Organizational Rankings: #28 – Washington

Okay, so they won’t be celebrating this ranking in the nation’s capital, but this actually does represent a pretty significant improvement from last year, when I considered ranking them behind a few colleges and the East Cobb youth development program out of Georgia. That they were able to climb out of the 30th spot is an accomplishment, considering the hole they were attempting to climb out of. There is still a really long way to go, but progress has been made.

Obviously, drafting and signing Strasburg helped. They now have a pair of franchise players, as he will team with Ryan Zimmerman to give the club two guys to market like crazy. But the improvements in 2009 didn’t end there. The Nyjer Morgan trade was terrific, giving the team a legitimate center fielder who can also hit a bit. They also added Josh Willingham without surrendering much in return, and while he’s getting a little long in the tooth for a rebuilding team, he should be a nice trade chip this summer.

But, that’s going to be the key. Washington did a decent job of adding low cost assets last year, but they have to recognize that they’re still completely rebuilding, and they have to be willing to flip those assets when they have the chance. Forget the extension of Adam Dunn – they should be trading him, not signing him long term. There just isn’t enough talent in the Nationals organization to contend any time soon. They need to be stockpiling assets that they control for multiple years at below market rates, and guys like Dunn and Willingham don’t fit the criteria. The signing of Ivan Rodriguez, Adam Kennedy, and Jason Marquis don’t indicate that it’s a priority for the Nationals either, and that’s too bad.

There are pieces in place that could be the foundation of a good Washington team. The park is nice, the ownership is willing to spend some money, there are some quality young players, and the new front office has done enough encouraging things to give fans some hope, but it’s going to take patience. They can’t veer from the rebuilding path. Rizzo and his staff have to commit themselves to the future, because the present isn’t going to be very pretty.

If they do, better days are ahead. If they get lured into an extension for Dunn and fail to capitalize on the tradeable assets they have, it could really set them back. This is a big year for the Washington front office. They’ve got some big decisions to get right.




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Dave is a co-founder of USSMariner.com and contributes to the Wall Street Journal.


50 Responses to “Organizational Rankings: #28 – Washington”

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  1. JR says:

    Not that this is what the article is really about, but their stadium is nothing special. The sight lines aren’t that great, all of the detailing that should have been finished in April of ’08 remained unfinished in September of ’09, the upper deck is too steep and withdrawn from the field, the first base line faces two parking garages, and there is no view of the river and only a nominal view of the Capitol.

    Also, the premium seats behind home plate, which is what gets most of the off-field attention on tv, are mostly empty for every non-Yankees/Phillies game. The team has finished in the bottom 1/3 of attendance every year since the first year in DC, and although DC is a bandwagon town (like the Caps love), with the oft-frugal ownership and the poor TV and radio deals they have, it’s hard to imagine the revenue improving significantly enough to put a product on the field that people will come out to watch en masse.

    Additionally, with the location of the stadium far away from the people who actually go the games, it’ll always be easier for much of the potential fanbase to drive to Baltimore. If the Orioles can contend in the next 2-3 years, the future market for DC becomes even smaller.

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    • Casadilla says:

      I have to agree with pretty much your entire critique. They are in a no win situation, and didn’t belong in DC in the first place. The DC-Baltimore region just cannot support 2 baseball teams that aren’t going to stay competitive year in, year out.

      Just one comment though, what town isn’t a bandwagon town? If your team sucks, people eventually stop caring. It’s happen even to the Yankees and the Red Sox.

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      • Temo says:

        As I mentioned below, DC really isn’t watching the Orioles… AT ALL. The way the geography of the area is laid out, it’s hard for any team in Baltimore to have a presence outside of Maryland and maybe Delaware, whereas DC has a large presence in Northern Virginia, which is very ripe for the picking in terms of acquiring fans.

        If you consider the NFL, the Ravens have a very localized (yet passionate) audience, while the Redskins make a killing off out-of-town fans, especially those in Northern Virginia. And those folks in Northern Virginia rarely travel to Baltimore to support anything from there.

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      • JR says:

        I meant bandwagon in the sense that combined with the other economic realities (radio & tv, scope of the brand), it’ll be hard for the Nats to generate revenue and grow their brand without stringing winning season together, and since that’s not in the foreseeable future I don’t know when that’ll happen. If Baltimore’s emergence happens first, it could siphon off a new generation of fans that haven’t become attached to the Nats.

        One more major thing: the Nats, as far as I could tell, have done little until the last year to reach out to the Black community in DC. Given their stadium location, they need better advertising and outreach into a city that’s 55% Black. They missed a major opportunity by naming the team Nats instead of Grays, which is significant in a city where a large percentage of the Black community are Cowboys fans instead of Redskins because the Redskins were the last/among the last to integrate.

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      • I’ll second the sentiments if you’re in NOVA or DC, going to Baltimore is not easier. I live right on the orange line and it’s a no-brainer for me to go to a Nats game over the Orioles, especially with the insane traffic on 495 on weekdays.

        Driving to RFK was very easy and even though it was a total dump, I kind of liked it anyway. I don’t think the new stadium is awful either, it’s just nothing special.

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      • Temo says:

        JR: As a Braves fan, I can tell you that there is no easy way to reach out to the “Black Community”. The Braves’ last hope seems to be that they will develop an elite African American ballplayer in Jason Heyward.

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      • JR says:

        I agree that going to an O’s game is not in the cards for anyone living on the NOVA side, or most places inside the district. However, once you start getting to places like Friendship Heights or Takoma/Silver Spring and beyond, a lot of people would rather drive to Baltimore. The exception is living up there, but working downtown.

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      • Omar says:

        As a representative of Black Baltimorians I must say that I fully endorse the Washington Nationals over the Baltimore Orioles.

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    • Dan says:

      I actually disagree regarding your last paragraph. For anyone living in DC, or in Arlington, Alexandria, and even Fairfax, or for folks in MD along the metros, it is MUCH easier to get to Nationals Park than up to Baltimore. I’d rather a 20 minute train ride than a 90 minute car ride any day.

      As for all of the issues people have with the stadium, please. Its a stadium. Do you go to a ballpark for the stadium? Yes, maybe the first time you go to a game at Fenway or to Wrigley. Or maybe if you try to hit up a stadium if you’re in town on business and you want to check it off your list, but that doesn’t keep casual fans away.

      You are right though that DC is a town that is, Redskins aside, a front-running/bandwagon town. The Capitals are all of a sudden the hottest ticket in the world. Why? Because they’ve got the best hockey player in the world and one of the best teams in the NHL. Wizards hype took over a few years ago before Gilbert, Jamison, and Butler all had separate injury issues and everything that has happened since. People here, for the most part, just don’t care about any team that isn’t a contender.

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      • Temo says:

        The bandwagon argument is silly. For one thing, wouldn’t you think less of a town that had the best hockey player in the world and DIDN’T get excited over the team?

        And New York is basically the only place in the US that will support a losing basketball team (maybe Oakland too).

        I don’t think DC is any more bandwagon-y than any other city, for the most part.

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      • B says:

        Maybe?! That’s all we get? Over the past 16 seasons counting this one, we’ve made the playoffs once in a league where more than half the teams make the playoffs, and we’re still 10th in the league in attendance this year! Give the Bay more credit than a maybe, c’mon!

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      • Omar says:

        Is Ovi better than Sid the Kid?

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    • Will says:

      You make several good points. The stadium is nothing special. It’s nice, but it doesn’t have that x-factor that will hold up after the “new car smell” wears off in a few years. They also blew it by not maximizing the potential of building a stadium blocks from the Capitol and putting in those horrible garages instead of putting them below ground or putting some sort of facade on them.

      However, I do dispute your claim that DC is a bandwagon city. It’s just a city that doesn’t care much for its crappy teams with the big exception being its football team. The Redskins have the longest sold out game streak in the NFL in the largest stadium in the league, despite being pretty terrible for the last 20 years.

      Also, I’m not sure how the location of the stadium is a problem. They are the Washington Nationals after all, not the Fairfax Nats or the Gaithersburg Nats. The stadium is metro accessible and parking isn’t convenient at any urban stadium. Besides some people in Howard and upper-Montgomery County, I don’t know who else in the DC area has an easier time getting to O’s games, and I’m not sure these were ever the people who were actually going to the games.

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      • JR says:

        That was based on my own preference: I lived in Bethesda for three years, and on the weekends, it’s a 45 minute metro ride to Nats Stadium (not sure if weekend trains are still running 20 minutes apart like they were for most of ’08 and ’09). I’d rather hop in the car and drive the 30 minutes to a (much, much) nicer and less expensive park. Plus, getting crammed into an overwhelmed green line car was not my ideal experience (again, personal preference).

        For people further north and northeast (meaning northeast along the Beltway), it’s even quicker to get to Baltimore. I know Thursday, Friday and Sunday nights are different stories, but most of the other time it’s not that bad to get to a game up there.

        As for DC’s bandwagonness, the best evidence I can give is the anomalous attendance spikes for the Caps in ’99 and ’09, and the huge valleys for the other nine years.

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      • Will says:

        Fair enough, though I can’t say I’ve ever made it from Silver Spring to Baltimore in anywhere close to 30 minutes for a 7:00 Orioles game.

        Regarding the Caps, I think you’ve overstated their bandwagon case. I only have the numbers from 2001, but between 2001 and 2004, their attendance never dropped below 14,700/game, and averaged closer to 16,000/game over the 4 years.

        It was lower after the strike, but they were also one of the worst teams in the league. However, their attendance records were comparable to the Blackhawks and Bruins, but I don’t think you’re going to call Boston and Chicago bandwagon fans just because they didn’t come out in droves to support their shitty hockey team.

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      • JR says:

        In case anyone still checks this, this is where I got the numbers from: http://www.andrewsstarspage.com/index.php/site/comments/nhl_average_attendance_since_1989_90/118-2008-09

        I didn’t check every year’s numbers, but it jives with attendance numbers I’ve seen on ESPN. It shows a huge drop starting in 2000 and culminating in ’06-07. Attendance was even mediocre during the ’07-08 season — until well after Glen Hanlon was fired. And no one, NO ONE, wore Caps attire until the ’08 playoffs. I can’t blame the people who had to deal with the 90s logo, but when they went back to the classic the shirts weren’t bad.

        As for 30 minutes to Baltimore, maybe that’s low but on a Tuesday or Wednesday night you can make it from the Conn Ave exit on 495 to Baltimore in 45 minutes, which is the same as taking the metro down to Nats stadium from Bethesda station.

        Omar: Ovi, every day. It’s all in the game.

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    • Keith says:

      Jr said: “…the premium seats behind home plate, which is what gets most of the off-field attention on tv, are mostly empty for every non-Yankees/Phillies game.”

      When I attended last year, those seats weren’t empty. They gave them to returning Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans, who were introduced to a standing ovation. The management isn’t totally stupid from a marketing standpoint.

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      • JR says:

        They gave the second tier of seats above the stone wall to the returning veterans, which is a great gesture. However, the seats in the lowest tier, spanning two sections directly behind home plate, are typically empty unless the Yankees, Phillies, etc are in town.

        As for the management not being stupid from a marketing standpoint, I did enjoy the free cone and player outings on Mondays at Gifford’s.

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  2. Josh in DC says:

    The park is not nice.

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  3. bobo says:

    I don’t think they should be trading guys like Dunn, they are trying to grow a market down there, and he is a fan favorite. People like watching guys hit lots of Home Runs, and Dunn does that.

    They can’t all follow the Tampa Bay Devil Rays blue print and suck for 10 years to get lots of draft picks, the owners and fans would rather see…what, you mean they have sucked for 10 years…nevermind

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    • JR says:

      Half of those people that like watching Dunn won’t even live there in three years.

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    • B says:

      I just don’t understand how Dunn is in the National League. He’s such a unique player and has so much more value as a DH than anywhere else, it just doesn’t make sense for him to be in the NL. If you look at last year, he accumulated 35.5 batting runs but gave it all back in the field (by his UZR, at least). Throw that line into a DH role, assuming he accumulates about 30 runs or so offensively (supposedly DH’s tend to hit a bit worse than they would if they played the field consistently?), factor in a -17.5 positional adjustment, +2- replacement, and you’re looking at a 3.25 WAR player instead of 1.3 WAR. Why is he in the NL? Why didn’t any AL team sign him last year? Seems Dunn could give a team a much needed boost going into the season right now, the Nationals should definitely see if an AL team is interested.

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    • Bob R. says:

      It’s not the point of this thread, but you misrepresent what the Rays have done and how important their high draft position has been. When they won in 2008, there were very few high draft picks on the team which was made up primarily of lower round picks, traded players and free agents of various stripes.

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    • Reuben says:

      The Nats already do suck; they should be working to get better, but they’d rather keep a 70 win team on the field and eventually LOSE their best assests (Zimmerman and Strasbourg).

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  4. Everyone Else says:

    JR, way to turn it into a political matter. Spoken like a true political operative. Someone get JR a job with Dayton Moore. He appreciates colossal intellects who don’t care about statistical analysis.

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    • JR says:

      What’s political about that? I don’t like the stadium, and other commenters have concurred. It has less of a relation to the idea of politicking than your ad hominen attack.

      It’s legitimate to have concerns about the management and long-term viability of baseball in DC due to the interest of the market and the poor media rights deals forced on them by MLB and Angelos.

      Market analysis is a statistical component of baseball, just like wOBA and FIP. To decry the mention of a sub-standard stadium, poor market traction, and low attendance is to ignore principles that are as much a part of advanced statistics as anything on this site.

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  5. TonyPenaforHOF says:

    Another great day to be a Pirate fan – we are higher than 28th!!!!!!!!!!

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  6. Temo says:

    I actually liked the Nat’s ballpark. It’s nothing special, but it has a nice quaint feeling to it, almost like a minor league park (except with better amenities). The infamous “moving art” statues are a joke, but everything else I liked. And best of all: it’s cheap.

    I have no idea what you’re talking about when it comes to the sight lines. Everywhere I went (it was empty enough to go touring around the park), there was a decent view of the field, and it was far more efficient in that manner than some of the fancier stadiums (looking at you, Citi Field).

    In fact, I enjoyed going there much more than I did Citi , which emptied my wallet and delivered nothing that enhanced my enjoyment of the game.

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    • Big Oil says:

      Gotta agree here. I’ve sat all over the stadium, and while the value of some seats isn’t worth it relative to others in light of the field product, it is very enjoyable to grab a cheap ticket and hang out on the Red Porch or the tiered bar area in CF. You rarely have to walk up to get to your seats, and when you do, there is almost always an escalator ready to take you there. The staff is generally friendly (and not just in the Diamond Level) and accommodate, in some instances, more than they are supposed to.

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      • Temo says:

        That’s a good point about the staff. It’s probably due to a supply/demand situation where the supply of Nats baseball far outweighs the demand, but certainly the difference in how the Nats treat fans is light years from what the Redskins do.

        And the fans themselves were lovely. I’m a Braves fan living in NJ, so I’ve been to Philly games, Mets games, and Nats games, and going to the Nats games was probably the best experience of the bunch.

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      • JR says:

        That is, if the escalator is working.

        I haven’t been in the Red Porch, but I’ve sat most other places high and low (whatever free tickets were around at work), and the seats are oriented straight ahead, not toward the center of the field. It’s a minor thing, but something you notice down the lines in the upper tiers.

        Concessions are also ridiculously expensive, basically NY prices, and until the beer garden opened up, there was really no alternative to eating or drinking in the area. If concessions were in line with Baltimore’s prices, which are 20-30% lower for beer and food, the stadium would be a lot better.

        It’s insulting that the stadium was so expensive, and so much of the interior is just cinder blocks painted green.

        Frankly, I liked the gritty feel and friendliness of the staff at RFK better. It smelled like pee, but they didn’t really care what you did.

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      • Big Oil says:

        JR: I can’t disagree with the pricing. As far as the escalator goes, on the 15-20 times I attended last year, it seemed to be working fine every time. That being said, it isn’t necessary to get to the Porch via escalator if you enter the left field gate.

        If you consider that the supposed development around the stadium has not at all taken hold, I think it’s fair to conclude that the park maintains the environment pretty well. The idea was for it to be the hub of a re-vitalization area like the Phone Booth was. However, unlike when MCI was built, the economy (specifically real estate) wasn’t in the toilet (IIRC). So, while ruining the view of the Capitol was a bad move, I don’t think the stadium has been given the sort of environment that helps to define the totality of a ballpark’s evaluation as a result of circumstances beyond (to some degree) the control of those in charge.

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  7. Temo says:

    And as far as Nats fans go, they’re very visibly unknowledgeable and definitely qualify almost as baseball newbies (last time I was there, I was convincing the guy sitting next to me that Adam Dunn was a horrific fielder, as if we couldn’t see that fact plainly in front of us, as we were sitting behind him in left field).

    But that’s to be expected. I wouldn’t say that most of DC are orioles fans, they seem to mostly be apathetic to baseball in general. It’s a Redskin town first and foremost, after all. That said, they can definitely acquire an audience due to the huge baseball population just south of DC in northern Virginia. Most of that population are actually Braves fans, if they’re interested in pro baseball at all, but a few winning seasons can convert most of those fans from either College/high school baseball or from the Braves (since TBS no longer broadcasts daily Braves games there).

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  8. Keith says:

    Two Points:

    1. With regard to the post, as JR has noted, attendance is down and the front office clearly was thinking about the quality of play on the field this year — not in the future — when they signed Rodriguez, Kennedy and Marquis. They can’t afford to lose any more fans by creating the impression that they are getting worse, not better. Time will tell if it works.

    2. With regard to JR’s comment, to say that the stadium is “far away from the people who actually go the (sic) games” is an insult to the 600,000 of us who live in the District of Columbia. Sorry, pal, but stadiums are returning to the cities. If you and your neighbors in the Montgomery County ‘burbs want to drive to Baltimore to watch Angelos & Co, enjoy the game. For me, I will always prefer to jump on the red line to watch my hometown team, win or lose.

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    • JR says:

      No apologies necessary, pal, for stadiums returning to cities. But, good luck sustaining attendance over an 81 game schedule with 600,000 people, few of whom have been interested in going to the games since the team relocated.

      Also, I didn’t mean literally far away. The stadium was six miles from my apartment. However, it takes 45 minutes to get there via the metro. For the first (or last) five stops, you’re crammed into a Green line car that wasn’t built to support the volume.

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  9. Nick says:

    DC isn’t a typical town in America. A large percentage of people who currently live in DC are there representing one of the 435 congressional districts across this country, or they work for one of the 100 Senators, or they work from the administration. Also, baseball is a relatively new phenomenon in our nation’s capitol. An awful team run by MLB hasn’t had an opportunity to establish real roots and a devoted fan base.

    I agree the stadium is underwhelming, but it is a key piece in an effort to revitalize an area of the city in desperate need of revitalization. Baseball will do well in Washignton, but only whern they begin to put a product on the field instead of a few good players. Zimmerman and Strasburg are a start…they need a lot more….

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    • don says:

      And a lot of the ones who aren’t directly involved with the administration are still transplants working for beltway bandit companies. Someone who grew up in North Jersey watching the Yankees and moved to DC for a consulting gig isn’t going to all the sudden become a Nats fan, but they may go to games if the park is nice.

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  10. Will says:

    Dave, I don’t see the problem with signing guys like Pudge, Marquis and Kennedy. Perhaps you can criticize over-paying Pudge and giving him a second year, but beyond that these guys don’t take away whatsoever from the rebuilding process.

    Marquis, Pudge, Kennedy and Capps all filled desperately needed holes in the roster. Marquis- an innings eater, Pudge- a veteran catcher to play full-time while Flores recovers, Kennedy- a good defensive 2B and Capps- a major league reliever (seriously, you’d be hard pressed finding a single guy in the bullpen last year who would have made another team’s roster).

    If anything, these signings would ADVANCE the rebuilding process. Like last year, they dealt Joe Beimel for prospects, I don’t see why they wouldn’t do the same this year. What’s half a season of Adam Kennedy’s $1.5m contract, if they can get a prospect or two from a team in need of a 2B at the deadline.

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  11. Omar says:

    Dave, two questions:

    Who are decent candidates to acquire guys like Willingham and Dunn? They’re both probably best suited to DH. The team that strikes me in the AL as needing a DH would mainly be The Angels. Sure guys like Dunn and Willingham can help out the Mariners (who have Bradley and Jr.), the Rangers (who have Vlad), the Yankees (who have Johnson), the Red Sox (who have Ortiz and Lowell), and the White Sox (who seem to be hell bent on acquiring mediocre players)…but it seems that most of the AL Playoff contenders are spoken for, with the exception maybe the Rays…who have the obstacle of Pat Burrell’s contract and a shitty budget. While I agree with you, that they are the perfect players that should be traded…but it seems that the DH market has collapsed. Now, Dunn can play first base, but there’s a wealth of excellent first basemen amongst AL competitors (Morneau, Teixeira, Youkilis, and Morales) and he doesn’t really fit the Mariners mold. Willingham, is also a poor defender in left, who is better suited to DH as well. So if they should trade the two, what should the package be? While both players are good, there’s the reality that they really don’t have a fit for a team who should be looking to acquire talent nearing free agency.

    Also, what makes the Nationals, and Padres for that matter, better than the Pirates?

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    • Newcomer says:

      I’d say it is likely the White Sox will acquire a DH mid-season. There have been rumblings of interest in Adrian Gonzalez, though I think that’s doubtful. Kenny is giving Ozzie his chance with this DH-by-committee idea, but he is ready to pull the trigger when it fails. Asst. GM Rick Hahn made the following comments to bloggers the other day:

      “If this does not work … I think you can rest assured we are going to do everything in our power to correct it.

      “There’s already a list in place, the are already conversations that have taken place, as it does with any potential foible in a roster construction. There is always a contingency plan and this is no exception.”

      (http://soxmachine.com/soxmachine/2010/03/12/front-office-talk-occasionally-about-baseball/#more-1507)

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    • Reuben says:

      Do you mean worse than the pirates?

      The order so far,
      Houston Astros
      Kansas City Royals
      Washington Nationals
      San Diego Padres

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  12. Simon says:

    DC itself is only a small part of the greater Washington Metro area. It’s centrally located but the Nats don’t need to make urban fans their main target market. The largest part of this market is Northern Virginia (where I live and where there are no big numbers of Braves fans and never have been).

    The Washington market is quite separate from Baltimore. Even before the Nats arrived, you were more likely to meet a Red Sox or Yankees fan than an Orioles fan. It’s a bit different the farther north into Maryland you go, where the two regions overlap. But this isn’t a two team market the way SF, LA, Chi, or NY are. DC metro is a top ten market on its own, and the Nats are the only team in town. Put a decent product on the field and they’ll be fine.

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    • Temo says:

      Well, my point was that of the few pro baseball fans in Northern Virginia, it was predominantly Braves fans, due to the well documented influence of TBS broadcasting in areas without pro baseball teams.

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  13. Sasskuash says:

    I have to disagree with the statement that the ownership is “willing to spend some money.” I think they are cheap, and occasionally will throw an offer out to try and stem the perception that they are cheap.

    I’ll use last season’s draft as an example: Yes, they signed Strasburg and spent big money to get him. That was important for the franchise, and a great move. It’s also the closest thing you will find to a blue-chip stock: a pitcher who is MLB ready with little development time, has the stuff to someday dominate, and the hype to sell out a stadium for the entirety of his first season. After that, they went cheap. Storen looks like a great reliever, but at the 10th overall pick in the draft, he was selected way too high and there were definitely better players on the board. They picked Storen because he was willing to sign WAY under slot immediately. They then went on to over-draft most of the rest of their picks. Kobernus would likely have been there in the 3rd round, but they drafted him in the 2nd. Trevor Holder was drafted within the first 5 rounds (I think 3rd but I forget exactly where it was) when most scouting reports said he wouldn’t be drafted until somewhere between rounds 7-10. All of these picks were made because they could be signed under slot and easily. So ownership wanted it’s one shiny piece, and then doesn’t want to back it up with the kind of talent that can give a franchise real depth in the minor league system.

    This is how the Lerners operate the team: Throw a token contract out there, but don’t spend money on the depth that can really take the franchise to the next level. I’m not talking about spending for free agents. I want them to be more aggressive in the draft, show a willingness to sign above-slot, and start making a serious effort to find international talent. They need to develop a lot more minor-league depth. I feel like we’ll be having the exact same conversation about the Nats 5 years froms now, but I hope I’m wrong.

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  14. Chris says:

    I agree with the article 100%. Washington should continue stockpiling young talent, and using their older, more established players as trade bait to continue building their system. By doing this, they can hope to have a team that is ready for contention in the next 2-3 years. Dunn & Willingham are definitely expendable, and should be used as strategy to trade for young talent, even if they are not major league ready.

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  15. John says:

    I’ve been to ballparks all around the country, and I really enjoy the stadium. It is definitely one of the nicer parks I have been too. I really like how it has an “open feel”. While it doesn’t have that defining personality, I don’t get how anyone can complain about the site lines. Ive sat all over and never had a bad seat or trouble seeing the action.

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  16. David says:

    I live in Northern Virginia and grew up in New England. The only time I ever go to Baltimore is to see the Red Sox. For a 7:30 game, I have to leave my Arlington office by 4:30, and I’m as close to Baltimore as you can get within Northern VA.

    Meanwhile, to get to Nats Park, I stumble onto the Metro and I’m there in 20 minutes, and the neighborhood around the stadium is picking up.

    That said, the Nats organization is a complete embarrassment, the owners are far more concerned about squeezing nickels than winning. They use their PR front Stan Kasten to justify their actions. And the reason they sign so many aging players is because they can get them on short-term contracts. Dunn and Marquis are here for one reason – they both signed two year deals. When they’re gone they’ll be other 31 and 32 year olds coming in for the same amount of time. Even worse, there’s no intelligence in the scouting department that comes close to what the Marlins do. Strasburg and ZImmerman are great, but this org has no ability to pull out a diamond in a rough the way the Marlins turn 4th rounders like Josh Johnson and Cody Ross into solid, everyday players. So Incompetence + lack of money = many years of losing.

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  19. Dion Touton says:

    Hello People! Just wanted to tell you that I got tickets to the Jersey Boys concert on May 29th. In this site you can find tickets for other dates too. It’s amazing their performance on stage, this is my second time and I’m still so excited about listening them live! On this page you can see the section where you’re buying the ticket, so it’s very recommended!

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