Don’t Worry About a Cubs Crowd that Doesn’t Exist

Based on the chats that we host, these things seem to go in waves. This past spring training, it felt like one of every two questions asked about teams trading for Nick Franklin. Once the season got underway, everybody was wondering when the Pirates would finally call up Gregory Polanco. And now there’s a new and different question of the moment: what are the Cubs going to do with all of their prospects? The situation appeared to be a little bit crowded even before the organization added Addison Russell and, less notably, Billy McKinney. Now there are people wondering when the Cubs are going to diversify.

I’ve dealt with this in a few consecutive chats. I think Dave has also done the same. But it seems like a topic worthy of a dedicated post. If all the players were to stay where they are, and if they all were to develop well, then the Cubs would have quite the crowd on their hands. At the moment, though, it’s a crowd that doesn’t exist. It’s a crowd that exists only in theory, in some possible future out of infinite possible futures, and therefore the Cubs aren’t facing any kind of urgency.

For a quick overview, the Cubs have Starlin Castro embedded at shortstop, and he’s had a bounceback season. He’s 24, and he’s got a 2020 team option, so he could be around through the decade. The Cubs are fond of the player he’s become. Then there’s the incredible crop of prospects:

And you can throw in Billy McKinney, who just last summer was a first-round draft pick and who owns a minor-league OBP of .358. He’s played center and right field, and he turns just 20 in a month. The Cubs have other good prospects as well, but they’re either catchers or pitchers and so they don’t factor in to this perception of over-crowdedness. This looks like a complicated situation. This looks like a team that needs to make a move to clear out some space, given the positional overlap.

But the Cubs don’t need to hurry to do anything, and you can get to that conclusion in two different ways. Maybe you think about how prospects aren’t guarantees to succeed. Maybe you think about how prospects can change positions. Either path leads to the same place, and both approaches are valid. The Cubs are smart enough to keep both things in mind, and that’s why they’re not the least bit anxious. That’s why they’re presumably rather pleased with themselves, current wins and losses at the big-league level aside.

Not a single one of you needs another reminder that prospects can up and bust in a hurry, but, here we are. Let’s look at Baseball America lists from 2000, 2005, and 2010, for funsies. Let’s look at each list’s top ten position players. The list from 2000 included Ruben Mateo, Sean Burroughs, Dee Brown, and Corey Patterson. The list from 2005 included Delmon Young, Ian Stewart, Joel Guzman, Casey Kotchman, Andy Marte, Lastings Milledge, and Dallas McPherson. The list from 2010 included Jesus Montero, Dustin Ackley, and Justin Smoak. Also, Alcides Escobar, who’s flirted with being a defensive specialist. The three Mariners might still work out, but to this point they’ve been just about nothing. They look like three individually spectacular busts.

The benefit of collecting a bunch of prospects isn’t that all of the prospects will work out. It’s that more of your prospects will work out than you’re seeing in other, thinner organizations. You can take it straight from Theo Epstein:

“We’re realistic about the fact that not all prospects work out,” Epstein said.

Let’s look at the players the Cubs have. They’re all, obviously, phenomenal talents. But let’s look for some potential blemishes, just because we know they’re not perfect. In Triple-A, Baez has a 62% contact rate. That’s tied for the lowest in the league, and it’s lower than what we saw from George Springer. Baez swings hard and doesn’t walk, and if he doesn’t develop, this could very easily be why. Bryant, in Triple-A, has a 63% contact rate, albeit with better contact than Baez has. Bryant feels like more of a sure thing, but still, he’s not flawless.

Russell has barely played above Single-A. The same goes for Soler. Almora’s still in Single-A and he hasn’t performed like someone as polished as his reputation has previously asserted. His OPS right now is south of .700. McKinney isn’t thought of as a top prospect, and Alcantara could stand to refine his approach. Though he’s taken steps forward in 2014, he has yet to dominate any level, which is something some evaluators look for.

For the sake of fun and simplicity, let’s look at just the Cubs’ top four prospects right now. Let’s say each one has an 80% chance of developing into a good big-league regular. Then there would be just a 41% chance that all four players develop well, meaning there’d be a 59% chance of at least one flaming out for whatever reason or reasons. That’s too simple, and each player doesn’t have an 80% chance, but it’s meant to drive home a familiar message: this crop isn’t collectively going to achieve its ceiling. It’s a virtual guarantee that for one or more of these players, things will go wrong.

How about the other approach? The Cubs have a lot of good players currently playing similar positions. A neat thing about defensive positions is that they aren’t genetic. They aren’t programmed into a player; everything is flexible, negotiable. Jim Thome was drafted as a shortstop. B.J. Upton used to play shortstop. Kenley Jansen used to play catcher. Chris Young used to play basketball. It might be one thing if the Cubs had a stockpile of quality young first basemen, but having too many good athletes gives them a lot of ways they can go.

Epstein, from the article linked above:

“You can never have too many shortstops,” Epstein said. “They end up all over the field.”
[…]
“The good thing is these guys can all fit on the field together, and that would be a very impact group,” Epstein said.

Castro, right now, is a shortstop. As he gets older, maybe he moves to his left or his right. Baez, right now, is a shortstop, but some see him as a second baseman, and he could even shift to the outfield. Russell, right now, is a shortstop, but there’s thought he might grow too big as he matures. Bryant’s a third baseman who might end up in right field. Alcantara’s already shown his flexibility, and Almora’s a center fielder while Soler looks like a right fielder. McKinney, should he develop well, seems to have left field in his future.

Not every player can fit on the same field at once, that much is true, given that Anthony Rizzo is locked in at first base and none of these guys are backstops. But some of these guys are closer than others, and some of these guys might not be able to make it, and all the flexibility means holes can be filled as they need to be filled. The most pressing question people have is what the Cubs will do at shortstop, but short is the most demanding position on the field, and a decent shortstop has the skills to be a decent anything.

Here’s a table of Fan Scouting Report results from 2013. These capture overall league averages.

Position Instincts First Step Speed Hands Release Arm Strength Arm Accuracy Overall
2B 55 55 53 53 54 46 56 53
SS 60 61 59 58 59 60 57 59
3B 55 50 46 54 54 56 53 53
LF 44 51 54 44 44 45 46 47
CF 56 66 70 56 51 44 48 56
RF 50 53 55 50 50 54 53 52

Shortstops have the highest rating in Instincts, Hands, Release, Arm Strength, Arm Accuracy, and Overall. They’re second in First Step and Speed. If a player has demonstrated that he has the ability to play a competent short, then his tools should translate to other positions, given a bit of seasoning. An enormous number of current big-league non-shortstops are converted shortstops. Even if the Cubs elected to move a good defensive shortstop to another position, chances are that player would be even better at the new spot, relative to the rest of the league.

As JD Sussman recently said:

Positional adjustments will be important to determine whether the Cubs can get more value in a trade for one of their infielders than the value they would get from one’s performance boost at a lesser position. However, the notion that, shifting these talents down the defensive spectrum hurts their value to the Cubs isn’t beyond reproach. With the amount of infield talent the Cubs have, another trade is expected, but hardly necessary.

A year ago, people weren’t sure what the Rangers would do about their infield logjam. Despite regularly starting Adrian Beltre, Elvis Andrus, and Ian Kinsler, they managed to give more than 300 plate appearances to Jurickson Profar. Over the winter, Kinsler was moved in part to make some roster space. But Profar’s been hurt and hasn’t played, and Andrus hasn’t done anything to bounce back at the plate, owning a 77 wRC+ since the start of last season. The point being, things happen. Injuries can happen. Disappointments can happen. Regressions can happen. Sometimes you can see a crowded situation coming, but crowded situations result from a number of players simultaneously doing well, and we just can’t count on that as much as we’d like to. Not sustainably, not for very long.

Maybe, down the road, the Cubs will have something of a crowd in the infield and the outfield. Should they get there, it’ll be because they’ve really excelled with their player development. The probability right now is that they’ll have more than enough room for the players who continue to get better. The temptation is to see prospects as the best things they could become, but that hardly ever comes true. So the Cubs should be more than content to sit back and see where these talented players go. They don’t need to rush to diversify, because they don’t have too much of the same things. They might eventually have too much of the same things, but that’s not the same dilemma, and in fact it’s not a dilemma at all. If anything, it’s a blessing. You don’t draft for need because you don’t know what your needs will be by the time the draft pick is ready. And you don’t preemptively make a point of trading from system depth, because system depth and actual depth are two distinctly different things.




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Jeff made Lookout Landing a thing, but he does not still write there about the Mariners. He does write here, sometimes about the Mariners, but usually not.


80 Responses to “Don’t Worry About a Cubs Crowd that Doesn’t Exist”

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  1. Castillo C, Rizzo 1B, Castro 2B, Russell SS, Baez 3B, Bryant RF, Soler LF, Alcantara CF. That’s what the Cubs should be looking at by the end of next season with all these guys listed at AA or higher.

    That leaves Almora, Scwarber (most likely not a catcher), McKinney, Villanueva, Vogelbach, etc. as trade bait, or replacement options.

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    • Jake says:

      Yes, and as this article proved, all of those prospects will reach their potential. So, your scenario seems likely.

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      • John says:

        He still makes a good point – that list can be looked at as a best case scenario. Recognizing that likely won’t work out, the other players are listed as replacement options for one that doesn’t work out, or trade bait. Having more means more will pan out. And the team can spend money to fill spots where prospects don’t work out.

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        • Wil Myers says:

          And the Cubs will need trade bait to get the pitching they need to complement their core of young hitters.

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      • My point was there’s no logjam at all.

        Those players at AA or higher that I mentioned will all be at the major leagues next year barring injuries or something going massively wrong. Are they all going to pan out? Not a chance, but they can all play together and they all will get a shot at the major league level.

        So the Cubs don’t need to do anything with their so called logjam… because they can all fit together for now, and when some don’t pan out, there’s replacement options coming right after.

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      • Tony says:

        He said that’s what they should be looking at by the end of next season, not for the next 10 years.

        Castillo, Rizzo, Castro and Alcantara are already in the majors. Baez and Bryant are knocking at the door. Soler is tearing up AA (small sample size) and has a contract where it doesn’t make sense to keep him in the minors, Russell will start the year in AAA most likely. Regardless of whether they make it at the major league level, they are all in a position where it seems very likely they will all see the majors, so if they flame out it will be at that level.

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    • qnix says:

      Clearly, the article was too long for some readers

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    • Chuck P says:

      Castro stays at short, no brainer. So far I only see Bryant and
      possibly Alcantara as so called sure things for 2015. The rest need more seasoning and possibly position changes.

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      • Cornflake5000 says:

        I think it’s a no brainer that Russell takes over SS and Castro moves to second or is traded for pitching.

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    • Puig's Translator says:

      Great Article. It is somewhat similar to the “Problem” the Dodgers had going into this year. Everyone was going nuts because of how many Outfielders we have. But having a lot of talented players is not really a problem, even when they are not prospects because of injury,slumps, etc. Oh no! Van Slyke is amazing and Joc Pederson is dominating AAA, what are the Dodgers going to do? Ha ha

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    • Duhize says:

      The Cubs will fill in the failures and pitching thru a combination of trades and money. Don’t forget the Cubs are stockpiling tons of cash and when the Wrigley renovation and new contract are done they will be flush with cash too. that’s a great position to be in…although they clearly have to convert it to have it be ruled successful

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  2. Steve says:

    I think you have to include Kyle Schwarber in this group as well. I think the consensus is he will not stick at catcher and end up as a bat first left-fielder.

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  3. Steven Gomez says:

    “The list from 2010 included Jesus Montero, Dustin Ackley, and Justin Smoak.” A wink-nudge from Jeff to fellow Mariners fans. [pukes]

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  4. Royals Yost says:

    Thanks for this. Even *if* all their current T100 prospects work out I can see a scenario where they all have a home, to say nothing of the probability that the don’t.

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  5. Preston says:

    The logjam isn’t a log jam because the players are at different levels. Castro is an established MLB player, Alcantara and Bryant are succeeding at AAA. Those three can all easily fit in the INF together. Baez needs a lot of work offensively at AAA before he’s ready, if and when that happens the Cubs will have a much better idea of what the MLB future of Bryant and Alcantara is. Russell is great prospect, but has played all of 20 games at AA. His big league debut isn’t imminent. It won’t be a problem because if a back log happens it means the MLB infield is full of productive talented young players and they have more successful young MiLB on the cusp of the MLB that they can trade to fill out the rotation.

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  6. Charlie says:

    Not one of these prospects will bust.

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  7. Tom says:

    Oh how quickly we forget the KC Royals of a few years ago with the “Greatest Farm System Ever.”

    1. Eric Hosmer, 1b
    2. Wil Myers, c
    3. Mike Moustakas, 3b
    4. John Lamb, lhp
    5. Mike Montgomery, lhp
    6. Christian Colon, ss
    7. Danny Duffy, lhp
    8. Chris Dwyer, lhp
    9. Aaron Crow, rhp
    10. Brett Eibner, of

    Now, I am not a “prospects are unproven!” guy, at all. Of course they’re unproven, but they still have tons of value. But I also groan every time I see a fan of whatever team “projecting” that team’s lineup or rotation 3 years down the road and it’s literally all current prospects. It doesn’t work that way, and I can’t believe this needs to be pointed out to smart people.

    I also feel like fan bases of perennial losers like the Cubs and the Royals are particularly susceptible to it and are even more sensitive when you point out that they, maybe Javier Baez having the exact same profile as Brandon Wood is not a good sign.

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    • Some Guy says:

      Schwarber > Hosmer
      Soler > Myers
      Baez > Moustakas
      Vizcaino > Lamb
      Bryant > Montgomery
      Russell > Colon
      ALmora > Duffy
      Albert Pujols > Dwyer
      Miguel Cabrera > Crow
      Mike Troutn = Eibner

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    • Kyle says:

      Javier Baez doesn’t profile all that well to Brandon Wood. No more than he does to a lot of players who didn’t bust.

      Picking out the worst vaguely comparable comp and repeating it isn’t really a great process for analyzing prospects.

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    • inkinn7 says:

      Baez has always been a high-risk, high-reward prospect. But he really doesn’t have any more in common with Brandon Wood than he does any other high-k, high-power prospect, whether they’ve gone on to success or failure.

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  8. Chris Young says:

    Where is basketball on the defensive spectrum?

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  9. Mike Z says:

    The best part of being a Cub fan now is MILB box scores. Almora appears to be a heats up in July guy and Soler doesn’t want people to forget him.

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    • Steven says:

      Almora’s stock has fallen. Scouts now think he will be lucky to hit .320/.360/.460 with plus defense in centerfield. And Soler doesn’t project to be much more than a slightly above average hitter, so he’s probably more of a .280/.340/.520 hitter than a true .310/.370/.550 hitter.

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      • Preston says:

        If those were the outcomes for either Almora or Soler the Cubs front office would be ecstatic. No A ball prospect legitimately projects to hit .320 (there are currently 9 players in all of baseball doing this) or slug .520 (there are currently 14 players doing that). Kris Bryant destroyed AA, and has kept it up so far in SSS at AAA while the same age as Soler (who has all of 15 games at AA) and I would consider .280/.340/.520 to be a success for him.

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      • milhouse538 says:

        What scouts are saying this? They must think extremely highly of the two.

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      • Aaron Trammell says:

        His stock his falling, so he’ll only hit like a borderline MVP candidate? Sucks to be him…

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      • Psy Jung says:

        Joke Dragon whooshing over the heads of the street crowd

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      • LG says:

        Clearly somebody hasn’t seen the modern run environment

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  10. tz says:

    Just off the top of my head, here are some guys that came up as shortstops:

    Gary Sheffield
    Greg Jefferies
    Tim Salmon
    Cory Snyder
    Julio Franco
    Chipper Jones
    Michael Young
    Michael Morse
    Miguel Cabrera
    Justin Upton
    Mark Reynolds

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    • BenRevereDoesSteroids says:

      Also, Ian Kinsler who was mentioned in this article, was moved to 2nd base because the Rangers had Michael Young. Yep.

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      • tz says:

        At least when the Reds moved Billy Hamilton (whom I also forgot) because of Zack Cozart, they did it because of a plus defender (and presumably also to lower the risk of Hamilton’s million $ legs getting hurt turning the DP)

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    • Samuel Sumner says:

      Also B.J. Upton

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    • Hank G. says:

      Danny Tartabull

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      • tz says:

        Wow, forgot about Tartabull. He could lead the strikeout brigade of one-time shortstops, along with Gorman Thomas and Ron Gant.

        And also, the last person I ever thought would have been a shortstop at any point in his career:

        Matt Stairs

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    • joser says:

      Even Buster Posey started out at short in high school.

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  11. BenRevereDoesSteroids says:

    “Also, Alcides Escobar, who’s flirted with being a defensive specialist.”

    Sure, his BABIP fluctuates pretty wildly from year to year, but this year and 2012 he has been pretty valuable at the plate. For a shortstop, at least.

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    • Kris says:

      Yeah he already has 2 WAR accumulated this year, not really a bust imo given his defensive abilities.

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      • Dan Ugglas Forearm says:

        Agreed. Montero, Ackley, and Smoak already make that top-10 look awful enough, there was no reason to include Escobar.

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  12. Eric M. Van says:

    It’ll be very interesting to see how many of these guys do bust, because Epstein (and Hoyer) place a greater emphasis on makeup than most, and had a distinctly low bust rate with Boston. I think the two are likely related. 80% may actually be realistic.

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  13. Mr baseball says:

    Cubs are being run like a small market team

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    • tz says:

      That’s part of how the Red Sox finally got to the top. Of course, Duquette did a real nice job of getting the ball rolling with his experience in bargain-bin hunting from his Expos days, before Theo locked in the rest of the rebuild.

      If the Cubs can find their own Pedro…..

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    • Dan Ugglas Forearm says:

      That’s what’s scary about the Cubs. They’ve got small market smarts and big market pockets. When it makes sense for them to spend, they can throw money around with the best of ’em.

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      • tz says:

        And here’s what’s even scarier about the Cubs retooling than the Red Sox retooling:

        No crazy big $ division rival like the Yankees to drive up a bidding war = much lower chance of a Carl Crawford type overpay. Not saying Theo hasn’t flubbed any big $ signings, but I’m totally convinced in the case of Crawford he just couldn’t stand the thought of the Yankees landing the perfect two-way LF for their team/ballpark.

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    • inkinn7 says:

      Which makes sense in the initial years of rebuilding from the ground up. Their plan is pretty clear: get a core of young, cheap, valuable players (and as the article suggests, odds are that at least a few of the current prospects will join Castro and Rizzo), and when these are ready for the big leagues use big-market money to fill in the team around them.

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  14. Jon B. says:

    As a Cubs fan, here’s my thoughts on the guys talked about in this article. I don’t know if they are realistic, but hey.

    1. Kris Bryant – He’s the one guy I really think is “sure” to hit. I love the way he’s dominating every level. That’s what players who come up and become superstars do.

    2.Addison Russell – It’s hard to evaluate him because of the way he’s bouncing around the minors. He’s certainly not dominating his levels, but he’s doing well particularly for his position. Over large sample sizes he seems to do fine. I think he can make it as a major leaguer, but presenting him as a future all-star may be too much.

    3.Javier Baez – Absolutely terrifies me. He reminds me way too much of Brett Jackson, our “centerfielder of the future” who has spent the last few years in the minors trying to keep his head above the Mendoza line. The power is legit. The ability to be an acceptable major-league hitter is suspect.

    4. Arismendy Alcantara – I honestly believe he is legit. He has some serious gap power and I love the mix of homers and other extra-base hits (in AAA this year he has 10HR, 11 triples and 31 doubles). I don’t think a .270+ batting average and above-average OBP is out of the question to go with good defense. I really like him.

    5. Albert Almora – He scares me. Being a good-not-great hitter in the low minors isn’t somebody I’m comfortable projecting into a major-league role. I realize he’s young, but that is true of every player on this list.

    6. Jorge Soler – He seems like a legitimately strong prospect who could have a legitimately strong career — but that’s conditioned upon his actually being able to stay on the field. In three years, he has played 110 games so far.

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    • BrewCrewFan says:

      Good comments, and I agree with you 100%.

      Soler/Almora seem like guys I think will do some very good things in Chicago for a long time. If you’re also interested in checking out my baseball site, we would love to have you: http://www.homerunheroics.com

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    • tz says:

      I agree with all of these except Baez. I had thought of his downside as being Brandon Wood, but then I realized that the kid was just 21 when he first played in AAA (Jackson was 23). His numbers are turning a corner, and I think he will gradually develop major-league average plate discipline if given enough patience.

      And you don’t teach that kind of power.

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      • Dan Ugglas Forearm says:

        Average plate discipline may be generous. But with his power, his plate discipline may not quite need to be average. If he can develop MLB average discipline, he’s going to be amazing.

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        • tz says:

          True. He could be very good even with Josh Hamilton type plate discipline. But he still has a way to go to even get there. The Cubs can afford some patience with his development as a hitter.

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      • Puig's Translator says:

        With enough patience he will develop patience. Just focus in on the positive and ignore all red flags because he is young.

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    • inkinn7 says:

      I wouldn’t be scared about Almora yet. He’s been bad most of this year, but fwiw (not much) is OPSing .993 the last 28 days. And, as you say, he’s young.

      Mike Cameron age 20 in A, .589 OPS
      Kenny Lofton age 21 in A-, .559 OPS
      Shane Victorino, age 19 in A-, .628 OPS

      Too soon to fear.

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  15. BrewCrewFan says:

    Cubs are going to have a great future. The hitting potential on that team is just crazy, and I think Theo will be able to attract some pitching FA’s to keep the team competitive. (www.homerunheroics.com for a great baseball messageboard)

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  16. Rob says:

    The question is not which prospects will pan out. It is can Theo , Jed, and Jason identify which ones will ultimately struggle in the majors, and sell high on them while they are still well regarded minor leaguers. So far, I like our GM/Prez evaluation skills, and I think that they will soon begin the process of sorting the wheat from the chaff-much like the Braves were so good at in the 90s. I would like them to package a minor leaguer with Starlin Castro and get David Price from the Rays if they can do a sign and trade. Sign Max Scherzer in free agency, and you have you pitching staff set for the next five years, barring injury. Then you need four of our best young hitters to pan out, and we have a contender.

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    • dirck says:

      I think Casro plus a prospect would be a huge over-payment for Price .Price is 5 years older than Castro and will be much cheaper than Price will be for the next five years ,even if the Cubs could re-sign Price .If they can’t re-sign him ,then the trade is sheer idiocy because the Cubs aren’t going to be contenders next year with Price .To give away a proven 24 year old shortstop who is signed to a reasonable long term deal for a 29 year old pitcher over whom you have one year of control when that pitcher will not even make your team a contender within that year makes no sense at all .

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      • joser says:

        Agree — the Cubs shouldn’t be in on Price at all. 2015 is not yet their year, so why throw away value on a rental for it? (They could try to re-sign Price, of course, but there’s no guarantee he’ll stay or that he’d be the best use of their FA dollars if he did)

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  17. Where’s the Goat rank on the prospect list?

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    • Jason B says:

      Grades out really poorly on the 80-point scale. Hands, arm strength, and arm accuracy all grade out very, very poorly. On the other hand he has a nice head butt, which isn’t considered one of the traditional five tools but may come in handy if a catcher insists on blocking the plate, or if he runs in from the bullpen during a donnybrook. And he poops pellets all over the infield, which is decidedly an unconventional approach.

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  18. Johnny Ringo says:

    Cub fans should check out a site called “Cubs Den”, they have fantastic writing there. Head writer John Arguello noted that with all of the defensive shifts in baseball, it’s not a bad thing to have 3 guys who are shortstops, at 3rd, SS, and 2B.

    It was an extremely valid point with the changing game.

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    • tz says:

      And ex-SS’s like Machado, Pedroia, Kinsler, Grich, Alomar, etc. are your best bets for getting Gold Glove caliber defense at these positions.

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  19. LHPSU says:

    You could make a case, however, that if Castro continues to hit pretty well, that he should be traded anyway just to maximize his value. After all, it’s not every year that the Yankees have a hole at shortstop…

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    • EL says:

      The “waves” of prospects are supposed to be arriving for the Cubs beginning in 2015 and there’s zero incentive for the front office to give away surplus value.

      What exactly close-to-the-majors tradeable assets do the Yankees control to make a Godfather offer possible? For a team on the cusp of contention to move a 24 year old three-time 3+ WAR shortstop who is signed to a steal of a contract even if he doesn’t improve a whit from the current season?

      2015: $6M, 2016: $7M, 2017: $9M, 2018: $10M, 2019: $11M, 2020: $16M team option ($1M buyout)

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    • dirck says:

      The Yankees have nothing of value to offer in a trade for Castro,except maybe Tanaka,and I doubt that they would part with him unless his current injury is very serious ,in which case he has little value anyway .

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    • fjtorres says:

      The Yankees next regular shortstop is more likely to be Asdrubal Cabrera than Starlin Castro. Not that that is the likeliest scenario these days…

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  20. Jhonny Manzana seed says:

    I completely expected this to be about the cubs’ lower attendance issues this year, and how it wasn’t a big deal.

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    • joser says:

      Wendy Thurm is working on that article right now, and it will have exactly the same title.

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  21. Steve-O says:

    Where can I find MiLB contact rates?

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