Projecting Matt Garza at Wrigley Field

The addition of Matt Garza to the Cubs rotation looks like an upgrade in a vacuum. On the surface, Garza appears to be a decent pitcher, holding a sub-4.00 ERA with a healthy 200+ innings each of the past two seasons. A young pitcher heading into his prime years, Garza does sport a varied pitch repertoire while relying mostly on his mid-90s four-seam fastball. Yet, though Garza may be a staple in the Cubs rotation and more reliable than the enigmatic Carlos Silva, he is anything but a potential ace in a rotation absent of aces.

As Dave Cameron explained, Garza’s approach in relying heavily on four-seam fastballs comes at the risk of surrendering home runs, and his relatively low home-run to fly-ball ratio for a fly-ball pitcher is one factor for his sub-4.00 ERA seasons. What I am concerned about is what I feel some optimistic Cubs fans (yes, they exist) are ignoring: Garza’s fly-ball tendencies are ill-suited for Wrigley Field, and his Tropicana-depressed HR/FB ratio will be exposed in 2011.

Take a look at Garza’s batted-ball home/away splits the past three seasons:

Garza 2009 Home: 0.87 HR/9, 40.8% GB%, 41.8% FB%, 8.5% HR/FB
Garza 2009 Away: 1.42 HR/9, 38.4% GB%, 43.3% FB%, 12.3% HR/FB
Garza 2010 Home: 1.04 HR/9, 30.4% GB%, 47.3% FB%, 8.5% HR/FB
Garza 2010 Away: 1.40 HR/9, 39.9% GB%, 42.8% FB%, 11.3% HR/FB

I see two concerning trends here. First, Garza is becoming more and more of a fly-ball pitcher, having increased his FB% and decreased his GB% every season since 2007 with the Twins. This may have been an intentional adjustment by the Rays’ pitching staff to exploit Tropicana’s deep center and minimize skidding ground balls over FieldTurf (and if so, it was a smart move). Such a strategy will not work at Wrigley Field.

Second, though Garza has become less of a fly-ball pitcher on the road, he has a much higher home-run rate as well as a hazardous HR/FB ratio. If road pitching numbers are more indicative than that of outings at Tropicana Field, Cubs fans in the bleachers should expect long balls from the pitcher who allowed 28 home runs in 2010, third among AL starters.

If that doesn’t convince you, take a look at the following diagram taking Garza’s batted balls at Tropicana Field in 2010 mapped on to Wrigley Field:

Feel free to click on the image to enlarge it while comparing to the same plot over Tropicana Field. The image above shows that a couple of fly outs and doubles toward center field would have potentially gone out of the park. Important note: these plots are taken from Gameday hit-location data, which track where the ball was fielded and not where the ball initially landed. But even if we eliminate the singles and doubles, several fly outs that occurred in straight away center (engulfed by Tropicana’s deep territory) would have hit Wrigley’s warning track. And every baseball fan who has been to Wrigley Field knows that it exhibits unusual wind patterns, especially when the wind blows out and toward Lake Michigan. You can connect the rest of the dots from there.

What this spells out is that Garza must diminish his fly-ball tendencies that worked at Tropicana Field in order to prevent a spike in home runs allowed at Wrigley. Garza has the secondary pitches to complement his four-seam fastball, but may have to develop a strong out-pitch in order to get more batters to whiff. The power hitters of the NL Central division would be well-advised to expect high heat and swing away if the Cubs don’t adjust Garza’s approach. The ubiquitous (FanGraphs author!) Jonah Keri also adds that Garza’s extreme fly-ball trends benefited from the Rays’ outfield defense, which the Cubs’ outfield falls very short of.

Garza is the odd one out in a starting rotation filled with sinkerballers and ground-ball pitchers such as Ryan Dempster and Carlos Zambrano. And just as the Cubs need to field a better infield defense behind the rest of the rotation, Garza has to produce alternative batted-ball tendencies.

As a final nail-in-the-coffin argument, take a look at the tendencies of two similar starting pitchers:

Garza ’10: 6.60 K/9, 2.77 BB/9, 1.23 HR/9, 44.7% FB%, 10.0% HR/FB, 4.51 xFIP
Pitcher A: 5.22 K/9, 2.52 BB/9, 1.67 HR/9, 41.0% FB%, 13.3% HR/FB, 4.70 xFIP
Pitcher B: 6.23 K/9, 3.07 BB/9, 1.42 HR/9, 41.2% FB%, 11.6% HR/FB, 4.66 xFIP

Relatively similar numbers for the most part, no? Except that homer-happy Pitchers A and B are Rodrigo Lopez and Kevin Millwood, members of the 5.00 ERA club still toiling in the free agent market looking for work. Don’t be fooled by Garza’s deceptive ERA numbers. If Garza’s batted-ball splits remain the same during the 2011 season, expect to see his overall home-run rate increase closer to his away splits, which are dangerously close to Lopez and Millwood territory.

(h/t to this awesome MLB Gameday BIP Location tool for mapping batted balls on top of any ballpark)




Print This Post



Albert Lyu (@thinkbluecrew, LinkedIn) is a graduate student at the Georgia Institute of Technology, but will always root for his beloved Northwestern Wildcats. Feel free to email him with any comments or suggestions.

56 Responses to “Projecting Matt Garza at Wrigley Field”

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
  1. phoenix2042 says:

    his Ks might improve from being in the NL, especially when they have weaker lineups (more top heavy at least) in the NL central than the AL east. basically, a spike in strikeouts might make up for the increased homers, especially now that he gets to face a pitcher 2-3 times per start.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  2. ChicagoStyle says:

    Seems to me that in the past 5-6 years, flyball pitchers who have jumped from Pitcher’s parks in the AL to Hitter’s parks in the NL have done just fine. Didn’t FanGraphs basically do this write up for Ted Lilly, Edwin Jackson and Joe Blanton when they headed to the NL?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Ted Lilly went from a solid home run park to a neutral park and Edwin Jackson did awful in the NL last year.

      Joe Blanton may be the best example you give, but he doesn’t prove what you want. His K/9 went from 5.09 in the AL to 7.06, but his FIP went from 4.15 to 4.54.

      Even if his K/9 goes up and his BB/9 goes down he’s going to give up enough homers to make that change neutral at best.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  3. highrent says:

    echoes what I feel about garza. I think he’s a solid above average pitcher but he will need to make adjustments and unless he makes some pretty profound ones this notion that he will suddenly thrive in Wrigley is pretty mucha myth and he’s more likely to struggle there as he tries to deal with higher homerun rates.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  4. Chicago Mark says:

    Sorry Albert but I’m not buying the Lopez and Millwood comparisons at all. Do you really think he’s closer to their abilities than say Lilly or Blanton? And isn’t he still in his prime? There has to be something to say about Garza’s move from the AL East to the NL Central and pitching to the opposing pitcher 2-3 times per game. As a Cub fan (and losing more faith every year), I still have to believe he’ll do better against the Pirates and Astros rather than the lowly Jays and O’s. That’s still not comparing the Yanks and Sox to the Reds, Brewers and Cards. I’ll buy a better Garza in 2011….. and a forth or fifth place finish!!!

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Statement says:

      “rather than the lowly Jays”…

      That’s probably sarcasm, but as a (growing increasingly impatient) Jays, fan I have to point out that they had 85 wins last year in the AL East. That’s a playoff team in any other division.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Theo says:

        Oh, those lowly Jays… Imagine something crazy, like them leading the league in home runs! By like, 50! How crazy would that be?

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • CJ says:

      Hey, small sample size and all, but Garza is 0-2 versus the Astros in his career.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Albert Lyu says:

      Didn’t say that they were closer. Garza’s results are actually similar to 2010 Lopez and 2010 Millwood besides two big exceptions: home run rate and ERA. What I am saying is that it is quite possible that Garza allows 30+ home runs pitching half of his starts at Wrigley, and if that happens, you might see a better comparison 9-10 months from now.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  5. Chicago Mark says:

    EXACTLY Statement!!!!

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  6. Jeff S says:

    The wind blows in at Wrgley way more than it blows out, so giving up flyballs is not the issue at Wrigley – it’s walking batters. Garza will do just fine and better than expected. You must not be from Chicago or visited Wrigley much

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Albert Lyu says:

      I do live in Chicago, and have been to over a dozen games in the past four years. Maybe that’s not enough, but I did find that 14 games in 2010 had the wind blowing out away from CF and 12 games in and toward CF. It also blows in LF and RF more often than out LF and RF, so I’ll give you that. For Garza’s case, let’s hope the Cubs hire some really good meteorologists to schedule his starts.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • evo34 says:

      It is true that the wind blows in much more frequently at Wrigley, but…the effect is not symmetric. I.e., a strong wind out is much more damaging to a pitcher’s HR rate than a strong wind in is beneficial. That is, a pitcher has more just-short flyball outs in an avg. game than he allows just-enough HRs.

      The net effect is that Garza’s HR rate is likely to be adversely affected by Wrigley, but the volatility of his HRs allowed will be much higher. I.e., he is likely to get destroyed in 2-3 home outings, which is common for Cubs pitchers.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  7. Goose says:

    I am tired of reading about Matt Garza’s increasing flyball%. If you are going to write this article, don’t you have to mention the fact that Ted Lilly’s numbers from when he signed with Chicago before 2007 thru 2010 were better in Chicago than on the road?

    Wrigley – 372 IP, 3.60 ERA, 56 HRA
    Non-Wrigley – 410.1 IP, 3.75 ERA, 59 HRA

    So, Ted Lilly (last 4 yr FB% – 49.1, 44.5, 50.6, 52.6), a more extreme of a flyball pitcher than Garza, succeeded in Chicago, so it ispossible. People are just looking for a reason to not like the move by the Cubs…

    Final thought, based on accepted xBABIP calculations, only 15% of flyballs put in play land for hits…I’ll admit that the Chicago outfield may give away a few extra hits, but let’s not get crazy.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Chris in Hawaii says:

      I’d agree and add that way too much emphasis is put on fly ball % as compared to line drive %. Line drive % is gonna tell you how easy it is for opponents to square up against a guy and make solid contact.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Theo says:

      Yeah, but look at the SLG% for fly balls. Not many extra hits have to start falling in for things to get ugly.

      Of course, BABiP doesn’t account for homers, either, which almost all come from fly balls.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Albert Lyu says:

      Ted Lilly also has a much better strikeout rate than Garza. I didn’t say that fly ball pitchers can’t succeed — it’s just Garza doesn’t get enough to whiff to compensate for all the fly balls he gives up.

      Lilly:
      2007: 7.57 K/9, 1.22 HR/9, 3.83 ERA, 4.31 xFIP
      2008: 8.09 K/9, 1.41 HR/9, 4.09 ERA, 4.14 xFIP
      2009: 7.58 K/9, 1.12 HR/9, 3.10 ERA, 3.98 xFIP

      Believe me, if I felt that Lilly was a good comparison to Garza, this article would be a lot different.

      The Cubs paid a premium for a pretty great risk.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Paul says:

        You’re picking and choosing your stats. Average Garza’s SO rate over the past three years and it’s about .5 per game less than Lilly’s. And one of them faced a pitcher around 2.5 times per game.

        How on earth can all this FG analysis not adjust peripherals (not to mention HR rate) for facing a pitcher rather than a DH?

        I really hope the guys in my league are buying this crap, because I will gladly “overpay” for him.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • evo34 says:

        Agree with Paul here… Let’s do very basic AL/NL adjustments for K rates here before jumping to the conclusion that Lilly better strikeout skills than Garza. Further, if you apply even rough opponent adjustments (it’s well-documented that the AL East is the toughest div to pitch in, and the NL Cent is one of the easiest), it’s not at all clear that Lilly is even marginally better than Garza at K skill, much less in a whole different category…

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  8. Jeffrey Gross says:

    Albert,

    Translating Matt Garza’s 2008-10 from AL to NL, Tropicana to Wrigley, keeping the 592.1 IP constant:
    504.8 K,
    196.8 BB,
    98.7 HR (adjusted to 11.5% HR/FB% and half of Wrigley’s 10% HR/FB index)

    Bottom Line: 4.67 xFIP

    But hey! If Matt Cain can do it…

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  9. Bobby A says:

    The wind really does play a huge part in costing/saving HR’s for pitchers. A lot will depend on whether he gets cold weather (northern winds, blowing in) vs warmer weather (southern winds, blowing out). Wind can often go from left to right, or right to left, at Wrigley, but the cold/warm element of the in/out jet stream rings true.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  10. Chicago Mark says:

    Are you buying Alberts’ arguement Jeffrey? Has FG or anybody else done analysis on moving from the AL to NL? What about AL East to NL? Do you really think Garza morphs into Millwood or Lopez? Just for sh!%$ and giggles I did a quick calculation. AL East 2010 = 4.74runs/game……
    NL Central (less Cubs) = 4.28runs/game…..
    How many more home runs are you projecting against Garza? 10? 15? How many runs does that equate to?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  11. Jon Williams says:

    A good number of Garza’s flyballs are also of the infield variety.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  12. John says:

    Hardball Times’ HR/FB factors reveals that Tropicana Field boosted HR/FB by 11% over a 4-year sample. Wrigley, on the other hand, boosted HR/FB by just 3%. In ’10, Garza yielded about 1.4 fly balls per inning pitched. Extrapolating that over 200 innings and assuming an even split, Garza should allow about 140 fly balls at Wrigley and 140 fly balls on the road. Using his HR/FB rates from ’10 and adjusting for Wrigley (11.3% away and 8% at home), I’d project Garza to allow 27 HR’s in ’11, or one fewer than he allowed last season.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • John says:

      What I don’t like about this post is how Albert doesn’t mention HR/FB factors for the respective ballparks. Why should we blithely assume that Garza’s 11.3% HR/FB road numbers are more indicative of his baseline? Wrigley suppresses HR/FB relative to Tropicana. That cannot be ignored.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Jeffrey Gross says:

      Josh,

      I think you are looking at the wrong data. I have the THT Data file in front of me:
      06-09 HR/FB for Tropicana: 0.99998957
      06-09 HR/FB for Wrigley: 1.10395036

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  13. CircleChange11 says:

    In the other thread where Garza and Wrigley were discussed, the left-center alley was exactly what I was thnking of.

    Of course, in Wrigley, there are about 15 BIP on Garza’s diagram that are going to be determind by whether the wind is blowing in or out.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  14. Chicago Mark says:

    I’m enjoying this allot Albert and Jeffrey. I really like FG. BUT GIVE THIS CUB FAN SOME LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL!!!
    I see his k rate going up and his home run rate going up minimally (over under at 5 and I take the under). Again no AL East + pitcher hitting 2/3 times = better pitching environment. And as a long suffering Cub fan who has seen very little in player developement (keeping my fingers crossed on Castro and the lefty) I don’t mind them trading prospects for an <4 era/200ip experienced pitcher.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Jeffrey Gross says:

      The change in league offset is not enough. I was going to do a thorough write up on Garza — in fact, I was starting one for THT when I stumbled across Albert’s article — but in light of this article, the only thing I have to add is the converted K, BB, xFIP data.

      AL>NL moves = +0.57 K/9, -0.05 BB/9. There is also a general HR/FB change, but that can be done more scientifically with park-by-park factors in my honest opinion.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Chicago Mark says:

        Thank for the link Jeffrey. I’ll simply put the over/under on his era at 3.80 and take the under. So I’m saying <3.80 era with 7+ k/9 and 29 home runs allowed. That is if the 27 I read earlier is correct. Give me your projections. Maybe I should be more aggressive. But aren't we predictors conservitive? Ha, Ha, I actually called myself a predictor. Prognosticator!!!???
        Thanks guys. I must have asked some pretty good questions for you to direct your responses at me.
        GO CUBS!!!

        Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Dan says:

        If you do an article about it, maybe you could look at the differences of playing a ton of road games at Cincy, Houston, Pit, Mil, St. Louis vs. NYY, Bos, Balt, Tor. I would think it would all wash out as being similar, but you never know. Maybe Garza will save some road HR’s now in the NL Central and flip around some of Garza’s home/road split lines. Might be worse though too.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Daniel says:

      Geovany Soto, man. Developed him right into one of the best catchers in the game. Geo not hitting 8th and Koyie Hill not playing 60 games is all the light I’m asking for this year.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Chicago Mark says:

        Thanks Daniel, I’m still buying Garza over the Cubs ability to develope prospects. And the Cubs just might surprise us this year. But after about 50 years I’m just not buying. Keep the expectations low and be happy when they’re exceeded. But that hasn’t happened in over 100 years.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  15. West says:

    A lot of those Out dots in LF will cease to exist this season.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Daniel says:

      You know, I thin things have come circle on Soriano to the extent that he’s now underrated. I know he’s infuriating to watch some times but he’s really not that bad in left. The contract’s still terrible, yada yada yada, but a lot of the perception of him now is based on that one terrible 2009 season. He was ok last year, not worth the money but not a disaster either.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  16. I think Garza will benefit from moving out of the AL East, enough that it will largely cancel out a bump he’ll receive from being in an environment that doesn’t cater to his skills nearly as well as Tampa did.

    Also, the BIP tool is sweet. There goes my productivity for the weekend.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  17. Marver says:

    I don’t buy any of this, really. Sure, if Garza stayed on the same team and faced the same hitters as last season, but played his home games in Wrigley, then he would have given up more homeruns. I can buy that.

    What I can’t buy is that going to the NL where you face a much more certain out than a designated hitter won’t necessarily bring down his per-nine numbers. If his odds of getting a hitter out increase, it’ll be easier for him to accumulate the requisite innings to drown out any potential increase in homeruns allowed to premium hitters.

    And, finally, you can’t possibly make an argument that facing the NL Central’s worth of hitters won’t make a HUGE difference; hell, he faced the league leaders in homeruns to go along with the Yankees and Red Sox in 13 — THIRTEEN!!! — of his starts last season.

    I’m not saying that the Cubs didn’t possibly overpay for Garza, but I am saying this article could be detrimental to the average reader.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  18. DrBGiantsfan says:

    Here’s what I think is missing from this: I don’t know if Pitchfx data can differentiate between a fastball and a hanging breaking pitch, but I would bet that most of Garza’s HR’s Allowed come off the latter. What a good 4 seam fastball gives you, if you can work with it up in the strike zone, is a lot of weak flyballs, IF pops or shallow high flies. They are easy outs, do not allow baserunners to advance and have no chance of carrying out of the park.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  19. greg says:

    I wonder if this cyborg you speak of, Matt Garza, will be able to reach self-awareness and exert free-will. Will he be able to observe the flags blowing straight out and make an adjustment during games in the hot summer months of June, July, and August? Maybe he will become autonomous and write a program to throw sliders on the outer-third in 2-0 and 2-1 counts. And what’s the score again? Does it matter? Like most RHPs he is probably only concerned with his statistics, primarily, his HR/9 and K/9, so more fantasy baseball players will draft him higher.

    It will be difficult for this bionic youngster, he is only equipped with a 96mph FB and a wipeout slider. What were the Cubs thinking? Did they not learn their lesson from the Ted Lilly experiment?

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  20. Eric Cioe says:

    If he starts to pitch lower in the zone, he likely starts to strike out fewer batters. I can’t find whiff rates for specific pitches right now, but my guess is that his fastball gets more whiffs over league average than his slider gets over the league average slider. In other words, his fastball is his best option to get whiffs, and it’s much easier to get whiffs the higher you go in the zone.

    There is also the idea that guys who throw a curveball with some regularity have to work up in the zone a bit more with their heater in order to mask the hump in the curve. Someone at THT did an article on this a while back, I think focusing on Ted Lilly. And while Garza’s 76 mph curve is a far cry from Lilly’s big dumb high school curve, I think the idea stands.

    I think that xFIP regressions are dumb for lots of pitchers. Some guys seem to outpeform it year after year. There might be some sort of correlation between HR/FB and fastball velocity or something.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Theo says:

      Last year, he had a wFB of 11.8, and a wSL of 1.4, so yes, his fastball is much, much better than his slider. Both his change and curve were rated negatively, so yes, his true weapon is his fastball.

      Vote -1 Vote +1

      • Eric Cioe says:

        I don’t like the pitch weights here because they are BABIP dependent. I’d be a lot more interested in looking at the whiff rates of his fastball and his slider compared to a league average fastball and slider.

        Vote -1 Vote +1

  21. Kampfer says:

    I do not agree with the calculation of HR/FB ratio when switching leagues. I think a more indicative stat to use is the league average HR/FB ratio(less the home team for the player) instead of the park factor when you have to consider moving from freakin’ AL East to a NL Central. Seriously, this Matt Garza boy had to face the strongest lineups of all of baseball — R.Sox, Yanks, Jays. These teams don’t just score by getting on bases — they slugged the hell of the baseball by sending flyballs over the fences at 13.6(Jays), 12.1(Yanks),10.8(Red Sox) %. The NL Central? The Reds led the pack with 11.3% HR/FB. Cardinals(9.4%) Pirates(8.3%) Astros(7.0%). The Os had a 8.1% HR/FB last year, and was still better than the Astros. I think Matt Garza homerun problem is actually being relieved switching from AL EAST to NL Central. And btw, I just realized how unfortunate it is to pitch for the Os…

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  22. MM says:

    Cliffs of the article and discussion:

    We don’t know.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  23. Scott says:

    Nice take, but the premise of your article is based on data that you admit to be flawed, and on the assumption that the wind is always blowing out at Wrigley. In April and May, Wrigley can play very strongly to the pitcher as any wind off the lake (the predominant pattern April – June), knocks down flyballs regularly.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  24. Dann M says:

    I’d suggest heading over to B-R (for the easy-sum multiple years) and checking out Ted Lilly’s three years as a Blue Jay, and then looking at his 4 years in the NL [3.5+ in Chicago]. As I was looking over at the Gorzo trade, I looked up both guys’ numbers and found the jump Lilly made to be really interesting.

    First, a Cliffs Notes of Garza’s 3 years in TBA:
    94 GS, 592.1 IP, 1.251 WHIP, 8.2 H/9, 1.1 HR/9, 3.1 BB/9, 7.1 K/9, 2.32 K/BB

    Now, Ted Lilly’s 3 years in TOR:
    89 GS, 505.1 IP, 1.411 WHIP, 8.6 H/9, 1.4 HR/9, 4.1 BB/9, 7.6 K/9, 1.86 K/BB

    And Lilly’s first 3 years with the CHC:
    95 GS, 588.2 IP, 1.145 WHIP, 7.9 H/9, 1.3 HR/9, 2.4 BB/9, 7.8 K/9, 3.28 K/BB

    So neither HR or K really changed all that much for Lilly. His hits dropped by a meaningful amount. But the real change was simply cutting his walks by 40%. That’s what matters, I think. He became a much more pronounced fly ball pitcher after switching leagues, also. Sure, they couldn’t be more polar opposite in what they are as pitchers. But Lilly’s raw numbers and actual history provide a meaningful comparison.

    What the numbers from the past three years tell me about Garza is that his ability to strike people out is tied heavily to the effectiveness of his breaking pitches. But at the same time, breaking pitches tend to increase walks when the control isn’t there. From 2009 to 2010, Garza’s WHIP and his K/BB stayed more or less constant, but his K/9 and BB/9 both dropped heavily – just at the same rate.

    Let’s wait and see what happens. I’ll put money down now that Dempster, not Garza, leads the staff in homers allowed in 2011.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • evo34 says:

      Should be noted that Toronto has always had one of the most HR-friendly parks in the majors. So comparing HR rates moving from TB to ChC and moving from Tor to Chc is not apples to apples..

      Vote -1 Vote +1

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current day month ye@r *