Hamilton or Fielder?

As Jim Breen discussed earlier, the news that the Texas Rangers have had talks with Prince Fielder raises all sorts of interesting possibilities. For 2012, a Rangers team with Fielder at first base would pose a formidable offensive threat, given that first was one of their few holes when they were batting in 2011. A Rangers batting order featuring Fielder batting behind Josh Hamilton would be frightening for opposing pitchers, indeed. This much is obvious, but such speculation raises further questions.

Hamilton himself is currently set to become a free agent after the 2012 season, after all, and has recently given a Pujols-esque condition that he will not enter negotiations for an extension once Spring Training begins. Hamilton has had a very good run with the Rangers, of course, winning the MVP with a monster season in 2010 and leading the Rangers to their first of two straight World Series appearances. It is hard to say what sort of payroll the Rangers are budgeting for given all the new cable money coming in. The team seems determined to sign Yu Darvish, too. Perhaps they could afford long-term extensions for both Fielder and Hamilton on top of Darvish. But to engage in a bit of (non-unique) speculation, if they can only afford to either sign Fielder to extend Hamilton, which should they choose?

Both Hamilton and Fielder are excellent players, but both have questions about the level of risk a team would assume with a long-term contract. Jim wrote this morning that Fielder is a legitimate five or six WAR player, and while that struck me as a bit on the high side, it is not far off. Oliver (I would also look at ZiPS, but a ZiPS projections for Hamilton is not out yet, and I prefer to use the same projection system for both players) projects Fielder, who will be 28 in May( for a context-neutral .426 wOBA (.319/.419/.578) in 2012, which is about 55 runs above average over a full season. Given Fielder’s defensive and base running limitations, he is the sort of player for whom his offensive runs above average is the same as his runs above replacement, so even accounting for a bit of attrition, five or six wins seems about right.

Oliver projects Hamilton, who will be 31 in May, for a .375 wOBA (.306/.357/.523), which would be about 30 runs above average over a full season. Unlike Fielder, Hamilton is generally thought to play above-average defense, at least when he is in left field rather than center. He also is above-average at taking the extra base. So while Fielder has a big advantage with the bat, once position, defense, and base running are taken into account, Hamilton also projects at five or more wins over a full season.

Projections, especially of total value involving stuff like fielding, are not meant to be so precise as to make hard-and-fast distinctions on the order of half of a win. So how to decide between the two, if forced? (I will not dwell on the Rangers’ positional needs — in any case, with Mitch Moreland not posing a significant obstacle and Michael Young [Young’s potential reaction to the Rangers signing Fielder might be enough to make it worth it if Young’s playing time is at all threatened] being a free agent in a couple of years, that will not be a problem for Fielder, and the Rangers are not exactly rife with outfielders, either.)

A simple way of choosing might be to say that given everything else being basically equal, the Rangers should go with the younger player in Fielder. As usual, things are not that simple. Fielder is looking for a long-term contract — Scott Boras is said to want something rivaling Albert Pujols‘ deal with Rangers’ rival in the American League West, the Angels. Let’s leave that possibility aside and simply note that Fielder is going to want at least seven years. Even on a conservative estimate of dollars-per-marginal win and the growth in that number over the life of the contract, for seven years such a market would call for a $160 million contract for Fielder assuming he is a five-to-six win player at the moment. (I realize that all reports have Fielder and Boras aiming much higher, but I would simply say that is at least in part a negotiating ploy, and also that sticking with the “Pujols number” makes this post much less interesting. Hey, I’m a selfish guy. In any case, you can plug a slightly higher number if you want, say, eight years, $180 million.)

That would take Fielder through age 35, and such calculations also take into account an average rate of decline for veteran players. As has been noted, however, similar players to Fielder often drop off more quickly than usual after 30. While I personally think that the “old player skills” theory is sometimes overdrawn in general and with respect to Prince in particular (see the relevant remarks on Fielder here), there is a danger lurking here. It is typical for most teams to take a hit in the later years of a big, long-term contract, the question is whether a team would do worse with Fielder.

Hamilton is clearly the more “athletic” player, but before he gets crowned, there is an obvious question here, too: even if Hamilton is roughly of equivalent value to Fielder over a full season, when is the last time Hamilton played a full season of around 150 games? It was 2008, when he played 156. By way of contrast, since becoming a full-timer in 2006, Fielder has never played less than 157 games, playing 162, 161, and 162 the last three seasons, respectively. During those same seasons, Hamilton has played 89, 133, and 121. It should be acknowledged that he managed his great 8.5 win season while only playing those 133 games, but while that is a great season and Hamilton is an excellent hitter, that .447 wOBA performance was far above his true talent level due to a .390 BABIP.

Moreover, it is not just that injuries cause Hamilton to miss time and thus reduce his value, but at some point (and probably already) they are likely to cause a more rapid decline in his skills than a more healthy player of the same age. To be glib: Hamilton’s trips to the disabled list are at least as much of a concern as Fielder’s trips through the buffet line. If Hamilton projects the same (5.5 wins) for a full season as Fielder, once we adjust for more realistic playing time estimate for Hamilton, he is more of a four win player than a five-to-six win player.

So given equal size and length of a contract, I would say that Fielder is the better choice. While Fielder’s thirties may not be pretty, a team can be reasonably confident (at least as far as these things go) that they would get some prime performances up from Fielder. On the other hand, Hamilton’s body already breaking down, and while Hamilton could also DH, that would take away from his defensive value, something which an all-bat player like Fielder does not have to worry about.

But what about a possibility that I will leave as more of a question than an answer: what if Hamilton is willing to sign a shorter contract than Fielder? As I have stated above, given the same length and value of the contract, I would prefer to have Fielder. While Hamilton appears to be desirous of a contract comparable to, say, Jayson Werth‘s, he and his representatives may also be aware that his injuries and age (and, of course, how the Werth’s and Carl Crawford‘s contracts have played out in their first season) may scare some teams off (and that is without getting into the even-more-difficult-to-estimate risk stemming from Hamilton’s addiction issues) from that sort of large commitment.

Simply for the sake of argument: if Hamilton were willing to, say, replace this season of his contract with a five-year, $110 million contract, would that be a better commitment from the Ranger’s perspective than a longer deal with Fielder? I can see both sides of it — on one hand, the smaller commitment in general makes it a bit easier to exhale. On the other, Hamilton’s more advanced age and injury issues are already present, even the smaller deal is still paying him like a five-win player, and as noted above, that might be a bit much to expect given how many games his typically plays in a season.

All of this leaves aside the quite viable possibility that none of the contracts discussed above for Hamilton and Fielder are good ideas for the Rangers. But that would be boring.

There is absolutely no better way to resolve such a dilemma than an on-line poll, right?




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Matt Klaassen reads and writes obituaries in the Greater Toronto Area. If you can't get enough of him, follow him on Twitter.


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Eminor3rd
Member
Eminor3rd
4 years 7 months ago

I choose Price Fielder

K N
Guest
K N
4 years 7 months ago

same, Prince is such a better bet than Josh. It’s not even close in my mind

corvelay
Guest
corvelay
4 years 7 months ago

When you are looking at making a $100+ million commitment to a player you certainly can’t forget that he spent 4 years on a drug and booze bender I’m not a medical expert but I would imagine there still might be negative repercussions from the stress he put on his body during those years – it may take him longer to recover from injuries, his liver or kidneys or other organs may not be in great shape or his body might be ‘older’ than his actual age, and latent medical issues may manifest themselves in the future, etc. He appears to be on the right path now, but the threat of a relapse is always lurking. So I think a team would have to get a further discount from what they would give a typical 31-year old with his playing and injury history to make it a worthwhile risk.

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

As one of about 7 Reds fans who isn’t upset about trading Josh Hamilton, I will say now what I said when the Reds did trade him…. don’t trust a drug addict. Let’s be upfront about this…. The Reds and Rangers have both hired and paid for, what is essentially a babysitter for Josh Hamilton because they don’t trust him to not have one. The guy is a GREAT baseball player when he is healthy. But I wouldn’t hand him any kind of contract with anything near those terms. His own wife won’t even let him carry two $20 bills in his pocket.

Prince Fielder doesn’t have a good body type for aging. But I would gladly put my eggs in the basket that he can still mash for the next 7 years over handing out a contract to a player with the warts that Josh Hamilton has on his resume.

Uncle Randy
Guest
Uncle Randy
4 years 7 months ago

Is that thing about his wife true/where can I read that? If so, that is really fascinating.

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/albert_chen/05/27/hamilton0602/

“He rarely carries more than $10 in his wallet, and never more than $20.”

That story doesn’t talk about his wife there, but while he was with the Reds, I read that somewhere (though can’t find it via google).

DavidCEisen
Guest
DavidCEisen
4 years 7 months ago

So you made it up or imagined it basically.

I’m sure you have some sort of qualification to justify your sweeping generalizations.

chuckb
Member
chuckb
4 years 7 months ago

@ Doug —

That allegation about his wife is outlandish. For you to take a comment about him not carrying much cash in his wallet and take the great leap to state, emphatically, that his wife won’t allow it and use that bit of conjecture to imply that it’s because even she doesn’t trust his sobriety is borderline slanderous.

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

Didn’t make it up. Just because it isn’t easily available to find online doesn’t mean it isn’t true. The Cincinnati Enquirer makes you pay for stuff older than a year, so you won’t find it there unless you subscribe and use their archaic search engine, which is downright terrible. So, if the only newspaper in Cincinnati is where the article I read was at, then I am not going to be able to find it.

DavidCEisen
Guest
DavidCEisen
4 years 7 months ago

“I didn’t make it up, there is just no empirical evidence that what I said is true.”

B N
Guest
B N
4 years 7 months ago

For what its’ worth, the articles I’ve seen indicate that this is a self-imposed restriction of holding less than $20. And his per-diem is managed by one of the coaches, so he doesn’t get more than that.

With that said, I don’t see why people are up-at-arms over Doug’s claim that he read an article at some point that said his wife had something to do with that rule. Haven’t you ever had a fight with your wife, then made a rule together to avoid it in the future? I’d imagine over years of drug abuse, they’ve had more than their share of fights… just saying. There’s only so many times you want to send your significant other out for a gallon of milk, only to find them sometime next week strung out on someone’s couch.

With that said, so long as he keeps to his rules and has his system in place, I don’t see any reason why he should relapse. Plenty of people kick the habit for good. It’s not like they’re cured, but they keep things structured so they don’t use and maybe someday they don’t feel the urge as much anymore.

bcp33bosox
Guest
bcp33bosox
4 years 7 months ago

Am I the only one on here who likes drugs?

I Agree Guy
Guest
I Agree Guy
4 years 7 months ago

Those are some sour ass grapes you’ve been eating.

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

Sour grapes?

Why would I have sour grapes about it?

jim
Guest
jim
4 years 7 months ago

2010 AL MVP? 2 straight AL pennants?

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

Why would I be bothered by what Hamilton did for the Rangers?

jim
Guest
jim
4 years 7 months ago

because he didn’t do it for the reds….

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

He didn’t do it against the Reds either, so it doesn’t bother me one bit. It would be one thing if he did it for the Cardinals, but for a team they don’t play in another league? Maybe you would be bothered by that. I am not.

MikeS
Guest
MikeS
4 years 7 months ago

I agree. He has been clean enough to stay on the baseball field (when healthy) but if that turns bad then you could be looking at a monumentally bad contract to be carrying. This is a substantial risk that is probably even harder to quantify than injury.

dannyrangers32
Member
dannyrangers32
4 years 7 months ago

hey doug you might want to rethink that. for your information that article was written in 2008, just 2 years after he became sober. now its 2012. hes still addict and thats always a risk but its amazing how much more successful faith-based recoveries are than others. i would consider it a risk but to talk about his wife not letting him carry a $20 bill in 2008 and labeling him a huge risk because of addiction is outrageous.

Josh H
Guest
Josh H
4 years 7 months ago

Is it amazing? Or is it marginal?

Terry Boers
Guest
Terry Boers
4 years 7 months ago

I don’t give an addict a long term deal. He’s done great, but you can’t trust him

MikeN
Guest
MikeN
4 years 7 months ago

Don’t know if you’ve ever heard of Darryl Strawberry or Lawrence Taylor, Michael Irvin? Probably haven’t heard of those guys. They abused while in their prime. Hamilton has his deal much more under control.

Charlie Furbush
Guest
Charlie Furbush
4 years 7 months ago

Ever hear of Dwight Gooden, Ricky Williams, or John Daly?

Past instances of substance abuse are a legitimate concern when you’re considering paying someone $100 million.

CircleChange11
Guest
CircleChange11
4 years 7 months ago

Dwight Gooden checked into rehab. His career was ruined by an arm injury.

So, we know of a few guys whose careers have ended possibly due to drugs.

Now, what % of the pool of drug using athletes are they?

There have been athletes that have committed murder. There have been athletes that have been killed in car accidents (some drunk, some not) … there have been strange ends to careers in a variety of ways. Drug addiction IMO hasn’t shown itself to be vastly more detrimental to the chance of a player’s career ending than driving, drinking, etc.

The username was Terry Boers, so my assumption is that it’s a joke/troll. He’s a radio piece on 670 the Score. Unfortunately, I know that.

Colin
Guest
Colin
4 years 7 months ago

I would say it has more to do with not giving a 30 year old who has missed 140 games in 3 years a 5 year deal than it has to do with him being a former drug addict.

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

There is no such thing as a former drug addict.

Baltar
Guest
Baltar
4 years 7 months ago

There is no such thing as a fact backing the opinions of Doug Gray.

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

Clever. But that simply isn’t correct at all. I would expect someone who reads fangraphs to be smarter than to suggest something like that based off of one statement, that hasn’t been disproven at all. Yes, it hasn’t been proven either.

Nate
Guest
Nate
4 years 7 months ago

Fielder seems like the risk adverse choice/more likely to perform up to a $100+ million contract. Hamilton’s injury issues may force him to 1b or DH, and if you take out the defense aspect of the 2 players, Fielder hitting skill is better. You never know though, Hamilton could be another Paul Molitor, another athletic player who had his own drug/injury issues.

Aggie E
Guest
Aggie E
4 years 7 months ago

Ranger fan here. its correct that Josh is not allowed to carry cash. He was a heroin addict and once a heroin addict your always a heroin addict. Also meth, crack whatever crap he was doing. I like Josh but he has already talked about his “responsibility” to sign a market level deal. While I have no problem with that I think his baseline for a deal will be at least what Werth recieved which texas would be smart to not consider and i think if Fielder hit in Texas his numbers at least for 3-4 years would balloon to something like .300/375/600 and as shown he plays every day. Easy choice IMO…

jim
Guest
jim
4 years 7 months ago

gonna be tough for a guy with a .390 career OBP and over .400 3 years in a row to balloon it to .375

dannyrangers32
Member
dannyrangers32
4 years 7 months ago

aggie, he never even tried heroin, let along addicted to it. he even specifically says that in his book that it is completely incorrect what the media says about him being a heroin addict. meth either. completely cocaine and crack.

Baltar
Guest
Baltar
4 years 7 months ago

“Former addict” strikes me as the correct term to describe someone who used to use drugs but hasn’t for many years, not “addict.”
AA mumbo-jumbo runs deep.

ToddM
Guest
ToddM
4 years 7 months ago

Hamilton’s going to be a really interesting case. There aren’t many other superstar-level players that have overcome serious drug issues (as in, forced him out of the game temporarily) and returned with ferocity of Josh.

I think he’s going to aim high and miss on his contract. He just doesn’t have comparables. I think his best offer is going to be from the Rangers, given their knowledge of his situation, and if he decides not to take it, he’s going to get mostly short-term deals (say 3/60) from other clubs.

ToddM
Guest
ToddM
4 years 7 months ago

Either that or some serious contractual language that voids everything in drug-related situations. I guess that could work if it’s legal.

Doug Gray
Guest
4 years 7 months ago

I imagine it would be doable, because if he fails a drug test, he is out of baseball for good I believe, as it would be his third strike.

dannyrangers32
Member
dannyrangers32
4 years 7 months ago

@doug: fifth

Aggie E
Guest
Aggie E
4 years 7 months ago

Nope. He is a fan draw and will get paid at least a 5-6 year deal from some owner. Only takes one. We see what Werth and Crawford recieved. A former MVP and big draw will get paid especially if he has a monster season in 2012…

ToddM
Guest
ToddM
4 years 7 months ago

We’ll see. Werth and Crawford don’t have drug issues. That was my point. Hamilton can’t pack ’em in if he isn’t on the field, and owners know that.

CircleChange11
Guest
CircleChange11
4 years 7 months ago

Did everyone miss the 80s when cocaine was a MAJOR problem in baseball?

Some pretty good players were using drugs regularly, and I can think of one team in particular that was famous for partying hard on their way to a WS victory. 2 of their key players ended up having major drug problems.

IMO, Josh’s durability is a greater issue than his drug use (or addiction). He’s like the MLB’s version of Ben Roethlisberger, he’s always battling some ailing or nagging injury.

ToddM
Guest
ToddM
4 years 7 months ago

There’s a big freaking difference between a recreational coke habit (which is what most MLB users had, although some were more serious) and what happened to a young Josh Hamilton.

Dude drugged himself completely out of the minor leagues for a few years. He was basically living under a bridge. Read his story. Crazy stuff to come all the way back from that to win a MLB MVP.

CircleChange11
Guest
CircleChange11
4 years 7 months ago

I was thinking more of guys like Tim Raines, Lonnie Smith, etc.

Raines was smiffing coke out of his wristband and diving headfirst so he wouldn’t smash vials he kept in his back pocket, if reports are correct.

IMO, the 80s in sports featured far more than just recreational coke use.

However, your point is made, rarely did any stars use themselves completely out of baseball.

I was disagreeing with the idea that they would refuse to give him a contract because of the fear that he might relapse into a drug frenzy that would propel him downward and out of baseball … again.

I think they would have many “in between” steps in that process. He may have a relapse where he uses drugs or even goes a day or two spree. But, that could all be contained within the contract, just like some contracts eliminate the possibility of riding motorcycles and/or playing pick-up basketball.

TexPantego
Guest
TexPantego
4 years 7 months ago

I’m a Ranger fan, but even if healthy, I’m not keen on long term deals to players over 30, and Josh’s helath history is terrible, so the odds that his production decline is steep are very good. No thank you. A 2 year deal with some team options, yes, but that’s as far as I can imagine. If somebody wants to give Josh a Werth-like deal, adios Josh.

I’m pro-Fielder, but 6 years tops, preferably 4 or 5. It lessens the loss of Josh and probably Napoli and Nelly Cruz, plus it keeps Michael Young off the field more. The only big negative is it means less ABS for Napoli this year.

Aggie E
Guest
Aggie E
4 years 7 months ago

Napoli had about 450 ABs last year and thats probably where he needs to be. he could catch about 85-90 games and DH 40-45 games and play 1st base 3-5 games and still get 450-500 ABs…

Franklin Stubbs
Guest
Franklin Stubbs
4 years 7 months ago

What’s the point of playing him 3-5 games at first and risk injury because he’d be at a position he doesn’t play much?

ben
Guest
ben
4 years 7 months ago

I get that people think he’s a risk because of his drug addictions, but if the Rangers don’t sign him long term I wouldn’t be surprised if he did much better than 5/110. Have you seen the free agent market for hitters next season? Yuck.

Franklin Stubbs
Guest
Franklin Stubbs
4 years 7 months ago

Just because somebody else would do it, it doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. Can you name a $100mm contract to a player over 30 that’s turned out to be a good idea? Let him walk.

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

Not offhand, but if he helps you win a WS, it’s worth it. Same with Pujols.

jim
Guest
jim
4 years 7 months ago

that depends on your definition of “good idea”

ben
Guest
ben
4 years 7 months ago

Actually, my point was not that the Rangers should extend him. My point was that Hamilton shouldn’t take that extension (that is, if money is his main priority).

Baltar
Guest
Baltar
4 years 7 months ago

Brian, at least 25 players help any given team to win a World Series. At $100M+, that would require quite a payroll.

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

Prince. Longer track record. Better hitter. Might eat himself to death, but whatever. Legitimate playoff team, give Prince whatever it takes to sign him and go for it.

MEAT227
Guest
MEAT227
4 years 7 months ago

Yes, he will eat himself to death with his vegan menu. Man, that’s a lot of roughage and tofu.

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

Didn’t that only last like half a season?

Franklin Stubbs
Guest
Franklin Stubbs
4 years 7 months ago

Prince is a big guy, but he’s not a fat guy. Give him some credit for the work he’s put in.

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

Just jokin around. Prince is awesome.

Don Mynack
Guest
Don Mynack
4 years 7 months ago

Quit beating around the bush – the relevant question here is can Prince Fielder eat Josh Hamilton, and if so, would we notice? I think the answer is yes and you betcha.

Baltar
Guest
Baltar
4 years 7 months ago

Is Josh Hamilton a vegetable?

cpebbles
Guest
cpebbles
4 years 7 months ago

“Given Fielder’s defensive and base running limitations, he is the sort of player for whom his offensive runs above average is the same as his runs above replacement, so even accounting for a bit of attrition, five or six wins seems about right.”

I suppose that’s true if he got a hell of a lot better at running and fielding since we last saw him. What has gotten into everyone’s heads this offseason? Fielder is a good player with an enormous red flag. His contract is going to be an absolute disaster.

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

If you’re already a WS contender, it’s worth it

Aggie E
Guest
Aggie E
4 years 7 months ago

Not sure why. there are plenty unathletic 1st basemen getting paid crazy money.

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

But not that can be had for team x.

And I’ll take an unathletic 5 WAR player over your very athletic 2 WAR player.

jim
Guest
jim
4 years 7 months ago

definitely take fielder, especially when you look at several good OFs set to hit the market next year

Oliver
Guest
Oliver
4 years 7 months ago

Fielder, and it’s not even close. Younger, healthy, hell of a bat, and I think the discussion of his weight is overblown. He’s a big guy, but he’s not a slug, and he always shows up ready to play baseball. I think the case for Fielder is solid without even worrying about Hamilton’s past drug use.
I think the Rangers should sign Fielder, if only because they’re probably going to get a bargain they wouldn’t get in any other year.

jim
Guest
jim
4 years 7 months ago

“I think the discussion of his weight is overblown.”

this is the key; people have said the same things about sabathia’s weight for years, and look at him, keeps on trucking, at the far more difficult job as well

Oliver
Guest
Oliver
4 years 7 months ago

I think the better question is (ignoring need for a sec), “Darvish or Fielder?”

Wait Til Next Year
Guest
Wait Til Next Year
4 years 7 months ago

Why not Darvish AND Fielder???

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

Greed is not good.

pft
Guest
pft
4 years 7 months ago

Hamilton is too brittle physically and emotionally. The odds of him being injured or off the wagon Y2Y are high. Fielder is no Prince either with his weight, especially in the latter years of a deal.

Brian
Guest
Brian
4 years 7 months ago

There is no planet on which Figgins is a better player than Prince based on their numbers.

Los
Guest
Los
4 years 7 months ago

Feed the troll much?

jim
Guest
jim
4 years 7 months ago

you’re new around here, aren’t you brian?

Phantom Stranger
Guest
Phantom Stranger
4 years 7 months ago

From a pure business standpoint Hamilton is a much more attractive option as a gate attraction. He is regularly one of the highest vote-getters at the All-Star game on a national basis and is beloved in Texas.

Antonio Bananas
Guest
Antonio Bananas
4 years 7 months ago

Hamilton is older. Not only is he older, but he has a history of injuries. Not only does he have a history of injuries, but he also has a drug and alcohol history, which I’m sure has long lasting affects. Not only all that, but he sort of killed someone. This shouldn’t even be close. Fat friendly Fielder fiercly fighting fastballs any day of the week.

ericpalmer
Member
ericpalmer
4 years 7 months ago

He sorta killed someone? Is that a joke? He threw the guy a ball…

Pete Rose HOF 2012
Guest
Pete Rose HOF 2012
4 years 7 months ago

He kind of killed someone?? You are an absolute idiot. The guy didn’t have to reach for the ball over the railing. IT was just a $1 baseball. He assumed all risk when he went for that ball. It’s like calling an owner of a sky diving place a murderer because someone died when jumping out of a plane. Get a brain u idiot. To call Josh Hamilton a murderer when he lives with so much guilt every single day is just ignorant.

dannyrangers32
Member
dannyrangers32
4 years 7 months ago

WOW. you really really absolutely blame josh for that??? do you know how many players throw balls to fans? hamilton doesnt even do it too often. i dont think im even gonna argue with you this is just ridiculous

Antonio Bananas
Guest
Antonio Bananas
4 years 7 months ago

it was a joke, settle down. It’s my morbid sense of humor. You guys are so serious, I tried really hard to show that I wasn’t serious in the post. Next time I’ll put (joking) after.

Colin
Guest
Colin
4 years 7 months ago

OMG OMG AHHH, he said Josh Hamilton killed a guy….with a trident….let us shun him.

Pete Rose HOF 2012
Guest
Pete Rose HOF 2012
4 years 7 months ago

Awesome awesome article. Really tough choice tho. I think Fielder gets the edge with durability but if Hamilton could just stay healthy, it wouldn’t even be close. I think the Hamilton deal has a greater chance of being a good deal for the Rangers but it could also turn out to be an absolutely horrible deal. The Fielder deal will be bad for the Rangers but it doesn’t have as much potential for reward or risk. Depends if the Rangers are feeling lucky or if they want to play it safe. I say sign both and go all in. It’s a big market and they need to spend a little more.

ToddM
Guest
ToddM
4 years 7 months ago

Problem is, there will come a day when the Rangers’ rotation isn’t dirt cheap.

dannyrangers32
Member
dannyrangers32
4 years 7 months ago

HAHAHAHAHAHAAAHAAA. sorry i cant help but laugh. sorry. but really. wow.

Slartibartfast
Guest
Slartibartfast
4 years 7 months ago

Flamilielderton.

Jim Detry
Guest
Jim Detry
4 years 7 months ago

Unless I missed it, no one has pointed out the obvious solution to Hamilton, which is a contract loaded with playing time incentives. If he’s healthy he gets the money, and will be worth it. If he’s not healthy he doesn’t get the money. I also suspect that, if a player is unable to perform because of drug related problems, there is some clause in the standard contract that lets him be suspended without pay.

Antonio Bananas
Guest
Antonio Bananas
4 years 7 months ago

You think Hamilton will take that contract? What if another team offers him a guaranteed contract? He knows his injury problems too.

B N
Guest
B N
4 years 7 months ago

I’d never take Figgins, since it’s clear from the last two years he suffers some sort of infield-batted-ball addiction. Maybe if he seeks help and shows he can stay off the weak-contact for a year or two, but for right now I wouldn’t touch him. :)

James Gentile
Member
4 years 7 months ago

Today is not a day that I am proud of the comments at Fangraphs.

Feeding the Abscess
Guest
Feeding the Abscess
4 years 4 months ago

Love that Hamilton has an addiction and shouldn’t be given a long-term deal, but the guy who weighs in at about 300 pounds and has been morbidly obese for nearly his entire life somehow doesn’t have an addiction and is a safer signing.

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