Five Random Bullpen Tidbits

All gathered from this Baseball-Reference page.

5. Seattle relievers have collectively entered 69 games when their team held the lead. That would be individual games, not team games. Meaning, simply, the Mariners have not necessarily held the lead in 69 separate games at the point when a reliever entered. That does not seem like a ridiculous number until you look at the second lowest total in the league, which happens to be Arizona’s pen at 90 games. That’s right, the Mariners are 21 games behind the second worst team in the majors.

4. Baltimore has had 111 relief stints of multiple innings pitched. That’s the most in the league by 15. Charlie Manuel, meanwhile, has only asked a member his pen to go multiple innings at a time on 46 occasions, a league low, although Houston and Arizona (of all teams) are not too far off.

3. Jerry Manuel’s Mets lead the league in number of appearances that have come on zero days rest. This isn’t much in the way of news for Mets’ fans. Pedro Feliciano takes fewer days off than the postal service (26 times he’s worked on zero days rest). It’s happened 93 times in total for New York, 89 for Cincy, then no other team is over 80, with Tampa Bay, Colorado, Atlanta, and Houston all sitting at 75 or more.

2. The Padres’ bullpen has allowed the fewest inherited runners to score. That’s not too much of a surprise (in part because the Friars’ relievers enter with a runner on base the least of any team in the league). What is a surprise is that Cleveland’s pen ranks second. That despite a 4.53 FIP (fourth worst in baseball).

1. Last, but not least. Three members of the Pirates’ relief corp are amongst the four pitchers who enter most often when their team is down. Javier Lopez (33 down, 14 ahead/tied), D.J. Carrasco (27 down, 17 ahead/tied), and Evan Meek (26 down, 20 ahead tied) are only interrupted by Matt Albers (29 down, 12 ahead/tied). Fifth belongs to the guy I wrote about earlier, Kanekoa Texeira (26 down, 6 head/tied).



Print This Post





Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
AMH
Guest
AMH
5 years 10 months ago

Some expansions on point 4 would be interesting; the denominators of these stats are tricky, if you really want to get at a manager’s bullpen strategy.

For example, it would be useful (for NL teams) to know whether the reliever was due to hit in the next half inning, since they’ll rarely be left in.

The number of multiple inning opportunities would be good to know, too. A team with starters that regularly make it deep into games will naturally have fewer multiple inning appearances. The Phillies starters have 10 CG between them, tied for the most in the majors with the Mariners. I’d have to go through game logs to find the number of 8.X inning appearances, and 7.X inning appearances in road losses. Incidentally, this will account for some of the gap between Seattle and Arizona in point #1.

(I admit that to some extent, leaving starters in games late also speaks to a manager’s bullpen strategy and not just the starter’s quality. )

joeiq
Guest
joeiq
5 years 10 months ago

I really don’t like it when relievers, especially good ones go more than 1 IP. Obviously if the game could go into extra innings then you might.

Zumaya for example, always went 2. Cashner seems to go 2 alot. Unless you are going to need a bunch of reliever innings I’d just do 1 inning stints.

It seems to typically be the second inning where the runners score. Much more frequently than the first inning anyway.

joeiq
Guest
joeiq
5 years 10 months ago

Shortly after posting this, Cashner has a 6 run inning in his second inning of relief work.

Nate
Guest
Nate
5 years 10 months ago

Re #5.
I wonder if the 8 and 9 inning games pitched by Lee and Hernandez factor into that. Sure Seattle doesn’t spend many innings in the lead, but might they also have fewer times when Relievers enter the game because of the ‘stamina’ of those two pitchers to this point?

wilfredo
Guest
wilfredo
5 years 10 months ago

Do ‘multiple innings’ count anything more than 3 outs? Or is 2 IP (6 outs) the minimum?

Malcontent
Member
Malcontent
5 years 10 months ago

In regards to Point #5, Seattle has 47 fewer relief appearances overall; as Nate said, the CGs and deep games by Hernandez, Lee, and even Vargas have contributed to limit the number of relief appearances. In fact, the Mariners 224 relief appearances are fewest in the Majors, ahead of the Yankees with 238. Their ratio of games entered with the lead (31%) is still lower than Arizona’s (33%), but this is once again likely contributed to by the fact that they were the only team in possession of 2 of the 4 pitchers with 5 or more complete games until recently, as well as having those two pitchers consistently throwing 8 inning games when they didn’t complete them.

Rich
Guest
Rich
5 years 10 months ago

Thats interesting that the Yankees are near the bottom of total relief appearances, and near the very top of Pitching-on-0-days-rest appearances.

wpDiscuz