NLDS Game One Review: San Francisco

Two stories stand out in what was quietly the most competitive game of the playoffs so far: Tim Lincecum‘s dominance, and a crucial blown call.

As several people pointed out in the immediate aftermath, Tim Lincecum’s game score of 96 was actually higher than Roy Halladay‘s 94 in his no-hitter against Reds on Wednesday. This isn’t an endorsement of game score, but does make one think. After all, is a complete game two-hitter really that much less impressive than a no-hitter for a pitcher, given all the variables (fielders, “bad bounces,” ballparks, weather conditions, etc.) that go into the destiny of batted balls? While Lincecum gave up two hits to Halladay’s zero, Lincecum also struck out 14 to Doc’s 8. Then again, 10 of Lincecum’s batted balls were flylballs while 12 of Halladay’s 19 were grounders. I’m not choosing a side, and it doesn’t really matter. Halladay’s game will justifiably go down as one of the greatest in playoff history, but Lincecum’s should get at least a footnote.

Lincecum’s dominance made it seem as if the Giants were running away with the game, but, of course, they only won 1-0. As noted in the preview, Derek Lowe is no slouch. While Halladay’s no-hitter led fans to dub the playoffs “Doctober,” (a meme that became irritating about 15 minutes after it began) Braves starter Derek Lowe made a reasonable case for OctLOWEber, striking out 6 and (more impressively) getting 11 ground balls on 13 balls in play before getting pulled after five-and-a-third. For all the helplessness the Braves offense displayed, the Giants weren’t exactly ripping the cover off of the ball. This should be troubling since, although Lowe is a good pitcher, he’s probably only Atlanta’s third-best starter. Tommy Hanson and Tim Hudson aren’t going to make things any easier on the Giants hitters.

Unfortunately, the best game of the playoffs so far was marred by a blown call that set up the only (and thus deciding) run scored in the game. Leaving aside the larger discussion of officiating going on elsewhere, let’s focus on the sequence of the half-inning, since it features not only an officiating blunder, but some “interesting” tactical decisions. Buster Posey singled to lead off the bottom of the fourth. With one on and no outs, and Pat Burrell at the at the plate, either San Francisco manager Bruce Bochy (or perhaps Posey himself) decided it would be a good time to attempt a steal. Although Posey is probably faster than most other catchers, he’s no speed demon, and hasn’t successfully stolen a base in the majors this season. While Brian McCann isn’t Yadier Molina behind the plate, he’s not Ryan Doumit, either. Of course, it “worked” as Posey took the base, despite replays showing that he was tagged out. After Burrell struck out followed by a Juan Uribe whiff, Bobby Cox made a questionable decision to intentionally walk Pablo Sandoval in order to get Lowe the platoon advantage against Cody Ross (the double play potential is irrelevant with two outs), and Ross singled to score Posey for what turned out to be the game’s deciding run.

It’s worth running through the sequence less to emphasize the blown call (which was undoubtedly the key event in the game given what came after) or the curious tactical choices (Bochy kept it up by sending Aubrey Huff, of all people, in the ninth inning; he got gunned down by McCann). Rather, it again reinforces the reality of just how close this game really was, despite Lincecum blowing the Braves away left and right. Giants fans will justifiably remember Lincecum’s awesome performance for a long time. But given San Francisco’s own offensive impotence against the Braves third-best starter, it shouldn’t make them feel overly confident heading into Games Two and Three.




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Matt Klaassen reads and writes obituaries in the Greater Toronto Area. If you can't get enough of him, follow him on Twitter.

86 Responses to “NLDS Game One Review: San Francisco”

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  1. The Nicker says:

    Meme 1: Year of the Pitcher?

    Meme 2: REPLAY please

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  2. WY says:

    “After all, is a complete game two-hitter really that much less impressive than a no-hitter for a pitcher, given all the variables (fielders, “bad bounces,” ballparks, weather conditions, etc.) that go into the destiny of batted balls?”

    It depends on what kind of hits they were. The Braves’ two hits were both legitimately hard-hit doubles. I think this is a case-by-case thing in general. Obviously these were two outstanding pitching performances. Halladay had fewer strikeouts, but he also needed about 15 fewer pitches to finish the game.

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    • opisgod says:

      The result was pretty, but one look at Tim’s pitch plot showed a disaster waiting to happen. Half his fastballs were so far out of the zone no one swung at them, and the other half were right down the middle and belt high, Literally. And somehow the Braves whiffed on sixteen of these. The Braves took themselves out of the game, it was basically everything you don’t want to do, ending up with a good result.

      http://www.brooksbaseball.net/pfxVB/cache/numlocation.php-pitchSel=453311&game=gid_2010_10_07_atlmlb_sfnmlb_1&batterX=0&innings=yyyyyyyyy&sp_type=1&s_type=2.gif

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      • SF 55 for life says:

        well I guess you will just have to wait longer tough guy.

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      • opisgod says:

        Uh, what?

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      • Brandon says:

        I think he’s assuming ou are a Braves fan? Hard to tell with some people…

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      • SF 55 for life says:

        nah just being an ass.

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      • Nick says:

        Right, because it’s so easy to hit a high fastball with fading movement after throwing changeups in the dirt.

        Opisgod, have you not heard of “changing the sight lines”?

        There was a reason all of your hitters were extremely late on ALL of those fastballs.

        Timmy was phenomenal. Quit making excuses on why he pitched so well.

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      • opisgod says:

        Must be a shared trait, only Giant’s fans are ever this defensive. I love the team-affiliation assumption, there must be no possibility of a neutral opinion in your minds.

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      • Nick says:

        Not being defensive, just rational. You don’t seem to understand the concept of “changing the sight lines”. If you throw changeups low in the zone like Timmy did, it’s obviously harder to square up the 92 mph 2-seamer that is running across the zone at the letters. If you don’t understand this, you don’t understand pitching.

        Btw I thought Lowe threw a great game as well so I’m definitely not biased. But Lincecum leads the league in K’s for a reason. His 2 seam fastball up in the zone is one of them.

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      • SF 55 for life says:

        I didn’t assume you were a Braves fan, more of a Lincecum hater. Clearly you have not seen many Lincecum starts if you think this was a “disaster waiting to happen.”

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      • eldingo says:

        Dude Giants fans finally our team return to the playoffs, and Timmy has arguably the best playoff pitching performance in Giant’s playoff history, and you have to be this much of a d-bag about it?

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      • CircleChange11 says:

        Right, because it’s so easy to hit a high fastball with fading movement after throwing changeups in the dirt.

        Don’t waste your time. It’s been my experience that people have no idea of what mid 90s heat actually looks like, let alone what kind of freakish reactions it takes to make contact. Furthermore, they don’t want to know …. they want to complain and jest.

        Earlier this year TL55 made AP5 look foolish, swining at sliders in the dirt. Either Lincecum’s pitches are very hard to read, recognize, and hit …. or hitters just get incredibly dumb in the box when TL55′s on the mound.

        I have said it before that there are guys like TL55 who CANNOT pitch to contact. There stuff is just so good that even when they groove pitches they don’t always get hammered (or even contact made). It kills me that the assumption is batters will eventually make him pay. Don’t we have 3 seasons worth of TL55 dominance? Is this where he puts up 7 great season and has a down one on the 8th and someone says “See, I told ya.”

        Wasn’t there an article here earlier about how TL55 was losing velocity and this was the start of his decline & demise?

        Normally I might agree with something like that, except for the talent level of TL55. He’s not even a typical major league talent. He’s an elite talent at the highest level. Thus, he’s going to be the exception to a few things.

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      • Alan says:

        Soooo how does this whole “changing the sight line” argument explain the Braves swinging at balls in the dirt after 3 straight balls in the dirt before that. Seems like about half of their strikeouts were them just assuming Lincecum would throw a fastball down the middle on a full count.

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      • SF 55 for life says:

        @Alan
        He has been getting swings and misses on that pitch for the last two years now. His change/split is one of the best pitches in baseball. Sure to us at home it looks like a ball in the dirt but to the batter it’s a pitch that looks like a strike and then totally breaks off the table.

        The threat of a high fastball coming from a pitcher where it is very difficult to get a read on his release point makes his change/split so dangerous. And now he has a new 87mph slider to mix in as well. Lincecum has really changed himself since joining the league, he looks like a completely different pitcher than the one I remember watching in 2007 at home against Philadelphia. He really is a remarkable talent.

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      • Tommy says:

        Except it wasn’t the change/split, it was the new slider (slightly different grip) that he developed in August and used in September with great results.

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    • Wally says:

      Halladay also gave up several very well hit balls, they just happen to be hit close enough towards fielders to be caught. Unless you think a pitcher can control the vector on which the ball is hit within, oh, 5 degrees….

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  3. SF 55 for life says:

    im pretty fucking confident to tell you the truth.

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  4. Kevin Yost says:

    YAY OFFENSIVE IMPOTENCE!!

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  5. Phantom Stranger says:

    The game would have gone into extra innings tied scoreless if not for the blown call on the steal. The umpire had a very unusual strike zone all night for both pitchers, in different ways.

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    • Nick says:

      The game would have gone to extras if your 3rd basemen knew how to field a groundball.

      Hard to complain about a call when you boot your chance to get out of it the very next batter.

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      • bsally says:

        No it’s still very easy to complain about a call because even if the Braves had the chance to get out of it they still deserve competent umpiring. They shouldn’t have been in the situation in the first place.

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  6. markdash says:

    Posey stole second on strike 3 to Burrell.

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  7. Anon21 says:

    This matches up nicely with my own take. Yes, our hitters looked foolish against Lincecum, and yes, we’ve confirmed that the bottom of the order is completely useless, but if that was the best the Giants could muster against Lowe, they could easily get shut out by Hanson, Hudson, and the ‘pen. All signs point to this being an extremely low-scoring series, and I think the Braves have just as good a chance to scratch out a couple runs against Cain and Sanchez as the Giants do against Hanson and Hudson.

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    • Nate says:

      Well, Lowe is the worst pitcher type for the Giants to face (hard sinker guy) so I’d expect them to do worse against him and Hudson than Hanson.

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      • Anon21 says:

        Are they specifically bad against that pitch type, or is it more the groundball in general that tends to dog them? Hudson, after all, posted the highest GB rate in the majors this season.

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      • Anon21 says:

        Sorry, misread as “worse against him than Hudson and Hanson.” Makes more sense now, and you’re probably right. Still, Tommy’s a very dominating strikeout-type pitcher when he’s got his stuff working right. He won’t be an easy match for the Giants, IMO.

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      • Nick says:

        And Cain is a good matchup for the Braves?

        Am I reading that right, Anon?

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      • Anon21 says:

        No. The Replacement All-Stars have no good matchups.

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      • CircleChange11 says:

        When a sinkerballer is on, they’re the worst type of pitcher for everyone. What they’re throwing is hard, late breaking, and breaking down. You just can’t get consistent good contact and loft on a pitch nlike that. At least with a flamethrower, you know it’s generally going to be straight, and you just have to catch-up.

        With a sinkerball, the ball is running away from your barrel, or you have to decide if that inside pitch is a sinker running over the corner, or a fastball that’s going to break your bat.

        Sinkerballs are a bitch. Again, hard sinker guys are the worst pitcher type for everyone. Luckily, they seem to struggle with being “on” consistently.

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  8. cencalfan says:

    I don’t blame Bochy for trying to manufacture runs and keep this team out of double plays. We’re slow as hell, but hey, you gotta try to make something happen.

    Lincecum was just unbelievable. I can’t wait to see some of the breakdowns on his performance.

    However, the way the Giants hitters handled a groundball pitcher in Lowe doesn’t bode well their upcoming encounter with Hudson.

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    • Nick says:

      I’d agree with this. Lowe’s sinker was magnificent tonight. Hudson is probably going to be tougher.

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      • bsally says:

        I don’t blame him either, but I just question the strategy of having a very slow runner going with no one out and a strikeout-prone hitter up (28.2 K%).

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    • chuckb says:

      I agree that, considering Lowe’s GB tendencies, sending Posey on the 3-2 pitch was the right plan. Burrell just whiffed, and then the ump did as well.

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      • Wally says:

        Agreed as well. And to put some numbers to it, though they will be heavily simplified, and not really consider the match up:

        Burrell has walked or hit a HR in about 40% of his 3-2 counts. So, the SB attempt is going to meaningless 40% of the time.

        Burrell strikes out in 28% of his 3-2 counts.

        For some reference in 2010, the NL struck out 24% of the time in 3-2 counts. And walked or HR in 31% of their PAs. So, Burrell is putting many few balls in play. Which is good and bad from this stand point. Since, that means more chances for a strike-em-out-throw-em-out.

        Anyway. This means 28% of the we’re looking for a thrown out chance. Then McCann throws out about 24% of runners. So, if we assume Posey is just average that’s only about a 6.7% of the time he runs that he’ll get caught and 21% of the time he’ll safely steal.

        Now, with runners on 1st and less than two out, Lowe gets about 18% of batters that don’t K, BB or HR to GIDP. So for Burrell that 18% can only happen in about 32% of his PAs. So lets say that’s about 6% chance of a double play that is avoided. Also in about 24% of the balls in play Lowe allows a single, which would allow a would be stealer to go 1st to 3rd, which would happen about 7.5% of the time.

        So if we use a simple run expectancy matrix here, we get that this play added about .12 runs. Now if you want to assume that going 1st to 3rd happens maybe 1/3 of the time anyway you could take off maybe .005. Or if you want to assume Posey isn’t going to safe that often on the steal you could maybe take off .02-.04 runs. But this is pretty clearly a positive play. I think the runner has to be pretty bad to not make running on big time ground ball guy worth it with a runner on 1st and less than two out. That double play just kills you.

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  9. jponrye says:

    Bochy is obsessed with hit and runs, which is what happened when both Posey and Huff took off, I think.

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    • SF 55 for life says:

      OMG ITS JPONRY!!! MCCOVEYCHRONICLES!!!

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    • Zach says:

      I felt that Bochy should done something happen with Torres on and Sanchez at-bat. Admittedly, it was the first inning, but considering the players involved, as well as the eventual result (4-6-3 DP), you’d think that would be the perfect situation.

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    • Kevin Yost says:

      I know, right? The guy needs to relax the hit and runs, especially with a team like the Giants where baserunners are scarce.

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      • Nick says:

        Cool it with the hit and runs? His team set a franchise record for double plays this year. After Freddy in the 1st, you could understand why Bochy wanted to get movement to try and stay out of the DP.

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  10. Mr. OctBROber says:

    I posted this in the other article but it would be more appropriate here- 25 Swings and misses for Lincecum. Doc had 17 yesterday. Probably has a lot more to do with the pitchers than the offense they were facing (though some of the blame has to go to hitters not making contact.) http://bit.ly/cdugez http://bit.ly/ar0uV2 These two links are to brooks baseball showing their release points between both pitchers during their first playoff games. It’s unbelievable how consistant Halladay is. Lincecum has such good stuff.

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  11. giantsfan says:

    good outing by timmy, but he missed his spots quite a bit.. especially with the fastball. on top of providing a great explanatory link, opisgod makes a great point.. the braves took themselves out of this one by swinging at pitches out of the zone (like the 3-2 split-change to heyward in the 9th bounced in front of home). i guess that’s the advantage of having dominating stuff.

    additionally, bochy did not just decide to send his runner, it was a 3-2 hit and run to burrell, not uribe.

    finally, the sole run came across the plate on a grounder that went under infante’s glove. how is this not mentioned??

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  12. Obsessivegiantscompulsive says:

    Just because Lowe shut down the Giants and he is the “third” worst starter does not mean that the other starters will shut down the Giants. By that specious logic, then I could say similarly that Lincecum had worse ERA than Cain or Sanchez, so they should shut down Braves even more.

    FYI, the Giants scored on and beat a lot of good starters this season, including Halladay and Oswalt. And they played the Braves even, if I recall right. This will be a tight series and many games will turn on something small like a missed call (though to be fair, the pitcher could have still pitched his way out, easily, and umps owe Giants for blown Mets call), a stupid walk, a mistake blasted for a key homer. And as anyone can see, the Giants pitchers have not made many mistakes over the last month, as they went 20-10 with their Rally Thong, while the Braves sputtered into the playoffs with a poor record in the last month of play. The Giants have momentum in their favor, particularly with the game one win.

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    • Nick says:

      As always, well said OGC.

      Braves fans like to throw out the fact they got Hanson on the hill, but they also forget they’re facing Matt Cain, probably a top 5 #2 starter in the game.

      Edge IMO would be to Cain, and he’s facing the lesser of the lineups.

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    • For the record, I didn’t make that argument. In fact, I think the Giants have the overall edge. Hanson and Cain are very evenly matched, but while the Giant’s offense is better than the Braves’, it still isn’t any great shakes overall. They still have to face good pitching. The Giants are the better team and the Game One win puts them at an obvious advantage. My points was that the Braves’ situation isn’t hopeless, and that’s mainly due to their starting pitching.

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      • Tommy says:

        Don’t worry, Matt. Giants fans just have incredible eyesight. They can read things between the lines that don’t actually exist. Like perceived slights toward Giants pitchers. I’m kidding Giants fans, but on this thread you do generally come off as very sensitive.

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    • "hi, i'm freaky" says:

      they beat Oswalt like a drum time and time again – but it seems like he’s always facing Lincecum whenever he starts vs. the Giants…Oswalt is 6-8 lifetime vs SFG…

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  13. Ryan says:

    BTW,

    Check the replay of the Huff CS. He was safe. Blown calls happen on close plays; deal with it.

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    • bsally says:

      No he wasn’t. It was closer but he was also clearly out.

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      • Nick says:

        No bsally, he was safe. Your homerism is shining right through. At least Giant fans will admit that Posey was out. Man up and quit crying. The braves weren’t going to touch Timmy or the bullpen that whole night.

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      • GLB says:

        Nick, your homerism is shining to bright for any others to be seen. Blinded by the light buddy. Instant replay showed both runners were out. And how in gods name do you how one of the Giant’s arms from the pen would have come in and thrown.

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      • Nick says:

        Yeah okay, gas lamp ball. Hope you’re having fun watching the post season, another one bites the dust for your padres.

        Huff was safe. Posey was out. Watch the replay closely next time.

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  14. sam says:

    It is not Uribe, it is Pat Burrell who strikes out while Posey is trying to steal second base !!! Uribe also strikes out after that. Please fix the article. It looks really bad for an error like this this to happen on a leading baseball website.

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  15. Giant Torture says:

    For all the prognosticating, and would’ve should’ve could’ve, the Giants threatened a whole lot more than the Braves did, but couldn’t come up with a timely hit. Also, The ball Posey hit is out in Atlanta and probably out in San Francisco in the daytime.

    Secondly, Lowe is Atlanta’s hottest pitcher right now and was lights out in August while Hudson was pretty meh. The Braves haven’t even seen the Giants hottest pitchers yet in Sanchez and Bumgarner, but Matt Cain’s pretty good too.

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    • "hi, i'm freaky" says:

      prob not gonna face Bumgarner anyway…can’t wait to see what Sanchez can do after a good Sept. and the clincher game vs. San Diego…

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  16. maguro says:

    The stolen base was a blown call, but Infante should have fielded Ross’ grounder, it went right through his glove.

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  17. Jeff Wise says:

    Lincecum’s breaking pitches were absolutely nasty. He had the Braves off balance because of it. How are you supposed to key in on the fastball when you know he’s capable of throwing the off speed stuff?

    Even when the Braves sat on fastballs they still couldn’t get good contact.

    Expect a different game plan the next time the Braves face him.

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  18. DT says:

    Big Time Timmy Jim…sorry had to say it

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  19. bill says:

    Great pitching performance by Lincecum.

    But wow, those two lineups have some *bad* hitters.

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  20. speckops says:

    To be fair to Lincecum, 4 of those 10 flyouts were popups. And given that popups and K’s are virtually equal in out percentage (>99%), that means that *18* of his 27 recorded outs were guaranteed.

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  21. NEPP says:

    Great debate on Lincecum and Doc. Both had amazing Game 1 efforts. Sadly for Mitchy Kramer, his will be but a footnote while Doc is immortal.

    I do think it is almost more impressive to force guys to weakly groundout (and all of Doc’s groundouts were weak…none were hard shots at infielders) than it is to K them sometimes. Both pitched to their strengths and if they meet up in a Game 1 of the NLCS, it will be historic. It could end up being a 0-0 game into the 10th…with Doc still in there. I dont see Charlie getting Doc off the mound in a playoff game unless he goes out there with Philadelphia SWAT.

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  22. Objesguy44 says:

    I wouldn’t necessarily say Derek Lowe is the “third” best starter behind Hanson and Hudson. Lowe’s FIP is lower than Hudson’s (3.89 to 4.09) and his xFIP is better than both Hanson and Hudson’s (Lowe’s 3.65 xFIP is better than Hudson’s 3.87 and Hanson’s 4.04).

    I think you could make the argument that Hanson is better (better K/9, very good K/BB ratio) but Hudson’s numbers are questionable. .250 BABIP and 81.2 strand rate while only supporting a K/BB ratio of 1.88 (A Barry Zito-esque K/BB ratio)? It just seems he’s been far luckier than Lowe or even Hanson this year rather than better.

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  23. AK707 says:

    Well, all I can think is “Giants baseball: Torture!”

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  24. moebius says:

    So, where is the criticism of Buster Posey being “amateur hour” for knowing he was out, yet staying on 2nd after the umpire’s call? Or is that reserved for Jeter?

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    • KC says:

      Uh, not the best comparison there, moebius.

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    • SF 55 for life says:

      Lol it’s a compeltely different situation. The only reason Jeter got on is because he FAKED being hit. Enough of this story, enjoy baseball and shut your face.

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      • moebius says:

        The only reason Posey got on was he FAKED making it to 2B before being tagged out. So…Posey WASN’T cheating when he knew he was out but let the ump call him safe?

        FWIW, I actually agree with both of you that what happened was a non-story & good baseball from Posey’s perspective, and more about the terrible umpiring in the post-season.

        But I find the lack of comment & double standard funny. Just to be clear: Posey’s silence at a call he knew was wrong (and smartass response in the post-game) = good baseball. Jeter’s silence = bush league cheating.

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      • Nick says:

        @Moebius How was Posey’s responses smart ass? He basically admitted that he was out and added some humor. Jeter ended up completely denying it the whole time after his game.

        Apples and Oranges.

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      • moebius says:

        That’s categorically false:

        Jeter’s response (NYT): “Asked where the ball hit, Jeter smiled. ‘The bat,’ he said. And nowhere else? ‘Well, I mean, they told me to go to first,’ he said.”

        Posey’s response (NYT): “‘I guess it’s a good thing we don’t have instant replay,’ Posey said. ‘It was a beautiful slide, wasn’t it?’”

        This might be MY (old-school) bias talking, but if I were the umps I would take more offense at Posey. Probably because he’s a rookie, and not the face of baseball, but I felt like he was showing up the umps much more than Jeter (or Posada with that phantom tag earlier this year).

        All I’m saying: Same situation. Posey’s “cheating” won the game for his team (and a playoff game, no less), Jeter’s did not. Both knew for sure that the umps made a wrong call that benefited them, yet they “sold” their innocence.

        Personally, I’m fine with both plays. Yet people on this site who would kill Jeter say nothing about Posey, which stinks of hypocrisy and bias to me.

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      • Nick says:

        Okay fair enough Moebius. I didn’t see that particular quote from Jeter, and was wrong.

        I would agree with you that I’m fine with both plays, and yes there might be some bias going on when it involves the Jeter hate.

        Something I wouldn’t agree with you is that Posey showed the umps up and is a smart ass. What is he supposed to say? Lie and say he was safe?

        I think it’s safe to say most people bashed Jeter unfairly for that play, but you also are unfairly bashing Posey because he is a rookie.

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      • moebius says:

        I think that’s fair…I was being a little “old-guardy” with Posey. Rookies should be seen and not heard and all that. I guess Jeter & Posey basically responded in the same way (contra let’s say Matt Holliday in 2007).

        I have no issue with the play, and wouldn’t disagree that this is really about bad umpires & not “cheating”, since I consider both plays to be “good gamesmanship”.

        It’s just the bias of the media & commentariat that galls me.

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  25. Matt says:

    I actually think Posey is pretty slow for a catcher, though the author might be comparing him to previous catcher Bengie Molina, in which case a turtle would have above average speed for a Giants catcher. I would take Huff and even Pablo Sandoval in a steal attempt over Buster (Huff 7 for 7 on steals this year!).

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    • "hi, i'm freaky" says:

      correct on Huff…i think he has deceptive speed….7 for 7 this year even though only about 50% previously in his career….definitely does not warrant an “of all people, Aubrey Huff?” by the author of this article…

      and Pablo was surprisingly quick also before he added all the weight…

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      • RoyaleWithCheese says:

        “before he added all the weight…”

        When was this? Pablo looked just as heavy when he was called up two years ago as he does now. You’re right, though. He is surprisingly quick, given his weight.

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  26. TexasRanger says:

    the Giants only managed to eke out one run but they had a good game against lowe. they drew four walks and had 8 baserunners, they just couldn’t cash in. Its not an overwhelming advantage but with home field and game one down, I think the Giants really should get this series.

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  27. Horace says:

    Halladay’s game was so much more impressive because the Reds offense is actully quite good while the Braves is in relative shambles. Lincecum had the good stuff last night, but he was facing a lineup that is a shadow of what got the Braves into the playoffs.

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    • Nick says:

      Good point, I would agree. Lincecum might have had a better game score, but Halladay shut down the best offense in the league.

      Nod goes to Halladay.

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  28. This is an extremely interesting article. I’ll bookmark me

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