More Than Devil Magic Pushing the Cardinals to Victory

In the brief interludes between arguing whether the Cardinals do indeed have “the best fans in baseball” and if they should or should not be offended by Yasiel Puig, a popular discussion topic on social media has centered on St. Louis’ so-called “Cardinals Devil Magic,” i.e., the sense that everything always seems to go the Cardinals’ way in October.

Setting aside the obvious fact that it didn’t help them out much last year when they frittered away a 3-1 NLCS lead to San Francisco, you can understand why, really. The Cardinals are in their ninth NLCS since 1996 and are just a single game away from their fourth World Series in ten seasons, but they’re not really outplaying the Dodgers. Los Angeles has outhit the Cardinals in each of the four games of the series, and held them to just a .134/.190/.175 line through three games; cumulatively, the Cardinals have outscored the Dodgers by just a single run, 8-7. But it’s the Cardinals who are up three games to one, and the Dodgers who find themselves in a desperate position in Wednesday’s Game 5.

The Cardinals are on the verge of winning this series because they’re deeper, they’re healthier, and they’re making fewer mistakes. Sure, they’ve had a few balls bounce their way, but as we saw in Game 3, the Dodgers have had their share as well (thanks in large part to Jon Jay). This has been an incredibly close series fought by two evenly-matched teams, and it’s not hard at all to see a scenario where the NLCS might otherwise be tied or even tilted in the favor of Los Angeles.

Just look at all the little things from each victory that add up to a series lead:

Game 1: Andre Ethier fails to come down with an admittedly tough ball at the wall in center that allows the tying runs to score. Joe Kelly hits Hanley Ramirez in the ribs, causing a fracture, and while few think it was intentional, Ramirez missed Game 2 and came out early in Game 4 after striking out three times. Don Mattingly inexplicably lifts Adrian Gonzalez in the eighth inning, then refuses to use Kenley Jansen until it was too late. Michael Young had only two plate appearances, yet still had the sixth-worst WPA playoff game ever. Carlos Beltran nails Mark Ellis with a perfect throw to the plate in the tenth inning, denying a possible go-ahead run.

Game 2: Rookie Michael Wacha matches future Hall of Famer Clayton Kershaw. A.J. Ellis‘ passed ball plays a big part in the only run of the game scoring, but so does Carl Crawford not being able to come anywhere near the plate with his throw on the sacrifice fly. Wacha and four relievers combine to strike out Puig all four times he’s up, while neither Ethier nor Ramirez start.

Game 4: Light-hitting outfielder Shane Robinson (!) hits a pinch-hit homer, his first hit in 12 career postseason plate appearances. Veteran Nick Punto makes a rookie mistake for the Dodgers, getting picked off second just after doubling in the seventh. Carlos Martinez, who had a 5.08 ERA in the regular season, pumps in 13 of his pitches at 97 or higher while easily getting through two innings of relief. David Freese leaves with an injury, just in time for Daniel Descalso to slide to third and the defensively-superior Pete Kozma to turn this double play…

kozma_carpenter_dp_nlcs_game4

…one of three the Cardinals turned on the night, including getting Puig to kill a possible rally in the ninth after Ethier reached. In the four games, St. Louis has seven double plays.

Cardinals magic is being able to replace your closer 97% of the way through the season with a far-more-dominant one in Trevor Rosenthal. It’s losing Allen Craig and having Matt Adams available to step right in. It’s the ability to take one of the 30 or so best starters in the league, Shelby Miller, simply bury him due to perceived fatigue, and not suffer much of a drop-off at all. It’s keeping Puig at bay, bat-flip triples aside, and completely disarming Juan Uribe, who had hurt the Braves so much in the NLDS.

It’s having a guy like Kelly who succeeds despite all evidence saying that he shouldn’t;  it’s having being able to add guys like Wacha mid-season. It’s being fortunate enough to face a team that has a hobbled Ramirez and Ethier and no Matt Kemp at all, though it’s fair to remember that the Cardinals are without Craig and Jason Motte and Chris Carpenter and Jaime Garcia themselves.

The Cardinals aren’t perfect, of course, because we’ve seen them make mistakes too. (Other than Jay, I’m looking at Descalso getting doubled off second by Crawford.) But unlike the Dodgers, they’ve largely contained them to one game, and their endless supply of pitching talent has more than made up for any mistakes their manager might have made and the lack of damage their own offense has done against good Dodger pitching.

It’s not magic, and it’s not whatever the “Midwestern good guys against rich Hollywood types” narrative has been floating around. It’s simply a good, deep team that’s done just tiny bit more than another good, deep team, and it’s got them on the verge of going to the World Series.




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Mike Petriello lives in New York and writes about the Dodgers daily at Dodgers Digest, as well as contributing to ESPN Insider. He wrote two chapters in the 2014 Hardball Times Annual as well as building The Hardball Times site, and was an editorial producer at Sports on Earth. Find him at @mike_petriello.


72 Responses to “More Than Devil Magic Pushing the Cardinals to Victory”

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  1. abjohnson16 says:

    To be fair I believe they announced the Freese sub was a defensive substitution in Game 4 which Matheny has done this season with late leads. Game 3 he was pulled with an injury.

    Obviously still flukey in that it didn’t happen the inning before while Descalso is at SS. But it feels nice to be able to point out when Matheny pushes the correct buttons occasionally.

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  2. Krog says:

    The real secret of the Cardinals is the pack of magic beans they bought that grows ballplayers. The player development system in St. Louis is astoundingly good.

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    • Antonio Bananas says:

      How much does that stay sustained with Lunhow gone? We see how ridiculous the Astros farm is getting already.

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  3. stan says:

    Does anyone actually believe that Ethier had a real chance to catch that ball in Game 1? If he had it would have been one of the greatest catches in LCS history. Carlos Gomez would have had a shot at it but if you’re marking that as a catchable ball then I’d say you’re looking for excuses.
    Its not like the Dodgers haven’t had their share of luck too. It seems like half their hits have come on broken bats or bloopers that fall just out of reach of the infielders.
    And, if you’re marking down any of Wacha or Martinez’ success as luck, then you haven’t done your homework on those two players. They, along with Kelly, have tons of ability and have earned Matheny’s confidence. Kelly was probably the best Cardinal starter in the second half of the year.

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    • Mike Petriello says:

      Well, he got there and it him in the glove. As I noted, it would have been a difficult play. Also, I didn’t say that the STL relievers were “luck”.

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    • CFIC says:

      Kelly the best Cardinals starter in the 2nd half? bwahahaha wut

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      • stan says:

        Someday people are going to realize that FIP and xFIP rely to a ridiculous degree on strikeouts and ignore the accomplishments of pitchers who can allow baserunners who can keep the ball in the park. I laugh at the insistence to the contrary just like I used to laugh at people who focused on BA and RBI’s. Anyone who has watched the Cardinals this year could tell you that Kelly has been tremendous down the stretch. There was no question at all among the “best fans in baseball” or the local media that he would be in the playoff rotation and get two turns. Only the national media who hadn’t actually watched the games was debating whether Miller or Lynn were in the mix and where.

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        • NS says:

          “FIP and xFIP rely to a ridiculous degree on strikeouts”

          What is the correct degree on which to “rely” on strikeouts when calculating FIP (or something like it)? Show us your work.

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        • stan says:

          What percentage of this formula is really strikeouts, or more specifically K/BB ratio?

          FIP = ((13*HR)+(3*(BB+HBP))-(2*K))/IP + constant

          Basically all of it right?

          Given that the home run and HBP rate is only going to affect a few pitchers, FIP is really nothing but BB/K at a 3/2 ratio at a scale that approximates classic ERA.

          You might as well just compare BB/K ratios. Not only that, but FIP cannot be applied to guys, like Kelly, that attempt to gain outs via the groundball. That’s a very significant portion of MLB pitchers over time. There are fewer at the moment since the strikeout is in vogue, but at one time junkballing groundball specialists were plentiful. Now, however, these guys are dismissed as “lucky” even in cases where they have thrown more than enough innings to prove that there is no luck involved.

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        • NS says:

          Ok. What is the correct degree on which to “rely” on strikeouts when calculating FIP (or something like it)? Show us your work.

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      • Jason B says:

        Yeah…yeah, what CFIC said.

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    • mcurryatl says:

      Considering Either has a bum ankle and still got there, I would say that most CF with average to above average range get to ball, and a decent number make the catch. Still very tough play though. Jon Jay? Does not make catch. As a cards fan if it had been caught I don’t think it goes down as one of the greatest LCS catches ever, more like the story would have been “Grienke pitches gem, Cards rally snuffed out by great catch.”

      Incidentally, it would be awesome if Fangraphs had landing page with top ten playoff/world series defensive plays by perceived difficult combined with WPA. I will always remember the Endy Chavez catch. Still most spectacular high pressure catch I have seen in playoffs. Could also have hits/homeruns/baserunning events. Limit to ones where video is available? Then I could be even more productive at work. God I love the playoffs.

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      • chuckb says:

        Any Cards’ fan also remembers the catch Edmonds made in game 7 of the 2004 NLCS to rob Brad Ausmus of a sure run-scoring double that would have increased their lead to 3 or 4 runs. Instead, no more runs scored and the Cards came back off of Clemens to win the NLCS.

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    • chuckb says:

      Though Wacha and Martinez are very talented, the Cardinals are extremely fortunate to be able to plug those guys in and have them pitch the way they have with as little major league experience as they have.

      I’m a Cardinals fan but if you think that there’s not some good fortune to go along with their immense talent in their success, you’re dreaming.

      Also, perhaps you’ve heard of a guy by the name of Adam Wainwright. If not, I’d like to introduce you to his player page:

      http://www.fangraphs.com/statss.aspx?playerid=2233&position=P

      Finally, untether yourself from ERA.

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      • stan says:

        If you don’t think ERA and FIP are at least equal in terms of analytic value, you’re throwing out the old just for the sake of adopting the new. Kelly doesn’t allow runs. That’s all that matters. Just because he doesn’t do it in a way that fits FIP doesn’t mean he’s not good. Yes, Kelly pitched better than Waino in the second half. Wainwright himself would tell you the same.

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        • chuckb says:

          If Wainwright said that, he would be acting deferential toward Kelly or just being humble. Stating that Kelly was better than Wainwright for anything more than a game or 2 this season or ever is just patently untrue.

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        • Jason B says:

          “Kelly doesn’t allow runs. That’s all that matters.”

          There’s lots for you to explore here! Welcome.

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        • stan says:

          I’ve been here for years. Practically since the start. Like I said, I was among those railing against the value of certain old stats from my early teens. However, unlike you sheep, I also have recognized that there are two huge flaws in the new stats: FIP relies to a ridiculous degree on strikeouts and WAR is too dependent on playing time. I have also rejected the notion that the old stats are useless merely because they are old.

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        • RC says:

          FIP is actually only more predictive than ERA in a certain subset of parks. its really a poor stat.

          It also thinks that a hit is a better outcome than a fielded out (doesn’t increase IP).. which is absurd.

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        • NS says:

          “I have also rejected the notion that the old stats are useless merely because they are old.”

          My, what an insight. Nevermind that no one has ever taken this position, you tell ‘em!

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        • stan says:

          @NS. Perhaps I’m underrating the herd here. I was assuming that, like the one poster who came out and said it, everyone else was assuming that Kelly is bad because his FIP is bad and that his ERA didn’t matter. Perhaps you’d care to enlighten me on why else everyone on here is down on him. Maybe its the fact that his K/BB ratio is bad…

          … except that’s also the reason his FIP is bad.

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        • Bip says:

          “WAR is too dependent on playing time.”

          lol. A counting stat is dependent on playing time! Preposterous.

          “FIP relies to a ridiculous degree on strikeouts”

          Do you at least understand the idea of FIP? Your posts suggest you don’t. If you did you would understand this well-established principle of DIPS theory: Overwhelming likelihood says either Kelly will improve his K/BB numbers, or his ERA will jump up to the neighborhood of his FIP going forward.

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        • RJ3 says:

          Actually, I agree with you on the comparison of analytical values of ERA, WAR, and FIP. The problems with ERA are well established. FIP is strictly limited to the assumption that strikeout pitchers are harder to hit and HR’s are bad and that’s all pitchers can control. However, it still has value. I believe that SIERA has more value than both. It accounts for extreme groundball pitchers and extreme flyball pitchers. Groundballs mean more hits, unless they are pounded into the ground and flyballs mean more homers, unless they are popped nearly straight up into the air.

          To consider FIP the end all be all or any stat for that matter is a mistake. Each of these metrics only paints part of a picture. I snicker when someone points out a pitcher has a 51% ground ball percentage. So? That’s not extreme enough to matter.

          As for WAR, check out WAR/9 I think it is which is like taking the overall number of strikeouts (a counting stat) and turning it into K/9.

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      • NS says:

        I on the other hand have never rooted for the Cardinals, but to expand on your first point…

        There’s a tremendous amount of good fortune in virtually every success story across any industry, sports or otherwise. So the question is not “were they lucky” (yes), but “were they *just* lucky”? The answer is absolutely not. The Cardinals are a model franchise and have again put themselves in position where a bit of good fortune could make them champions.

        That itself is a measure of skill: how far would a bit of good fortune take you?

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        • Bip says:

          People can have playoffs, they can have a system that neutralizes luck and rewards skill, but they can’t have both. If we want playoffs, then we have to face the consequences.

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    • Jay says:

      The ball was also about a foot from being a home run. If it gets out the game never goes to extras.

      I agree that the Dodgers have been getting their fair share of luck too. Last night Puig’s RBI single was on a ball that absolutely has to be fielded. Kozma might have turned that into a DP, but any decent shortstop at the very least gets one out and prevents the run from scoring. At least 4 of the Dodgers hits in game 3 were either bloops or fly balls that should have been easy catches. Does it really take “devil magic” for the Cardinals to win 3/4 from a team they won 5 more games than (in a tougher division) during the regular season?

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      • Jim says:

        And if the ump gets the call right at home, the Dodgers probably win in 10. Just sayin’

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        • Jay says:

          Anyone with internet access has surely seen the blown up frames proving Ellis was out so I’m assuming this is just trolling.

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        • stan says:

          Unfortunately, it seems like that is the accepted story around the internet these days among apologists. Personally, I thought it was too close to call even with the blow-up but that the throw beat him by so much that it shouldn’t be a controversy.

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        • Jim says:

          Sorry, no trolling here. I haven’t seen any blow ups that show Molina made the tag. In the ones I’ve seen look like he missed (ftwUSAtoday) and I don’t agree with the argument that the ball beating him means he should be called out. To me, that’s too much like the ‘human element’ excuse for not having implemented better instant replay already.

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        • Anon says:

          The runner is out if he initiates contact with a defender who has the ball with the purpose of dislodging the ball. This isn’t enforced on plays at the plate, but the rule does apply there.

          I don’t know how anyone can think a runner is safe who demolishes a catcher who got the ball well ahead of the contact.

          As commonly enforced, the runner is out if the catcher doesn’t drop the ball. By rulebook, the runner is out by interference.

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      • Bip says:

        Wasn’t the idea of this post that there isn’t any devil magic, just the Cardinals winning games?

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  4. Bip says:

    Why is this post now, rather than after the cardinals actually go to the WS?

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  5. CFIC says:

    having said all that, the Cardinals are not as deep as one might think after losing Craig. Adams plays much better as a bench bat, especially vs the Dodgers’ lefties. The Dodgers bench is actually, arguably, far better. The main difference we are seeing is the Cards’ absolutely superior bullpen to the Dodgers lackluster one.

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    • stan says:

      For all their success, the front office has actually had one of the worst years in MLB. They gave an extension to Motte for no reason only to have him blow out his arm. Their only FA signings were both being paid by the Cardinals NOT to play for them (Wigginton and Cedeno). While other teams were adding to their rosters in July and August, the Cardinals only added Axford despite them having money to spend and prospects to trade. That’s what has led to a playoff roster with only Robinson, Descalso/ Kozma, Chambers and Wong on the bench. If they win one more game and Craig can’t come back, the WS is going to be a real problem for them during DH games.

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      • stan says:

        I should add that their talent acquisition was as good as it has been this year and last. Alexander Reyes, Marco Gonzales and Rob Kaminsky all look really good right now. However, they seem to love these prospects so much that they can’t bear to trade any good ones nor can they even sign fringe major leaguers to fill holes and stunt their homegrown players’ development.

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        • stan says:

          I don’t recall anyone upset over the idea of shifting Matt Carpenter to second. After all, if Schumaker can do it, then it seemed like a worthwhile gamble. Plus, Wong was on the way so you wouldn’t want to block him. What pundits were howling for was a replacement at shortstop. It wouldn’t have hurt if that guy could play second. Taking a chance on Furcal recovering or Kozma keeping up last September’s magic seemed like a decent choice but in June the jig was up.
          There’s really no excuse to fail to improve the bench in July/ August though. There were a lot of free agents picked up by contenders that could have helped this team.
          Yes, the Cardinals ended up paying Cedeno $282K this year in addition to the $2.5M they are paying Wigginton this year and next. They obviously saw the need for a Wigginton-like player over the winter, but why they didn’t take a shot at Reynolds, D. Young, M. Young, Soriano, Byrd, etc. to fill that hole late in the season is a mystery.

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      • Bad Bill says:

        I disagree with your premise here. Sometimes the mark of a good front office is that it sits on its hands in the face of pundits howling for trades. This worked in Mozeliak’s favor in two big ways this year: avoiding gutting the farm to acquire a second baseman in place of the “unproven” Matt Carpenter, and doing the same to find a “proven” starting pitcher when Jaime Garcia went down. Trusting his player development system is going to reap him huge rewards not just this year but in the future.

        Wigginton was a screwup, but a relatively inexpensive one occupying the 25th slot on the roster until they unloaded him. Are they still paying Cedeno? I thought the terms of the contract were such that they weren’t.

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  6. AK7007 says:

    Hindsight. You are looking back and seeing a team win through luck, then assigning process that wasn’t there. The process is that they have good players. The Dodgers have even better players. Through the weighted coin flips that are playoff games, the Cards look good.

    You are doing what every idiot beatwriter does when their team wins and trying to assign significance to things that aren’t there.

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    • Bad Bill says:

      Going up 3-1 in the LCS at this writing is arguably luck; any team that wins playoffs has luck working for them, or at least, not against them. Winning 97 regular-season games isn’t luck.

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      • AK7007 says:

        And where in my comment did I reference the regular season? Where in the article was the regular season discussed? I’m saying that Mike is being stupid by trying to glean some significant way that they Cards are better than the Dodgers through the use of hindsight looking at 4 games. Not that the regular season has anything to do with it.

        His main argument was that the Cards have more depth, when in reality they are just differently deep, and the “ways they’ve won” came from the bench players who actually suck instead of ones which are strong: http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/the-cardinals-the-dodgers-and-depth/

        And if you really want to get into the Cardinal’s regular season record and luck? The RISP luck was crazy: http://www.baseballthinkfactory.org/newsstand/discussion/mlb_cardinals_set_new_risp_mark
        If they are so great with runners on, do they just give up whenever the bases are empty? Lazy or something? Or is it that the Cards ability lies somewhere in between the bases empty and RISP numbers, and they got lucky with sequencing?

        They are a good team, but open your eyes and challenge your assumptions from time to time. They aren’t this great.

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    • Jeff Gilham says:

      I’m not seeing why this comments get thumbs down 7 times. It strikes me as a valid point of view. I’m giving it a +1.

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    • CircleChange11 says:

      I agree.

      The “process” is having 17 of 25 players be homegrown, and that doesn’t include guys like Wainwright that were acquired by trading away “homegrown” talent.

      They’ve focused on hard throwing relievers and players that don’t always “fit the mold” in terms of ‘athleticism’ (Carpenter and Adams, Craig, Freese, and Ludwig … i.e., the “non-prospects”)).

      They’ve had two great 2-year contract signings (Berkman and Beltran) of veteran players and their big contracts (Holliday, Waino, etc have pretty much worked out.

      The team also lost their franchise player via free agency, and lost their #2 and perhaps best post-season pitcher for the year.

      Last year they made the playoffs, were 1 game away from the WS in a year following losing their franchise player and losing their ace during ST.

      The Cardinals are suceeding despite losing major players to free agency and suffering big injuries to key pitchers.

      There is probably some luck involved in all of the pitchers doing well, but there’s probably more3 “process” than luck going on.

      … or it could just be good karma as payback for the 85 WS, game 6.

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  7. Anon21 says:

    Could also be the judgment of the Baseball Gods upon the Dodgers for one of the more blatant attempts to buy a championship in recent memory, with the Cardinals as fortunate bystanders.

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    • AK7007 says:

      Did the Dodgers have a choice? McCourt left them with jack shit. I’d rather see them “buy” a championship than see the money end up in McCourt’s pocket (or even Magic’s for that matter)

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      • Anon21 says:

        It’s not that it would have been better for the money to be kept out of the team. It’s that everyone hates a big spender. It can be true both that the ownership group did the right thing by ponying up a lot of money for top-shelf talent and that fans of less fortunate teams are justified in hating the Dodgers for having the ownership group and media market to make what they’ve done possible.

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        • AK7007 says:

          Excellent, well said. Getting all that rational thought in with fan emotion.

          At this point, I hate both teams so much I feel like I’m watching Red Sox/Yankees. Can’t they both loose? Like, no World Series would be my preferred outcome.

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        • Anon21 says:

          Yeah, all of the remaining teams are pretty much as bad as one another to me. But I don’t even have the luxury of having a real hate-object to root against since both the Nationals and Phillies crammed all their garbage play into the regular season. (Not that I’m complaining, you understand.)

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  8. Anon says:

    Furcal is on the DL for the Cardinals as well.

    Also, Oscar Taveras would likely be at least on the bench (and maybe in CF) if he didn’t have the ankle injury at AAA this year.

    If Miller and Mujica were in top form along with Carpenter, Motte, and Garcia being healthy, that is video game type pitching.

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    • Jason B says:

      But to be fair, it’s super-duper rare to have an entire pitching staff in “top form” ever, much less in mid-October.

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    • gnomez says:

      Fixed it for you: “If Miller and Mujica were in top form along with Carpenter, Motte, and Garcia being healthy, that is video game Tigers type pitching.”

      And I say this as a Cardinals fan.

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    • Jim says:

      It’s hard to say ‘what if’ when it comes to injuries. Both teams have had injuries. The Cardinals have the guys you listed plus Craig. The Dodgers have 3 of their top 5 hitters hurt plus Beckett (not much of a loss at this point) and Billingsley. The Cardinals have done a great job of overcoming their injuries and part of the reason they’ve been able to do that is because of their outstanding farm system. They just churn out good players. That’s something I think the Dodgers will get to. It takes more than one year to overcome the way McCourt neglected scouting over the years.

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  9. KDL says:

    Why is Jay’s defense considered something “bouncing” LA’s way? He’s an average centerfielder, at best, and stats point to him being significantly worse than that this year. He’s part of the way that team is constructed.
    I’m not saying the Cardinals have gotten all the breaks. I just don’t think a team’s regular, uninjured CF playing about how you’d expect should really be considered something “bouncing” right for their opponent.

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    • Shannon says:

      3 or 4 bad misplays in a single game is NOT “about how you’d expect” Jay would normally play. He’s not good, and he’s probably not even average, but he’s not “3+ bad misplays per game” bad. Counting the terrible route on the ball by one of the Ellis dudes (I believe) in game 1, that is at least 1 bad misplay per game… which is not what you would expect from a slightly below average defender. That’s Adam Dunn territory, so yea, it is kind of a break for the Dodgers that Jay is playing so extraordinarily terrible in the field.

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    • Jay says:

      Well he also counts Ellis’s passed ball and Crawford’s abysmal throw as “bouncing” STL’s way.

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      • KDL says:

        I knew someone was going to turn this into Dodger v. Cardinal thing. (Even tried to avoid with that first sentence in the second mini-paragraph.) Whether Ellis’ or Crawford’s play are “bounces” have ZERO bearing on whether Jay’s playing is a “bounce” for the Dodgers. ZERO.
        FWIW, I would also classify Crawford’s throw as not-a-bounce. And I don’t know enough about Ellis’ catching to make a judgment. Still, that has nothing to do with Jay.

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    • CircleChange11 says:

      Likewise, the Dodgers putting Andre Ethier in CF, on a bum ankle no less, is hardly magic working the Cardinals way, it’s Don mattingly’s team being successful in spite of his managing.

      I thought the metrics had Jay being an average CF or slightly less. We all realize that being a slightly less than average fielding MLB CF means you can play some pretty damn good defense, right?

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  10. Chris says:

    I’m not sure how I feel about your level-headedness. I think I like it. I’m just not sure it belongs on the Internet.

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  11. Brian says:

    This is an excellent article all around. And all those who say the Cardinals have Devil Magic in October seem to forget that they were knocked out of the playoffs in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, and 2005 – each time to a team with a worse regular-season record. Their postseason magic is an illusion created by the fact that they’re a consistently well-run organization that has given itself many bites at the apple.

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  12. olethros says:

    Cardinal Red is the blood of sacrificed virgins.

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  13. Brendan says:

    sounds an awful lot like magic to me….

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  14. Rogers Hornsby says:

    Y’all can go fuck yourselves.

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  15. Turducken says:

    Did the Cardinals pick up the Devil that the Rays lost in 2007? Perhaps there was a back-room deal between Sternberg and DeWitt…

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