Financial Cost Of Tommy John Surgery To Young Pitchers

Jose Fernandez. Patrick Corbin. Jarrod Parker. A.J. Griffin. Luke Hochevar. Matt Moore. Brandon Beachy. Cory Luebke. Bruce Rondon. Bobby Parnell. Kris Medlen. Ivan Nova. And now Martin Perez. Top and mid-tier pitchers in the early stages of their professional careers who have had Tommy John surgery this season, or in the case of Perez, are about to have it. Then there’s Matt Harvey, Jonny Venters, Dylan Bundy, Alex White and Eric O’Flaherty, who went under the Tommy John knife last season. For these pitchers, the surgery and rehabilitation will consume critical service time in their careers when they would otherwise be building up value for their arbitration-eligible seasons or free agency.

So while we lament the loss of these talents to our favorite team and to the game, the players face a troubling question: how will Tommy John surgery and the typical 12-18 month recovery time affect their short-term earning power?

Let’s start with the “lucky ones”: Matt Moore, Martin Perez, Cory Luebke and Dylan Bundy.

Moore is in the third year of a five-year contract with Rays. He’s guaranteed $2 million next season and $5 million in 2016. If he returns 12-18 months after his surgery, he’ll be ready to pitch midway through next season, and have all of 2016 to regain his form before the Rays have to decide whether to pick up Moore’s $7 million option for 2017.  Perez is in just the first year of a four-year deal with the Rangers. Even if he misses all of 2015, he’ll be paid $2.9 million in 2016 and $4.4 million in 2017, and have plenty of time to get back on track before the Rangers have to decide on his club option for 2018. Luebke just had his second TJ procedure — the second during the life of his four-year contract with the Padres. He’ll have pocketed close to $7 million and pitched only 31 innings between 2012 and 2014.  Depending on when he returns in 2015, he’ll have less than a full season to prove the Padres should pick up their $7.5 million option for 2016.

Dylan Bundy is even luckier. He signed a major-league contract with the Orioles after Baltimore selected him fourth overall in the 2011 amateur draft. Bundy’s contract pays him $1.245 million a year over five years, through the end of the 2016 season. After that, he’ll have three years of arbitration eligibility. So Bundy’s 2013 Tommy John procedure shouldn’t set him back too far as he works to build up value ahead of his first year of arbitration eligibility in 2017.

Reliever Eric O’Flaherty is also in decent shape. He had Tommy John in last May and became a free agent at the end of the 2013 season. The Athletics signed O’Flaherty to a two-year/$7 million deal before this season, with the understanding he wouldn’t be ready to pitch in the majors until after the All-Star break, at the earliest. That will give O’Flaherty at least a full season in 2015 to enhance his value before becoming a free agent again.

The financial future for the other 2013-2014 TJ pitchers is much less clear.

This chart provides the service time and salary details for the five key pitchers that underwent Tommy John in 2013:

Pitcher Service Time Entering 2014 2013 Salary 2014 Salary Contract Status Entering 2015 Contract Status Entering 2016
Dylan Bundy 1.015 $1,245,000, 3rd year of 5-year contract $1,245,000, 4th year of 5-year contract $1,245,000, 4th year of 5-year contract $1,245,000, 5th year of 5-year contract
Matt Harvey 1.072 $498,750 (pre-arb) $546,625 (pre-arb) pre-arb 1st year arb
Alex White 2.092 $497,100 (pre-arb) $502,000 (pre-arb) 1st year arb 2nd year arb
Jonny Venters 4 $1,625,000 (1st year arb) $1,625,000 (2nd year arb) 3rd year arb 4th year arb
Eric O’Flaherty 6.062 $4,320,000 (last year arb) $1,500,000, 1st year of 2-year contract $5,500,000, 2nd year of 2-year contract free agent

Alex White is in the most precarious position, as he’ll be entering his first arbitration year with a nearly blank slate over the last two seasons. Matt Harvey will have at least all of 2015 to reestablish himself as an ace before hitting his first arb year. As a reliever, Venters shouldn’t expect much more than his 2014 salary in 2015. As it is, the Braves agreed to pay him the same this season as last season, even after the TJ procedure.

The outlook is even dicier for several staff aces who went under the knife earlier this season.

Player Service Time As of 1/1/2014 2014 Salary Contract Status Entering 2015 Contract Status Entering 2016
Bruce Rondon 0.103 $505,000 (pre-arb) Pre-arb Pre-arb
Jose Fernandez 1 $635,000 (pre-arb) Pre-arb 1st arb year
Martin Perez 1.038 $750,000 (1st year of 4-year contract) $1,000,000, 2nd year of 4-year contract $2,900,000, 3rd year of 4-year contract
AJ Griffin 1.102 $505,000 (pre-arb) Pre-arb 1st arb year
Patrick Corbin 1.105 $515,000 (pre-arb) Pre-arb 1st arb year
Jarrod Parker 2 $500,000 (pre-arb) 1st arb year 2nd arb year
Matt Moore 2.107 $1,000,000(3rd year of 5-year contract) $2,000,000, 4th year of 5-year contract $5,000,000, last year of 5 year contract; team option for 2017
Brandon Beachy 3.014 $1,450,000 (1st arb year) 2nd arb year 3rd arb year
Ivan Nova 3.024 $3,300,000 (1st arb year) 2nd arb year 3rd arb year
Cory Luebke 3.033 $3,125,000 (2nd year of 3-year contract) $5,250,000, 3rd yr of 3-year contract Club options for 2016 ($7.5M), 2017 ($10M)
Bobby Parnell 4.132 $3,700,000 (3rd year arb) Last year arb 1st year free agency
Kris Medlen 4.137 $5,800,000 (3rd year arb) Last year arb 1st year free agency
Luke Hochevar 5.151 $5,210,000 (3rd year arb) Last year arb 1st year free agency

Jarrod Parker of the Athletics is most at risk, as he’ll miss all of this season and then be arbitration eligible this winter. I looked back at the salary history of top to mid-tier starting pitchers who had TJ surgery dating back to 2007, and didn’t find anyone in precisely Parker’s situation. A quick look at Baseball-Reference’s “most similar stats” list for Parker shows A.J. Griffin and Daniel Hudson, who are also recovering from TJ surgery, and Alex Cobb, who will enter his first arbitration eligible year this offseason, too.

Rondon, Fernandez, Griffin and Corbin will face similar issues, depending on how quickly they recover and how many innings they pitch in 2015, the last season before they each become arbitration eligible. I can see Fernandez and Corbin pointing to the first year arbitration salaries of Max Scherzer ($3.75 million in 2012), Justin Masterson ($3.825 in 2012) and David Price ($4.35 million in 2012) to establish a baseline for their first year arb salary, but the system is based on comparable players, and those guys weren’t injured when they got those deals. Rondon and Griffin will have fewer comparables still.

Beachy, Nova, Medlen, Parnell and Hochever have their 2014 arb salaries as a baseline, but they may not necessarily see those same figures from their teams this winter. That’s precisely what happened to Charlie Morton, who needed TJ surgery in 2012, his first season of arbitration eligibility. He and the Pirates had agreed on a $2.45 million salary for 2012, but heading into 2013 Morton was still rehabbing his elbow. His 2013 salary dropped to $2 million.

Here’s the list of pitchers who had TJ surgery between 2007 and 2012, with information on their salaries and contract status in the years following the procedure:

Player Year of TJ Service Time in Year of TJ Salary Year of TJ Salary Year After TJ Salary 2 Years After TJ Salary 3 Years After TJ
Josh Johnson 2007 1.027 $382,000 (pre-arb) $390,000 (pre-arb) $1,400,000 (1st year arb) $3,750,000 (2nd year arb, part of 4-year contract)
Jaime Garcia 2008 0.047 split major-minor contract $400,000 (pre-arb) $400,000 (pre-arb) $437,000 (pre-arb)
Jordan Zimmermann 2009 0.154 split major-minor contract $401,000 (pre-arb) $415,000 (pre-arb) $2,300,000 (1st year arb)
Edinson Volquez 2009 1.059 $440,000 (pre-arb) $445,000 (pre-arb) $1,625,000 (1st year arb) $2,237,500,000 (2nd year arb)
Stephen Strasburg 2010 0.118 $2,000,000, 2nd year of 4-year contract 2,500,000, 3rd year of 4-year contract $3,000,000, 4th year of 4-year contract $3,900,000 (1st year arb)
Kris Medlen 2010 0.137 $407,500 (pre-arb) $429,500 (pre-arb) $490,000 (pre-arb) $2,600,000 (1st year arb)
Jenrry Mejia 2011 1 split major-minor contract split major-minor league contract $494,925 (pre-arb) $509,675 (pre-arb)
Brett Anderson 2011 1 $1,000,000, 2nd year of 4-year contract $3,000,000, 3rd year of 4-year contract $5,500,000, 4th year of 4-year contract $8,000,000 club option exercised
Kyle Drabeck 2012 0.071 $485,900 (pre-arb) $499,500 (pre-arb) In minor leagues
Danny Duffy 2012 0.085 $487,750 (pre-arb) $505,125 (pre-arb) $526,000 (pre-arb) 1st year arb
Drew Hutchison 2012 0.128 split major-minor contract $493,200 (pre-arb) $503,000 (pre-arb) 1st year arb
Brandon Beachy 2012 1.014 $495,000 (pre-arb) $510,000 (pre-arb) $1,450,000 (1st year arb) 2nd year arb
Cory Luebke 2012 1.033 $500,000, 1st year of 3-year contract $1,000,000, 2nd year of 3-year contract $5,250,000, 3rd year of 3-year contract Club options for 2016 ($7.5M), 2017 ($10M)
Josh Tomlin 2012 1.069 $494,500 (pre-arb) $501,800 (pre-arb) $800,000 (1st year arb, lost arbitration) 2nd year arb
Charlie Morton 2012 2.01 $2,445,000 (1st year arb) $2,000,000 (2nd year arb) $4,000,000, 1st year of 3-year contract $8,000,000, 2nd year of 3-year contract

Ben Lindbergh raised an interesting scenario over at Baseball Prospectus on Thursday. He suggested that teams with young pitchers who’ve had TJ surgery and are straddling the pre-arb and arb eligible years approach those pitchers about signing a long-term contract — before the pitchers get back on the field. The advantage to the pitcher is gaining some financial security when faced with tremendous uncertainty. The advantage for the team is to lock down a top-tier pitcher for a relatively low cost before he re-establishes his pre-surgery value.

It’s a long road back from Tommy John surgery. And while teams have every incentive to provide the best medical care and rehab for their pitchers to get them healthy and back on the field, those same teams will use the TJ procedure — and the missed innings — as a reason to hold down future salaries.



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Wendy writes about sports and the business of sports. She's been published most recently by Vice Sports, Deadspin and NewYorker.com. You can find her work at wendythurm.pressfolios.com and follow her on Twitter @hangingsliders.


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Shawn Young
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Shawn Young
2 years 3 months ago

That’s useful stuff.
Thank you very much.

Remus
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Remus
2 years 3 months ago

Its not a lot of money, but one wonders if teams will stop extending young pitchers as much as they did last off-season

attgig
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attgig
2 years 3 months ago

how about pitchers who go under the knife while still in AAA. probably a little hard to project, but how much does it delay their time in the big leagues, and how much does it set them back.

vivalajeter
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vivalajeter
2 years 3 months ago

It should be much worse for them. At least Harvey, Fernandez, Bundy, etc, will accrue major league service time while rehabbing, so it doesn’t impact when they have their first year of arbitration, or when they reach free agency. If you had surgery in AAA just before getting called up, it would delay things significantly.

Nick
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Nick
2 years 3 months ago

That is precisely the situation facing Jameson Taillon. I agree with vivalajeter, the timing is atrocious from Taillon’s perspective as it delays his reaching arbitration, free agency, etc all by one year potentially ultimately losing a year of free agency money on the back end as a result of the lost year while still in AAA.

Yikes
Guest
Yikes
2 years 3 months ago

Saw the title and quickly (and foolishly) thought:

“Who cares how much the surgery costs (i.e., medical fees) given how much money is at stake – has to be de minimis in the overall scheme of things!”

I should have known Wendy would write a much more important article than that.

This is great – thanks.

Roger
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Roger
2 years 3 months ago

I had similar thoughts, except I’ve been thinking lately about the decisions facing guys like Jeff Hoffman and Eric Fedde in the draft: should they go pro now to have a team covering their rehab costs and have more financial certainty and get a year closer to being required to be on a 40man to avoid rule v (though neither is expected to still be in the minors at that point anyway), or stay in school and try the draft next year? I would like to see that article, but this one is useful too.

Nick
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Nick
2 years 3 months ago

I’d think they have to accept the MLB money even if it is only a fraction of what they would have received per-TJS. If the do not then they will just be getting back on the mound post-surgery in May 2015 or so. That does not leave much time to prove health and effectiveness to boost value before the 2015 draft. If they can’t improve their stock before next year then they might as well take the money now.

joser
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joser
2 years 3 months ago

Something else teams have to factor in when considering to offer a long-term contract to a young pitcher in rehab from TJ (and for the pitcher to factor in when considering taking such an offer) is that the TJ procedure is not 100% reliable (though a lot of people think that it is). In fact, according to Drs. Lewis Yocum and James Andrews, its overall success rate is actually about 85%.

vivalajeter
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vivalajeter
2 years 3 months ago

Yeah, that was a big point in the Baseball Prospectus article. They cited the 85% rate, and the pitchers who haven’t really recovered. That’s why the team should be able to get a bargain basement rate – so that the player at least gets some guaranteed money, rather than being like Daniel Hudson and “washing out without ever making much more than the major-league minimum.”

Roger
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Roger
2 years 3 months ago

I don’t think it should be bargain basement, but 15% off seems like a good deal for both sides. Maybe the team needs it be 25% off, but when the team starts talking 40-50% off I think the player should walk away.

Matt Perez
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Matt Perez
2 years 3 months ago

While Dylan Bundy did sign a major league contract he was optioned to the minors before he was injured. As a result, he was placed on the minor league DL and therefore isn’t earning service time while he’s injured. Entering 2014 he only had 15 days of service time as per Cots Baseball Contracts.

Even though he signed a contact lasting until 2016 he will not be eligible for arbitration until he has three years of service time. Stephen Strasburg is a recent example of this. He signed a major league contract that expired before he had three years of service time. As a result, the Nationals renewed his contract with a 20% decrease. The Orioles did the same with Jeremy Guthrie in 2009.

Roger
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Roger
2 years 3 months ago

At least he’s burning option years, getting him closer to forcing the issue of being in the majors. Not as valuable as building service time directly, but it’s something. Already having a major league deal probably also means his salary is already more on par with a pre-arb major leaguer than a typical minor leaguer.

Spit Ball
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Spit Ball
2 years 3 months ago

He’s making 1.25 a year for 5 years. That’s more than “on par” with pre arb players. They make 500,000-550,000 until they hit arbitration these days. That is unless they are a projectable talent and are willing to cough up 2-3 free agent years as club options.

Scott Marcus
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Scott Marcus
2 years 3 months ago

A bit off topic. But has anyone considered that maybe some PEDs — in small amounts, and possibly tested in an MLB approved manner — might help reduce the number of TJ surgeries? Obviously not any kind of proof, but I think it is interesting that the number of TJ surgeries seems to be increasing very quickly as we get further removed from the Steroid Era. I’m wondering if any teams or baseball people have considered looking into this. It could be a coincidence, by maybe some of the juice could help reduce pitcher elbow injuries.

Bip
Member
Member
Bip
2 years 3 months ago

First off all, creating a consistent, meaningful distinction between the drugs and procedures that are commonly accepted and those that will condemn a player in the eyes of the media and many fans is basically impossible. The current rule resembles “assistance in returning to the field is ok, but assistance on the field is not”, though of course there are exceptions to this. Maybe the rule is more like “if the drug seems like something you’d see in a superhero movie about engineering super-soldiers,
then it’s banned.”

Things that can be construed as PEDs are currently used, so the question is whether the currently banned PEDs may be allowed for the sake of preventing injury. I can’t imagine that they will. I think that if bans are loosened, it would only be for players already recovering from surgery, or those who are on the DL with precursor symptoms. I highly doubt they’d allow a player to pitch while using a currently banned substance.

GMH
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GMH
2 years 3 months ago

Given the number of PED suspensions last season, how can anyone argue with a straight face that baseball is far removed from the steroid era? Putting that aside, in 2002, 38 MLB pitchers underwent Tommy John surgery. In 2013, 23 MLB pitchers underwent Tommy John surgery. I don’t see sufficient evidence that would support even a correlation, since presumably one would put 2002 at or near the peak of the so-called steroid era.

Bip
Member
Member
Bip
2 years 3 months ago

I thought from the title that this would be an article about the cost of the increasingly common TJ surgeries performed on high school and college pitchers. I think that is an article definitely worth doing.

This is a good article, but the thing I might have liked is a comparison with some pitchers that didn’t have TJ surgery, to see how the surgery impacted what they were actually paid.

So, for example, Jose Fernandez’s 2013 is actually quite similar to Clayton Kershaw’s 2009 in terms of performance. Kershaw in 2009 was only 4 months older than Fernandez was in 2013. Kershaw, over his next two pre-arb years, demonstrated a gradual improvement of which Fernandez is completely capable. In 2012, Kershaw signed a 2-year contract that bought out his first two arbitration years, the first for $8.5 million. So, if Fernandez misses 2014, and shows improvement in 2015, then whatever he receives for his first arb year can be compared against Kershaw, with the surgery, and inflation, being the primary difference between the two cases.

Stephen Lidd
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Stephen Lidd
2 years 3 months ago

Wendy – You forgot to include Josh Johnson on your current season list (you did include his first TJS in 2007)

Steve
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Steve
2 years 3 months ago

He is not a young pre-arb player. He was (or likely was) in 2007. That is probably the reason he is on one list but not the other.

PlutoIsAPlanet
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PlutoIsAPlanet
2 years 3 months ago

Regardless of how much the surgery costs, the costs will be passed on to the fans of the game. So it does not cost the baseball clubs anything.

OldAxe
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OldAxe
2 years 3 months ago

No costs related to this article can be passed on to the fans. they only affects a player’s earning power.

Josh M
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Josh M
2 years 3 months ago

gotta love people who dont even bother reading the article they comment on

baycommuter
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baycommuter
2 years 3 months ago

Even if the comment was relevant to the article, it’s still wrong. Some of the costs can be passed on to fans, but not all. The percentage of any cost increase that can be passed on depends on the elasticity of demand for the product. So OPEC in the 1970s were able to pass along huge oil price increases, because there was no short-term way to reduce demand, but when Jamaica tried to do the same thing with bauxite for aluminum, it failed miseraby.

Sandy Thurdeiguez
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Sandy Thurdeiguez
2 years 3 months ago

An article showing how much a TJ impacts young pitchers would have been useful. An article that summarizes what contracts some pitchers have is garbage. Never change, Wendy Turd.

Keith H
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Keith H
2 years 3 months ago

I suppose insurance coverage can offset some of the loss. Even so, the magnitude of the losses must be staggering to some teams.

This Ranger fan took some comfort in learning that the team has insurance on Matt Harrison,who recently suffered a potentially career-ending back injury. According to an article in the Dallas Morning News, the team will recoup about $6 million of his $8 million salary this year, and a significant amount of the $13 million he will be owed annually from 2015-17.

Satoshi Nakamoto
Member
Satoshi Nakamoto
2 years 3 months ago

What is the ratio of TJ surgeries for pitchers who already inked big money contracts and pitchers making the minimum?

From this article it seems the # of TJs for pitchers pre-Big contract are more than double the pitchers with millions already guaranteed.

If the opposite was true you’d have to wonder if pitchers are intentionally injuring their elbows after they get multimillion dollar contracts guaranteed so they can relax with their new found money.

I can’t find info about how arduous the rehab process is for TJ. Yes the arm is immobile and they have to go through months of careful activities, but when they’re not at the rehab center are they just sitting in their new home living the high life?

Tony Riha
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Tony Riha
2 years 3 months ago

Satoshi, that’s an exceptionally good point. Especially when keeping in mind mind that the players usually leave the critical decisions to their support team – and that support team is significantly about “the next contract”.

Tony Riha
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Tony Riha
2 years 3 months ago

And I should add that “the next contract” is significantly about player projection. That’s why GM’s have a great job ! Not easy, but great as one of the many challenges of the position is to make those calls while your competitors, as friendly as they may be, are hoping to benefit from the GM’s mistake.

Satoshi Nakamoto
Member
Satoshi Nakamoto
2 years 3 months ago

I don’t understand the point you’re trying to make.

Old Yokel
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Old Yokel
2 years 3 months ago

Pitchers are not intentionally injuring their elbows. Pitchers having the surgery have to have multiple muscles surgically removed to be inserted into their elbow (painful). After the surgery, you permanently lose some mobility in your elbow. During rehab, you have hours of training each day for months. By having the surgery, you are giving up the fame of pitching in the MLB and you are decreasing your future earning potential. You are giving up your competitive drive which, as cliche as it sounds, is a strong motivator for the vast majority of players competing against the very best players across the globe.

There are so many downsides that it is unreasonable to think pitchers are purposely injuring their elbows. How do you think they would do this?

Satoshi Nakamoto
Member
Satoshi Nakamoto
2 years 3 months ago

Well first, like I said, I don’t know the rehab process, whether it’s easy or not. Sounds like it’s hell, in which case I agree that it’s doubtful that they’re intentionally causing a TJ surgery so they can relax at home drinking Crystal in their hottub.

How would they purposefully tear their ucl? No clue. It sounds like the rehab process is very unpleasant so there’s no need to speculate on a method of intentional ucl tearing.

Satoshi Nakamoto
Member
Satoshi Nakamoto
2 years 3 months ago

This is a nice article but I was expecting there to be some comparison and breakdown of the salaries. ‘Pitchers have a 20% decrease in salary because of the TJ surgery.’ Like that.

Victor Clements
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Victor Clements
2 years 3 months ago

What truly is remarkable is the FACT that more than a few TJ surgeries, done using the “german” method result in young men who barely hit 90 mph – comes back to bump up the velocity an incredible amount. Not unheard of to GAIN 2-4 mph on the heater when the ligament is not simply replaced in the position it was torn away from as in the old yet still used up method. These super freaks are having the new monster ligament drilled completely through the (ulnar?) all the way through, out the back side and attached with heavy hardware on the reverse side of the elbow. If you follow, this will soon be the ONLY method used. Bionic arms here we go! Them sneaky Germans. First flying saucers and now future SS recruits pumping 110 mph – not kilometers lol

Old Yokel
Guest
Old Yokel
2 years 3 months ago

What is actually remarkable is the FACT that Tommy John surgery does not increase a pitcher’s velocity.

Victor Clements
Guest
Victor Clements
2 years 3 months ago

Old Yokel,
Yes traditional TJ surgery will absolutely NOT increase a pitchers velocity. It is catastrophic. However, the secret is out about the Bosch method. This is the future , and the future is now for those who are lucky enough to play for the likes of the Mr. Turners of the baseball world.Who love these kids like their own.Thank you Mr. and Mrs. T. LOVE & TEAM. (The “other” four letter words.) Ten in a row, not too shabby :)

maqman
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maqman
2 years 3 months ago

MLB might want to write some protection from these costs in the next CBA in 2016. A couple of pitchers (John Lackey was one, can’t remember the other) have agreed to add time to their contracts, at the MLB minimum salary or $1M, if they need TJ during their contract term. If that were made standard practice teams would be more willing to agree to larger and longer contracts.
It may well be that medical advances, not involving banned substances, could be used to treat or even help prevent TJ surgery, such as blood platelet or stem cell injections.
Eliminating or reducing the pitchers mound would also reduce the mechanical stress on the UCL. It was reduced to 15 inches in 1969 when scoring was deemed too low, along with a change in the strike zone. It would be simple and effective. They should be banned in organized youth baseball, high school and college, where most of the TJ problems actually originate.

Proofread next time
Guest
Proofread next time
2 years 3 months ago

From the article:

Edinson Volquez 2009 1.059 $440,000 (pre-arb) $445,000 (pre-arb) $1,625,000 (1st year arb) $2,237,500,000 (2nd year arb)

Damn, son, I’d like over 2 billion dollars a year.

Old Yokel
Guest
Old Yokel
2 years 3 months ago

You either have a terrible sense of humor or you are a jackass who has a terrible sense of humor.

Satoshi Nakamoto
Member
Satoshi Nakamoto
2 years 3 months ago

Both?

Jim Jelak
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Jim Jelak
2 years 3 months ago

Related/unrelated. Any idea what the actual surgery cost is of TJS? I’ve always wondered.

maqman
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maqman
2 years 3 months ago

In the U.S. with insurance over $100,000 with pre and post op costs. In England with the National Health Service less than $100, which includes any prescriptions, physical therapy, etc.

Subversive
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Subversive
2 years 3 months ago

Who pays for the actual cost of TJ surgery? Player or team?

Victor Clements
Guest
Victor Clements
2 years 3 months ago

The team pays for everything, most teams pay for any serious injury connected to your playing career forever. Thank your union, and a few special owners for such a blessing. Do thank the Lord Roger Goodell is banned from all team property’s. (Unofficially official.)

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