Daily Notes, Feat. a Summary of Shelby Miller’s Debut

Table of Contents
Here’s the table of contents for today’s edition of Daily Notes.

1. A Brief Note Regarding the Regular Season
2. Summary: Shelby Miller’s First MLB Start
3. Forthcoming Games

A Brief Note
It might have occurred to the reader — as it did to the author, last night, as he started writing these very same Notes — that the 2012 regular season is now over. There is really nothing to recommend this state of affairs.

Brief Summary: Shelby Miller’s First MLB Start
What Happened Last Night
Last night, top Cardinals prospect Shelby Miller (after five September relief appearances) made his first major-league start — and did so in front of the straight-on Cardinals center-field camera.

Miller’s Line
Miller was entirely proficient in his starting debut. To wit: 6.0 IP, 21 TBF, 7 K, 2 BB, 3 GB on 11 batted-balls (27.3% GB), 3.97 xFIP. Also, he and the Cardinal defense allowed just a single hit — albeit, not against what the most imposing version of the Cincinnanti offense. Miller threw 52 of 72 pitches (72.2%) for strikes. (League average for starters is ca. 63%, with a standard deviation of ca. 2.5%.)

A Note on Miller’s Fastball
As he did in his real-live major-league debut — and has done in his appearances since — Miller generated a number of swing-and-misses on his fastball. Per Texas Leaguers, Miller got whiffs on eight of his 51 total four-seam fastballs, or about 16%. The league-average whiff rate on fastballs is about 6%. Miller’s swinging-strike on fastballs is currently at 13.0%.

Most Overpowering Fastball
Here’s footage of Miller’s hardest fastball (93.7 mph) that was also a swinging-strike — to Drew Stubbs in the fifth inning:

Most-Breaking Curve
This curve by Miller — an 0-1 pitch to Chris Heisey in the sixth — was both the slowest (78.6 mph) and most-breaking of all his curves. It was also, according to PITCHf/x, a pitch that is sometimes called a strike.

A Comment on Miller’s Curve, Generally
It probably wouldn’t be unfair to suggest that what is referred to as Miller’s “curve” — given its velocity (high-ish) and lack of overall break — to suggest that it’s somewhere close to the hypothetical dividing line between curve and slider. Question: might, then, one refer to the pitch as a “slurve”? Answer: that’s a decision for each of us to make individually and according to our own effing constitutions.

Data from Brooks Baseball was helpful in writing this.

Forthcoming Games
NL Wild Card Game | St. Louis at Atlanta | 17:00 ET on TBS
Kyle Lohse (211.0 IP, 101 xFIP-, 3.6 WAR) faces Kris Medlen (138.0 IP, 76 xFIP-, 3.9 WAR).

AL Wild Card Game | Baltimore at Texas | 20:30 ET on TBS
A mysterious someone faces Yu Darvish (191. IP, 85 xFIP-, 5.1 WAR).



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Carson Cistulli has just published a book of aphorisms called Spirited Ejaculations of a New Enthusiast.


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craigjedwards
Guest
craigjedwards
3 years 11 months ago

While the Reds lineup may not have been as focused as they normally would have been given the lack of stakes, the starting lineup looked pretty close to what I would expect to see in the playoffs.

stan
Guest
stan
3 years 11 months ago

The Reds’ starting line-up was the best they could field. They pulled a bunch of starters early but by then the Cards’ bullpen had taken over anyway. Miller’s performance was tremendous. I can’t quite figure out how he does it. His fastball velocity and movement aren’t very special yet no one can square them up.

GG
Guest
GG
3 years 11 months ago

I didn’t see last night and they only showed one fastball, but his fastball movement was great in the minors. He had above average velocity but it was heavy and had down and in to righties. Perhaps his fastest fastball was overthrown a bit and his other fastballs had better movement?

Baltar
Guest
Baltar
3 years 11 months ago

“he and the Cardinal defense allowed just a single hit”

Thank you, Carson Cistulli, for fulfilling my dream. Finally, an actual live sportswriter has given the other 8 players on the team the credit they deserved for a 1-hit performance.
I guess all the other writers still think there was only 1 guy, the pitcher, on the field when the opponent was at bat.

Irrational Optimist
Guest
Irrational Optimist
3 years 11 months ago

The slurve line still has be laughing.

jrogers
Member
jrogers
3 years 11 months ago

“Slurve” is a good word, but I still prefer the “slutter.”

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