a couple crap minor leaguers for Beltran, then no deal, let Beltran walk at the end of the year.

    I agree that the Mets can’t expect to get a boatload of elite prospects for Beltran, but to say that they should be happy with a couple crap “organizational depth” losers, PLUS pay Beltran’s salary to boot? Are you insane? Why would the Mets ever make that deal? In a word: NO.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  29. phillyguy says:

    How about Joe Blanton and Ben Francisco for Beltran? Mets save some money, get a starting pitcher (mediocre, but better than what they have now) and an outfielder (awful as a starter, good as a reserve…IF they have a viable replacement in RF)…

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • diehardmets says:

      Typical Philly/Yankee fan mentality. We don’t want your crappy payers for our good ones! Blanton sucks and is a marginal (if any) upgrade to the Mets rotation. Pridie and Pagan are better than Francisco. Keep dreaming.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  30. idigapony says:

    Ryan,

    You really think 1b is the third most difficult position to play in baseball? I’d hate to see the left side of the infield that you run out on your teams.

    And Center fielder for that mater.

    What’s the first thing we learn to do when we play baseball? Catch. Cutting off balls in the gap, ranging to both sides in the hole, and throwing across the diamond to get out a streaking runner come much later.

    Oversimplification I know, but still, come on man. Can you picture Derek Lee at shortstop? naw. But I can picture Starlin Castro at first. Fast forward a few years and you’ll probably see just that.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  31. Paul says:

    This guy Matt is smoking some good stuff. Hall of Fame………the only way CB gets to the hall of fame is if he buys a ticket. I sread the article but when I got to that I realized that Matt is in love with him and not looking at this realistically.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Sylvan says:

      I’d say Beltran has a pretty good chance to make the Hall of Fame even if his superstar days are over. He has the peak, he just needs to stick around a few more years as a RF/DH and pad his counting stats for the voters. Beltran has had basically the same career as Andre Dawson so far, except with a better OBP.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  32. Jack McClain says:

    All this talk of the Rays…the Red Sox could use a bat…he’d look mighty good between Gonzalez and Ortiz…especially since Ellsbury isn’t all that good nor can he stay healthy.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • vivalajeter says:

      Well, the Mets essentially have the same run differential and the same record as the Sox (pending tonight’s results – they may have 1 less win). The Sox have 2 great teams in their division, and the Mets have 1. I don’t expect the Mets to make the playoffs, but it’s funny that the Mets are considered ‘sellers’ while the Sox are considered ‘buyers’, despite being in almost identical situations.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Jason B says:

        “The Sox have 2 great teams in their division”

        This year, I’m pretty sure the Sox have zero great teams in their division.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  33. robert says:

    beltran sucks. stay away other teams – mets fan for 21 years

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  34. phareastPhils says:

    more importantly, if most of us are in agreement that it would take more than 2C prospects for a half-year rental of Beltran, what would it take for the Phillies to get a guy like Delmon Young or Carlos Quentin?? I guarantee that is where the Phillies focus will be this offseason, as it gives them the flexibility to field one of these guys at a low cost for 2012 as well. Either one of these guys would be an upgrade, and would bring back better avg (young) or power (quentin) even given their defensive criticisms. Obviously neither has the relatively consistent offensive power that the switch-hitting Beltran has shown over the years, but the Phils would have a solid R-handed bat to put around Ryan Howard in the middle of the lineup. Ruben was lookin at Quentin in the off-season, and if the WSox are still at the bottom of the AL central I think a deal gets done….If Beltran requires more than 2 C prospects for half a season, what would 1 1/2 seasons of Young or Quentin cost in terms of prospects?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  35. CatchDog says:

    The only issue I see with Tron possibly going to the Rays is they play on that nasty plastic grass. Can’t be good on his knees. But the Rays have the prospect talent to acquire Beltran. And Reyes & KRod too.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  36. caseyB says:

    Judging Beltran on one AB in the playoffs is beyond ridiculous. I guess the OPS of 1.054 he had in that NLCS doesn’t matter. Nor the 8 HRs he had in the 2004 postseason.

    Fact is, Beltran has one of the most stellar postseason records of any active player. Only someone intent on devaluing him would focus on one AB where he failed to come through.

    Beltran has been one of the two best centerfielders in all of baseball while he was a Met. It’s too bad his bad knees have curtailed his career.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  37. Antonio Bananas says:

    I’m not sure exactly who he’s faced, but he does play in the best pitching division in baseball. He faces the Braves (2nd best ERA), Philllies (3rd), Marlins (like 8th), and Nationals (10th) more often than anyone else. I’ve been saying this for a while now but the NL isn’t the league without any hitting, the AL is the league without pitching. If Beltran is putting up good numbers in the NL East on the one team without good-outstanding pitching, what would he do in ANY AL division? In a more protected lineup no less.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  38. CircleChange11 says:

    Beltran tore up the LCS as an Astro. He’s not the only guy to be frozen by a Wainwright deuce.

    The only issue with Beltran is his future health.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current ye@r *