Curtis Granderson’s BABIP

New York Yankees center fielder Curtis Granderson is in the midst of his fifth full season in the major leagues. After performing at roughly a league-average clip at the plate in 2006 (.333 wOBA), Granderson went on to crush the ball in 2007 and 2008. The former third-round pick in the 2002 draft posted a .395 wOBA in ’07 and a .374 wOBA in ’08. Granderson’s bat, worth +1.2 runs above average during his first full season, jumped to +35.7 in 2007 and +23 in 2008.

Since then, however, Granderson’s lumber has been merely decent. He turned in a .340 wOBA last season (+6 runs above average), and he has a mild .318 wOBA (-1 run) during his first year in the Bronx. Granderson still possesses an above-average walk rate and good pop…

..but his BABIP has taken a big tumble. The lefty batter had a .333 BABIP in 2006, a .360 BABIP in 2007, and a .316 BABIP in 2008. His BABIP dipped to .275 last year, and it sits at .265 in 2010. Here are Granderson’s batted ball percentages over the years:

He’s hitting fewer grounders, and more balls classified as fly balls and liners. Fly balls have a lower BABIP than ground balls, but line drives fall for hits 72 to 73 percent of the time on average.

What are Granderson’s expected BABIP totals over the years? To help answer that, we can use this expected BABIP tool from The Hardball Times, based off the research of Peter Bendix and Chris Dutton. Dutton and Bendix found that hitter’s eye (BB rate/SO rate), line drive rate, Speed Score, pitches per PA and power all have a positive relationship with BABIP. The simple xBABIP tool uses a batter’s rate of home runs, stolen bases, line drives, fly balls, ground balls and pop ups to estimate BABIP. Here are Granderson’s actual BABIP and xBABIP totals since ’06:

While Granderson’s actual BABIP has been all over the place, his xBABIP has been fairly consistent. The exception is 2009, when his xBABIP was low due to a high rate of pop ups hit (13%, compared to a 7.6% career average and the 7-8% MLB average). His xBABIP is .310 this season, yet his BABIP is just .265. What gives? To shed further light on Granderson’s BABIP decline, here are his numbers by batted ball type over the years:

I highlighted the two biggest changes — Granderson’s BABIP on fly balls has gone from way, way above average to well below average. Further, his BABIP on liners is low this season. Here’s a graph that shows Granderson’s BABIP by batted ball type since 2006, compared to the AL average. The FB line falls off a cliff:

Granderson should show improvement in the second half of the season — his rest-of-season ZiPS calls for a .346 wOBA, with his BABIP climbing to .286. But I’m curious what you readers think, particularly Tigers and Yankees fans. Is Granderson doing something noticeably different at the plate over the past two years? Could it be related to his percentage of lefties faced, which is quite high this season (37 percent, compared to 28 percent in ’09, 25.3 in ’08, 19.7 in ’07, and 24.2 in ’06)? Do you buy the rest-of-season ZiPS BABIP, or do you expect something different?




Print This Post



A recent graduate of Duquesne University, David Golebiewski is a contributing writer for Fangraphs, The Pittsburgh Sports Report and Baseball Analytics. His work for Inside Edge Scouting Services has appeared on ESPN.com and Yahoo.com, and he was a fantasy baseball columnist for Rotoworld from 2009-2010. He recently contributed an article on Mike Stanton's slugging to The Hardball Times Annual 2012. Contact David at david.golebiewski@gmail.com and check out his work at Journalist For Hire.


73 Responses to “Curtis Granderson’s BABIP”

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
  1. Nick says:

    Granderson vs. LHP is the worst player in the AL. I’m not even overreacting, Granderson vs. LHP has a worse OPS than Gordon Beckham. I think it’s managers realizing how bad he is vs. lefties, and the Yankees continuing to trot him out there despite the fact he absolutely should not be playing vs. even the worst LHP.

    He’s been pretty decent on defense, is pretty good vs. RHP, and is super nice so I hope he does get it all straightened out :(

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Jon says:

      Gradnerson vs LHP .523 OPS

      Austin Jackson vs LHP .500 OPS

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Rich says:

        Curtis Granderson: 37% of PA against Lefties
        Austin Jackson: 28% of PA against Lefties.

        I think that pretty much makes Nick’s point:
        “I think it’s managers realizing how bad he is vs. lefties, and the Yankees continuing to trot him out there despite the fact he absolutely should not be playing vs. even the worst LHP.”

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Patrick M says:

        Also, Austin Jackson is Right Handed. One would actually expect him to perform better against left-handers (as he was during his minor league career, barely). Granderson has a huge problem with lefties and going the opposite way. Granderson tries to pull everything and hit it out of the park. The result is a lot of grounders to the right side of the infield or weak flyouts to the opposite field. He has a career .375 OPS when going the other way – thats just egregious.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Matt says:

      Adam. Lind is slugging .119 against lefties this year.

      One. Nine. Teen.

      Yes, yes, sample sample sample size.

      One. Nine. Teen.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  2. RPS says:

    Not sure how much it would impact his fly ball BABIP, but he was noticeably slower in the outfield in 2009. Especially towards the end of the season, he was having a lot of trouble getting to fly balls. It wasn’t a marked enough difference that it was glaringly obvious offensively, but a loss of foot speed is probably part of the puzzle.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Lance W says:

      That should only affect grounders though, I would think. I’ve still only seen Granderson play much this year though, being a Yankee fan, so I’m not sure what to make of this. That RoS projection sounds good to me.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Gilbert says:

      Not having eyeballed him my reply that loss of speed shouldn’t affect flyball BABIP, just groundball, but his flyball BABIP is the culprit. Maybe a spray chart would show whether OF have an easier time knowing where he hits the ball.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  3. Dick Whitman says:

    Granderson’s handedness splits are insane. .236 wOBA against LHPs versus .356 wOBA against RHPs. BABIP splits aren’t that different though. .259 versus .269 in favor of RHPs, of course.

    Career wise, he shows a much higher split in BABIP, .335 to .259 in favor of facing RHPs.

    If Kevin Long can’t help him be at least respectable against left handers, he may be nothing more than a platoon player for his career, which is really sad. Granderson makes Ryan Howard look like Barry Bonds out there.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  4. Rich says:

    Right now, Granderson has a career high O-SWing percentage, 24.3% (vs 21% career), and a lower than career Z-Swing percentage (61.7% vs 62.2%). His contact% is down this year, and his zone % is way down.

    My guess is that when hes getting himself into good counts, hes crushing the ball, but hes swinging at too much crap, getting himself into bad counts, and making weak contact.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  5. Sean says:

    I noticed the same thing.

    He has roughly a .240/.320/.420 line over the past calendar year. We’re not in sample size territory anymore. This is a pretty rough stretch for a guy who’s supposed to a young, all-star caliber player.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  6. Rich says:

    Whats really interesting is that Granderson’s LD% is actually higher against Lefties than Righties. It almost looks like he just has absolutely no power against lefties.

    GB-LD-FB-IFFB-HR/FB
    vL 27.3-25.5-47.3-3.8-3.8
    vR 35.4-22.2-42.4-4.8-14.3

    He hits way more fly balls vs lefties, but no homeruns. Essentially, hes popping out a crapload.His infield hit % is 14% against lefties, which I think is unsustainable, so it may even come down. He was at 8% the last couple years.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  7. Joe says:

    That trade sure looks one-sided at this point.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Different Joe says:

        It’s lop sided because Jackson is a stellar center fielder while Granderson is merely good. Oh yeah, Grandy also makes a boatload more and Coke would be a decent middle reliever for a fraction of what Chan Ho makes. That’s why it was a bad deal…

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Zack says:

      Let me guess, the last time you looked at Austin Jackson’s numbers was April?

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • cg says:

        That’s what I was thinking. Joe is probably Joe Beningo….

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Zack says:

        “Yo, bro, Pagan is better than Beltran”

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • And yet, Jackson is still running an absurd .423 BABIP. I don’t get this at all.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        Jackson is batting 70 pts higher than Granderson so not much has changed since April champ!

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Zack says:

        Austin Jackson OPS by month:
        .917
        .732
        .614
        .668

        Yup, nothing happening since April

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        Zak: during this same stretch Granderson hasn’t been better than Jackson, thus the trade favors the Tigers. No real math or sabermetrics needed for that conclusion.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        I also think it should be noted that in a comparison of Granderson and Jackson that Jackson is playing his first full season in the Majors. We should look at Granderson’s first full season in MLB to Jackson’s and build a track for Jackson’s career. Granderson as 6 yr vet should be better in all facets of his game over Jackson and that clearly isn’t the case. In 6 yrs will Jackson be a better players than 35 yr Granderson? My bet is probably yes since the 23 yr old Jackson is already a comparable player if not better than the 29 yr old Granderson. Yrs in the league and experience being up at the big level should only help Jackson continue to mature into a potential all star which no one has really mentioned yet in the comparisons of both players.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Zack says:

        The point is after April people were saying AJax was ROY and Cashman made the worst trade ever. Since then AJax was declined dramatically, and his BABIP is still over .400 I believe. And while Curtis does have his flaws, he has a history of production- and as this article shows, he’s in line for natural improvement with a low BABIP.

        That’s why you can’t judge a trade after a month, or three, or even a year, or two. At the time of the trade, AJax shows no power in the minors, and a huge strike out rate. Curtis was under contract at a reasonable rate, and has a history of production- in a huge ball park too.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        When you say a history of production your literally talking about 1 season 2007. That is why this trade was risky at best for the Yanks. Jackson’s contract would certainly give the Yanks more financial flexibilty for this and next season and he would become a huge trade prospect w/the emergence of Gardner and the potential of signing Crawford w/the money Jackson saves you at the league minimum. It is a fair statement to say the Yanks rushed this trade and because of that the early returns say this is a bad trade. Jackson outside of not hitting homeruns is more than a capable hitter who brings top level defense. Jackson is still a favorite to win the ROY and Granderson is out this point a platoon guy. How can you say this trade as it stands right now isn’t a bad trade? If Granderson can recapture his 2007 form than yes the Yanks will make out but isn’t just as likely that Jackson when he matures will develop a power? Also Jackson’s decline although predictable still puts him as a better player today than Granderson as all of his numbers are better but one …HR’s and how important are HR’s from a lead off hitter?

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  8. Disco says:

    I think it’s clear Granderson can’t hit lefties and many believe he is becoming a platoon player, but given the Yankees bench, is it worth it? Considering Granderson’s positive defense, is a player like Chad Huffman or Marcus Thames in left field good enough that it merits a benching of Granderson?

    I can see Thames playing against lefties, but his defense is so putrid, I feel like it would be wiser to deal with Granderson’s bat against lefties and take his defensive value. And if need be, PH Thames in a big spot (although I know the numbers for a PH, according to The Book, are really poor).

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • J.P. says:

      I see the argument, but the Yanks should be able to find a Bobby Kielty type somewhere that is cheap, can mash lefties and play a passable outfield. Even a -5/150 outfielder that can hit lefties would be a nice upgrade for them right now.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Nick says:

      I dunno, maybe a Willingham trade? DH him vs. RHP and put him in LF vs. LHP with Thames at DH with Gardner in CF.

      He’s not gonna light the world on fire with his LF defense, but LF defense isn’t the most necessary of defense. The Yankees won the WS last year with Johnny Damon’s horrific fielding.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  9. Sean says:

    Lefties are not the issue. It’s the .269 BABIP vs righties that are dragging down his overall line.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  10. CircleChange11 says:

    It could also be in how defenses are playing/shading him. If he’s pulling everything, he could make himself easy to defend.

    If you move your CF to right-center, and move your RF in (so you increase your odds of removing a hit at the expense of risking extra bases) and seemingly take away those “line drive hits” … you could also play your 2B deep, perhaps as deep as the IF line.

    Just as with the Jason bay power outage article/situation, this site needs to combine stat analysis with spray charts, such as what this gent did here (re: Granderson)

    Playing the Spray – Curtis Granderson
    http://www.detroittigersweblog.com/2009/11/playing-in-the-spray-curtis-granderson/

    This guy’s conclusions show that Grandy does outstanding when pulling the ball, and not so much when going the other way.

    So, that makes me wonder if defenses have adjusted and look to take away where his success is (pull). Much of the analysis at FG just results in the problem being defined (lower BABIP on LD and FB). We should explore deeper to find out “Why?”. It is defense scouting, bad luck, etc.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Joe says:

      That DTW piece is a great supplement to this analysis. Nice find.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • CircleChange11 says:

        Google Search: “Curtis Granderson Spray Chart”. First Hit.

        I was originally looking for Fox Sports spray charts (per stadium) for each player.

        I would imagine the authors here know of more/better resources than I do (If not, they’re screwed *grin*).

        I give Dave credit because rather than show “lower overall BABIP” than is far too common in “analysis”. Dave did narrow down to specific types of BABIP, and I suppose we could just end it there, but then no one really learns anything meaningful. Why is Granderson’s BABIP on LD and FB lower?

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • hank says:

      This is a great point about looking for the “why?”.

      In addition to defensive scouting/positioning (which is probably a small effect if real), I think scouting via how to pitch to him may also come into play here. With all his power to the pull side, would you ever throw something middle in, unless you were absolutely burying it inside? And playing in Yankee stadium likely exaggerate this.

      With all of that said he’s put ~150 balls in play this year, 4 extra hits would put his BABIP right around .300 It’s not easy to understand the 2009 data but the 2010 data on BABIP is a bit limited. The line drive delta from league average on 2010 is 2 line drives going for outs instead of hits.

      I know I’m beating a dead horse, but can we look at %’s AND sample sizes? (I’m referring to the 2010 #’s)

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  11. neboguy says:

    I just traded Granderson and Freddy Garcia for Ted Lilly and Andrew Bailey. I say sell while you can on his “star” name and Yankee status. If you remember, Granderson was high on a lot of people’s pre-season draft lists. However, keep in mind that Granderson isn’t batting 1st or 2nd anymore (although he has seen some time at 2nd lately). I believe this has alot to do with his GB/FB/LD %s. Simply put, he’s not merely trying to get on base anymore, but going for extra base hits to drive in runners, as he’s seeing more runners on base than he was with the Tigers. I’m pretty sure Granderson hit leadoff for most of his Tiger career.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  12. spock says:

    After reading thru the entire thread, I have to agree with CircleChange11: the addition of hitter spray charts to FG would be a dynamite enhancement to the data. FG is typically my “go-to” site for understanding 1) trend exceptions, 2) symptoms & root cause for #1. Instead of having to go to multiple sources afterwards, thus taking the reader a-w-a-y from FG, it would be more productive to include the spray charts (idea: integrate the GB/LD/FB data selects) by hitter.

    Afterall, FG has recently been described as the Sabr site where all the “cool kids hang out”!

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  13. spock says:

    …follow on to CircleChange11 suggestion for spray chart addition to FG: Joe Sheehan recently posit’d continuing evidence of a “structural” shift is underway within baseball that’s associated with the decline in run scoring. Could it be we are witnessing a major shift similar in nature to 1993 with the availability of new HR friendly ballparks & the “juiced” baseball (ie, Dr Lathan’s work)?

    FG with the spray chart addition could be at the forefront of the next wave of illuminating what exactly is causing that run scoring shift from some of the hypothesis within the forums:

    1) System wide, effective use of available data to optimize defensive positioning prior to the pitch since as H&R or SB utilization declined?

    2) Batters pulling the ball more in an attempt to justify the $$$ after their big F/A contract or immediately before their 1st arbitration eligible periods?

    3) Pitching adjustments, aka increased CUTTER use, to combat HR focused swings + maple bats with late breaking lateral movement away from hitter’s sweet spots?

    4) Runs Created, Vorp, WAR, etc. – Have they all combined to create inherently more selfish ball players who are optimized individually, but not fundamentally as a cohesive team designed to consistently attack & break down Oppo SP/defenses? (think of roles in NFL offenses as e.g.)

    I firmly believe, FG’s interface to be light years ahead of most data centric sites available for Sabr.

    The addition of the spray charts would be a very effective addition to the FG existing GB/FB/LD trend charts by hitter.

    With that change, FG can visually empower a whole new crop of fan Sabr analysis & wider adoption by the broadcast/print media due with clearer understanding of the game we all love (and love to argue about who’s better and why)!

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  14. Chip says:

    Just last night Curtis hit an absolute laser off a lefty right at the shortstop. It seems to be the tale of this season for him.

    It seems to me from watching him is that he just loses his patience completely against the lefties. He swings out of his shoes early in the count and then softly grounds out to the left side later in the at-bat. He needs to take the approach that Cano started taking over the past few years, just poke that outside pitch into left

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Brian says:

      Granderson probably would take that approach but he isn’t good and Cano is a stud so that explains that difference.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  15. I know this post focuses exclusively on BABIP, but BABIP’s only useful when the ball’s being put in play. To get the full picture on Granderson’s overall struggles at the plate this year it’s also helpful to note that he’s striking out more frequently (24.3% K%) than he has since 2006 (29.2% K%) and also walking less frequently than he had been the past two seasons. So yes, while we can expect his BABIP to improve going forward, he’ll need to cut down on the Ks for there to be a significant change.

    Fortunately for Curtis there’s still plenty of season for him to bring his numbers up to where many of us expected they’d be, although I don’t know if there’s any hope for him against lefties — he looks uncomfortable and awkward almost every time he faces a southpaw.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Brian says:

      Where did we expect his numbers to be? He batted .249 last year and has only one season over .300! He isn’t a good hitter and his defense has been on a steady decline since 2007. This is just a bad trade and I am a die hard Yankee fan.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • evo34 says:

        Where is your evidence that he is playing bad defense this year? He has been above avg. by any metric, and is a good hitter for a CF (despite this year’s outlier BABIP).

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        Evo34 his defense has been on a decline since 2007 when he was rated at his highest. This year he is not playing excellent D or even in the conversation of being gold glove worthy but the guy he was traded for is, although he probably won’t win it. Teammates of Jackson on the Tigers are raving about his defense and most of those guys played with Granderson so that about says it all right there. Also notice in my first comment I didn’t say he was a terrible defensive player or even playing poorly on the defense but I was merely making a note that his defensive stats have declined since his highest season in 07′. 3 yrs of decline isn’t a small sample size.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        Also Evo34, his outlier BABIP? That has been in a steep decline for the past 3 seasons as well. The only outlier is his one great season in 2007 which by now we can safely assume he will never repeat again. Granderson is a 1 hit wonder. Nice guy, hard worker but far from a star and that is why you do not trade high end prospects for guys who are platoon players in their prime. At 29 yrs of age is there any reason to safely bet that Granderson will find his 2007 stroke and become a star again? Jackson at 23 can easily continue to build on a solid rookie season and work on lower his K rate. Granderson has had issued striking out for 6 big league seasons and has never been able to hit lefties. The Yankees have a line up full of lefty hitter who good to great against lefties and Granderson is the one outlier.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  16. Jerry Fletcher says:

    Something you brainiacs never seem to factor in is that he’s facing different pitchers in the AL East vs the AL Central. His skills are declining also because he was hurt (hamstring) although it may not directly be affecting his swing his power is off and last time I checked the legs generate the power stats. Check out Nelson Cruz here on hamstring problems and how he’s done since being activated from the DL. Another intangible is that he’s trying to justify playing him everyday and is trying too hard. I don’t see his game improving one iota and if he’s relegated to being a platoon player then he’s irrelevant in terms of fantasy baseball. I wouldn’t be surprised if they put him on the DL again sometime after the July 31st trade deadline. I also wouldn’t be surprised if the Yankees traded him ala Melky Cabrera to another NL team for pitching help, especially BP.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  17. Jeff says:

    From a strictly naked eye standpoint, in 06-08 Granderson was a flat swinging line drive hitter…

    in 09 he had a huge uppercut swing… his swing became just like Inge’s uppercut swing… this i believe is because of the Tigers hitting coach Loyd McClenndon, who is the worst in baseball… He ruined grandersons swing and now is doing the same to Austin Jackson…

    Jackson in april had the EXACT same swing plane that granderson did in 07…. now he is starting to have a slight uppercut… Grandersons uppercut is huge now..

    GOD PLEASE LET THE TIGERS FIRE THEIR HITTING COACH!!! DONT LET THEM RRUIN JACKSON LIKE THEY DID GRANDY!!!

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  18. Brian says:

    Granderson is simply not a good baseball player and the Yanks never should have made a trade for a player who should be platooned for a lefty on a regular basis and at 29 yrs of age is not going to get any better.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Kevin S. says:

      How can you justify claiming a guy who has never posted fewer than 3 WAR in a season is “not a good baseball player.”

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Kevin S. says:

        ?*

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        Is Granderson a 3WAR player right now? We will he continue to be a 3 WAR player in the small sample size he has from his 4 yrs in Detroit? Has he shown you any signs that he can be the player he was in 2007? My opinion is that Granderson is in regression and what you see him doing now is what he will be for the rest of his career and I know Omar Infante is an All Star but I doubt Granderson will make an All Star as a bench player moving forward in his career and I doubt he will maintain his 3WAR avg from his first 4 seasons that you guys count.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Kevin S. says:

        In ’07, he was worth seven wins. Stop bringing up the fact that he’s not the monster he was that one outlier year to obscure the fact that he was still a 3+ win player in each of ’06, ’08, and ’09, and if he maintains his current pace, he’ll hit it again (assuming he doesn’t repeat his first-half DL stint).

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        Is your only argument that Granderson is a good player because he was 3WAR player? He only gets that grade because he is a CF which is why WAR is an overvalued metric. Before Granderson pulled his groin he was batting .226! Now he is batting a whole 2 pts higher! I guess when he finally gets healthy he will be the exact player he was last year a .249 hitter who K’s at an alarming high rate gets on base at a below average level and plays to an even or negative defensive ranking. But at least you have your WAR to keep you comfortable at night.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  19. Big Time Street Meat says:

    ok here’s the deal….i do not care what any of you geeks and your made up statistics that have absolutely no place in baseball say about granderson….he is an average at best ball player…cannot hit lefties, gets terrible jumps on balls in the outfield, he doesn’t get on base, therefore cannot steal bases….to some things up….if we signed him as a free agent and still had melky, gardy, swisher and AJAX….granderson would be a 5th OF’er!!!!!! Sincerely, Master Street Meat

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Brian says:

      I agree w/Master Street Meat…it is really cannot be explained by numbers how bad Granderson has been this year for the Yanks. I said this on this site back when the trade was made that AJAX was already better than Granderson since he is 23 yrs old and can fix the issues that have been plaguing Granderson he came into the league.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  20. Brian says:

    Guess whose stats these are:

    Player A: .253 2 23 .312 .324

    Player B: 228 7 23 .305 .411

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • vivaelpujols says:

      Your slut mother’s?

      -8 Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Wow says:

        I enjoy reading the comments on these articles as they are often as insightful as the article itself (and, quite honestly, I enjoy hearing all sides of the argument).

        But why does this site allow Mr. “VivaElPujols” to continue to destroy threads and degrade posters? All it takes is one reading of most any comments section to see how much of a jackass this guy is. And to the FanGraphs ‘powers that be,’ allowing such an idiot to continue to spew his garbage will prevent your readers from being more interactive and vested in your site.

        Do the readers and commenters on this site a favor and lose this idiot once and for all. He’s turning your site into a joke.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Brian says:

        easy buddy, noticing the time stamp it looks like you had your first beer….congrats.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  21. Joseph says:

    It’s not that big of a deal, relax. You must be an old person if you’re on the internet and you find that comment shocking.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  22. Brian says:

    Just a note: Shouldn’t an everyday starting player batting .228 w/an OBP of .305 be expected to improve in the 2nd half of the season? Is math really needed to show that an improvement is expected? The guy is a bust right now if he doesn’t improve he will be playing for Pittsburgh in 3 weeks. Once again no equation or equations needed that is simple reality.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • DT says:

      can you shut the fuck up..stop crying like a little girl over Granderson. You don’t bother reading the article or make any intelligent comment besides Grnaderson suck. You ignore the fact the guy is having low luck despite a hitting more Line Drives. Also you say his defense is in decline ignoring the fact he’s currently leading the yanks (aside from cano) in UZR and not that far off the Jesus of baseball AJax. So stop fucken trolling.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  23. Sean L says:

    Brian, I think you’re overstating the case for Austin Jackson. Many scouts believed he could be a Granderson-caliber player in 2-3 years. Curtis Granderson is Curtis Granderson now. If I had to guess (and that’s a dangerous game when you’re playing with limited information), I’d say Cashman viewed that deal as a way of accelerating Jackson’s timetable. By dealing for a player he believed was performing at or above AJax’s ceiling, he was able to get Jackson’s production without having to wait 2-3 years for him to develop.

    Minor league numbers supported that decision. Granderson consistently slugged around .500 with an average OBP of .380 in 400+ career games in the minors. AJax had one good BA-driven stretch of 65 games in which he slugged above .560 but otherwise hovered in the .400 to .420 range. He’s not any more patient than Granderson either, as his walk rate peaked at 10% in the minors and is currently just 5.9% (Granderson’s walk rate was 10.1% last year and 11.3% the year before that).

    Of course, AJax doesn’t have Granderson’s extreme platoon split, but he also doesn’t hit as well against right-handed pitchers (or at least not when Granderson is hitting like himself), and before this year he was decidedly a step down from CGrand on defense.

    For Yankee fans, it’s unfortunate to see Jackson develop as quickly as he has while Granderson struggles, but it’s not as if Granderon’s contract is an albatross. And, as others here have said, Granderson was a 3-win player even after his flukishly awesome 2007 season. Given the information on both players’ BABIP, I’d expect Granderson to be the better player for the rest of this year and next, with AJax overtaking him for good in 2012.

    If that happens, the trade’s basically a wash–not the disaster you’re making it out to be.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • DT says:

      Actually Ajax does have Granderson’s extreme splits:
      .200/ .253/ .247 for lefties

      Granderson’s numbers are practically the same except for a higher .slug

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  24. this guy says:

    Granderson won’t be a Yankee in 2011. They will unwind this mistake the first chance they get.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  25. AJF says:

    I’m Yanks fan and watching Granderson has been frustrating, it seems like he’s getting behind in the count too much of the time – an awful lot of 0-2 and 1-2 counts against him. Though this could just be selective memory on my part. Anyone know where to check for stats to see if this really is the case?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  26. You can definitely see your skills in the paintings you write. The arena hopes for even more passionate writers like you who aren’t afraid to say how they believe. At all times go after your heart.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>