Delmon Being Delmon

Delmon Young’s last few weeks has carried quite a bit of hype and it seems to be all for naught. Young’s fantasy stock has shot up I suppose, but over the last four weeks his line was .280/.299/.520. The slugging is certainly impressive – eight of Delmon’s 21 hits were either doubles or home runs during the span – but that’s a .819 OPS. How often do you see players with ISO almost higher than their OBP?

Hit Tracker lists five of his eight home runs as “Just Enoughs”, which is pretty self explanatory in nature. Not all of Young’s home runs are pull jobs that barely clear the fence though. Only two of his home runs have gone to left field with the rest going into center and on – his weakest of the bunch – heading out to right field. During the recent hot streak he slammed a 447 foot bomb off Jarrod Washburn in Comerica, but Hit Tracker has that affected heavily by wind and temperature.

To make matters worse Young is striking out 26% of the time – a clear career high – while walking 3% of the time – a clear career low – oh and he’s still swinging out of the zone around 40% of the time. We know he’s not very good at defense either which means even if this hot streak were representative of the true Delmon Young, and it’s not, he’s basically what you get when you take Miguel Olivo and tell him to play the corner outfield.

MGL wrote on a similar player a week ago when he addressed Jeff Francoeur’s recent banner week, adding that taking a small high point in a disappointing player’s season as proof they’re on the upswing is faulty. It seems like the same phenomenon that occurred in that case is repeating itself here. Young had the tools and minor league numbers, but it seems his work ethic will be the fault of his career unless things change quickly.



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Nick
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Nick
6 years 9 months ago

“MGL wrote on a similar player a week ago when he addressed Jeff Francoeur’s recent banner week, adding that taking a small high point in a disappointing player’s season as proof they’re on the upswing is faulty”

But isn’t that you are doing here? Before the season started, the projection systems feature on this site pegged him to be roughly a league average hitter. However, due to his horrid walk rates and his slow start to this season, people have the impression that he is some kind of an abomination, when he really isn’t that bad (although obviously not living up to his potential). It seems rather hypocritical to say that his recent hot streak is meaningless, when you are putting so much stock in his cold streak to start the season.

Bob R.
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Bob R.
6 years 9 months ago

But I don’t read R.J. referring to either player as an “abomination”. I read him saying that the recent high point does not prove either is on an upswing, i.e. that both remain what they have been-disappointing players given expectations and tools.

I suppose you could interpret the Olivo comparison to mean he thinks Young is terrible, but that is not implicit. A league average hitter who was a #1 draft pick playing the corner outfield is a disappointment. The “stock” is not in the cold streak to start the season but in the 3+ years of performance.

Nick
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Nick
6 years 9 months ago

Good point

Mike I
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Mike I
6 years 9 months ago

Even when he’s a league average hitter, his defense and positional value make him a replacement-level player. He’s terrible.

Joe R
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Joe R
6 years 9 months ago

Is Delmon signed to an MLB contract? I think I read that on here once, which may explain why he continues to hack at everything in the bigs rather than fix it in the minors. It’s obvious he’s not a good enough contact guy to Vlad-it up at the dish.

The Fonz
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The Fonz
6 years 9 months ago

Yup, Dave did a piece on him in June and mentioned he came in with an MLB contract after the draft. Yuck.

Joe R
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Joe R
6 years 9 months ago

After the draft? Not calling you wrong, obviously, but he did spend 2 full and the better part of a 3rd season in the minors before being called up. Was it a contract with the condition that he couldn’t be sent down once he was called up? Or am I just dumb to how contracts work in this aspect?

Ron
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Ron
6 years 9 months ago

He can be sent down. He has 4 opton years in his contract, or 4 seasons in which he can be sent down to the minors (without having to clear waivers).

Joe R
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Joe R
6 years 9 months ago

fangraphs is telling me one thing, you’re telling me another.

Officially confused.

Better do actual work and clear my head.

Ron
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Ron
6 years 9 months ago

He was given an MLB contract after the draft. Three or four option years are standard in that sort of contract. Basically his MLB contract status just means that he is guaranteed a fixed MLB level salary for those years (so there is less incentive for the club to keep him in the minors) and he has to stay ont he 40-man roster. At least that’s my understanding of it.

Davidceisen
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Davidceisen
6 years 9 months ago

Players with major league contracts can be sent down to the minors, but all of Delmon’s options have been used up. The question is: Would anyone claim him?

Rob
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Rob
6 years 9 months ago

The point if a major league contract is the player is put on the 40 man roster and uses an option immediately. Its not so much the money aspect as the fact that it severely limits how long a player can be int eh minors. In general (there’s a bunch of exceptiosn depnding on age the player signed and other things) a player signed can spend 3 years in the minors before needing to be added to the 40 man roster and then has 3 option years. A major league contract eliminates those non-40 man years and forces the player to the majors much sooner which means acquiring service time much sooner.

John
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John
6 years 9 months ago

The minute a player is placed on a 40 man roster, his option years begin – regardless where is currently assigned. During those three years, he can be brought up to the major league club and “optioned” back to the minors as many times as the club wishes (the 10 day rule for non injury related recalls notwithstanding – if you’re sent down, you have to spend 10 days back in the minors before you can be recalled – exception – you are being recalled to replace a ML player just put on the DL – then the 10 day waiting period no longer applies). There are no set number of options. He is only given a fourth option year if it is felt there is some discrepancy and both MLB and MLBPA concur.

As for the age limit? A player who signed at age 18 must have 4 years pro experience before he must be placed on the team’s 40 man roster. A 19 year old when signed? Three years.

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