The Jayson Werth Problem

Now that the Phillies 2010 season is over, the focus in Philadelphia shifts to the big question of the winter – is Jayson Werth going to leave, and if so, how do they replace him? The prevailing assumption has been that the Phillies have no chance at re-signing him, given their $144 million in committed salaries for 2011, but Ruben Amaro recently stated that the Phillies had enough money to sign him “depending on what the ask is”. Of course, he then went on to say this:

“Jayson had a good year. It wasn’t an extraordinary year,” Amaro said. “He had a tough time with men in scoring position. It wasn’t as productive a year as he had in the past. If he is not with us, there are players that we can acquire and or we have in our own organization that can help us be as consistent.”

If that’s not setting your fan base up for Werth to leave, I don’t know what is. And, given that the Phillies probably need Werth more than any other team in baseball, losing him could present a serious problem, despite Amaro’s statements that he can be replaced.

If the Phillies replace Werth with Domonic Brown, which seems to be the expected scenario, they’ll have something like the following line-up.

Jimmy Rollins, SS, Switch
Placido Polanco, 3B, Right
Chase Utley, 2B, Left
Ryan Howard, 1B, Left
Shane Victorino, CF, Switch
Raul Ibanez, LF, Left
Carlos Ruiz, C, Right
Domonic Brown, RF, Left
Pitcher

Maybe they’d shuffle things around a bit, but it would be some version of a line-up that looked something like that. It doesn’t take much effort to see that the lack of right-handed thump would present a legitimate problem.

Managers already were able to bring in situational lefties to attack the middle of the Phillies line-up in high leverage situations, as we saw in the NLCS. Removing Werth from the equation exacerbates the problem, and the Phillies will run into a lot of situations where they are asking Ryan Howard or Raul Ibanez to get a big hit off of a left-handed reliever in a high leverage situation.

Werth provided necessary balance in the middle of the order, even if Amaro didn’t like his performance with men on base this year. If you replace him with Domonic Brown, it will be nearly impossible to find a spot for a quality right-handed bat on that roster. Each position comes with an incumbent that makes upgrading a challenge.

The Phillies best option would probably be to try to move Raul Ibanez in order to free up left field for a right-handed hitter, but with a $12 million salary, the Phillies would have to eat money in order to move him, and the right-handed outfielder market isn’t very good this winter. After Werth, you’re looking at guys like Austin Kearns, Marcus Thames, and Andruw Jones, none of whom are going to motivate Amaro to make that kind of change.

Essentially, the Phillies options seem to boil down to re-signing Jayson Werth or running out a line-up with a large, exploitable flaw next year. For all of the talk about having alternatives, I’m not sure I see a reasonable one. If the Phillies really do have enough money to keep Werth, they almost have to do it. Losing him would be a real problem, and one that would not have an easy solution.




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Dave is a co-founder of USSMariner.com and contributes to the Wall Street Journal.


104 Responses to “The Jayson Werth Problem”

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  1. NEPP says:

    Here’s the rub: The Phillies cant afford to sign another player over the age of 30 to a long-term deal. Even if they take the one-year hit in payroll in 2011, Werth is likely on the decline. If you give him a 4-5 year deal, you’re gonna regret it in the final couple years of the contract.

    Also, Werth wasn’t all that great against LHP this year either as he posted a reverse split so they’ve already dealt with that issue of RH power. Odds are they’ll likely try to run out platoons in both LF and RF by acquiring a veteran RH bat via trade or free agency. Its not ideal but then neither is resigning (and likely vastly overpaying) Jayson Werth.

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    • bsally says:

      How do you figure he’s in decline? His last three seasons he’s put up WARs of 5.1, 4.9, and 5.0 and his wOBA this year was higher than the previous two. And even though he was slightly worse against LHP than RHP this year (wOBA of .383 vs .400) he put up wOBAs of .444 and .428 against LHP the previous two years so this year’s number seems a bit flukey.

      I don’t know why he scored so low on defense this year but I wouldn’t be surprised if his hip was a bit of an issue.

      As a Braves fan I would be absolutely thrilled if they somehow managed to pony up enough cash to sign him. And then traded for Ellsbury.

      Make it happen Wren!

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      • NEPP says:

        I said likely a decline from here…as in this was likely a peak career year for him. Most RFs dont get better in their Age 32-35 seasons.

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      • bsally says:

        Ah I see. This may be silly to suggest, but I don’t know how dramatically Werth will be affected by age since he played so sparsely during his 20s. I suppose it all comes down to whether you put more stock in decline being due to age or games played.

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      • NEPP says:

        How much of decline is just normal aging and how much is it for games played…its an interesting debate.

        Giving a guy going into his Age 32 season a long-term deal is a bad idea for the Phillies.

        If they gave him $15 million in 2011 (assumes a backloaded deal to keep them under their payroll ceiling), they’d have about $160 million committed to 17 players next year. That isn’t an option for them.

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      • bsally says:

        Yeah, it’s yet another reason to hate the Ryan Howard extension and the Ibanez deal. I don’t see any way he stays in Philly, I suppose it’s just a question of the impact his loss will be, and as this article suggests I don’t think it’s crazy to surmise that it might be a bigger problem than we can currently measure statistically.

        Given the current contracts on Philly’s books, you’re absolutely right that they have to let him go though. $160 million for 17 players is untenable if you’re not the Yankees.

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      • NEPP says:

        Most definitely. The 3rd year of the Ibanez deal was terrible and the completely unneccessary Howard extension will hamstring them for years.

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  2. NEPP says:

    Something else to note: Ibanez also has a no-trade clause so he’s basically untradeable.

    If they are able to sign a RH bat to a short-term deal (maybe Ordonez) and platoon him in LF with Ibanez and go with Francisco/Brown in RF, it would likely be survivable.

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  3. Mike N says:

    I like Ordonez on a one-year deal to platoon, but he’s probably too expensive.

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    • NEPP says:

      It depends. He might fall into the same trap that Abreu, Matsui and Vlad fell into with making huge demands in money/years early on and then sitting till March. If Amaro is actually patient (a reversal for him as he just loves to set the market and make that big splash) he might just cleanup on a veteran RH bat that is still out there when Pitchers/Catchers report. Ordonez (as a Boras client) seems like one of those guys that might end up having to take a 1 year deal after misreading the market. He’s not a legitimate RF anymore so he’s gonna be limited to LF and DH openings and there aren’t all that many of those jobs available.

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      • vivalajeter says:

        No chance Ordonez settles for a platoon role in the NL. Some team will offer him a DH position, or maybe a desperate team will give him a starting OF role, but he’ll certainly get better offers than platooning with Ibanez.

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      • NEPP says:

        Who? There arent all that many DH spots available. And many of those spots might be filled while he holds out for more money/years.

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      • Adam says:

        I don’t see Ordonez falling into that trap. After Crawford and Werth there aren’t any decent OFs available other than Ordonez. While he may be limited to left field and DH, there are enough opening left that he won’t slip to the Phillies on the cheap. For starters, the Phillies just need to look one spot down in the NL East standings to see a team who could use a right-handed outfielder and has an opening in left field.

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  4. tyler says:

    “He had a tough time with runners in scoring position.” Amaro’s baseball acumen is mildly astounding in its ineptness

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    • philosofool says:

      This is also the sort of bullshit you feed a fan base to manage their expectations without actually believing a word of it. If I were in Amaro’s shoes, I would definitely use something like clutch hitting to prepare people when you were unable to resign him. For whatever dumb reasons, fans hate it when you tell them you don’t have the money to do what they want.

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    • bflaff says:

      He was stating a fact.

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  5. Ted says:

    It may not be the best solution around, but they do have Ben Francisco (yea that other guy in the Cliff Lee trade). They could try a planton of Francisco and Brown or some other combination of trade/platoon with Francisco to get more RHBs in the lineup. Yes, I know Francisco is not a Werth-caliber RHB, but would you rather have Francisco at the plate in the 7th inning against a LHP or Ibanez?

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  6. bsally says:

    I wouldn’t be surprised if the Phillies went out and signed the bane of fangraphs, Jeff Francoeur. He seems like the type of player that Amaro can talk himself into.

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  7. cpebbles says:

    “And, given that the Phillies probably need Werth more than any other team in baseball, losing him could present a serious problem, despite Amaro’s statements that he can be replaced. ”

    This is one of the more ridiculous statements I’ve seen on this site. They have the probable number one prospect in baseball ticketed for RF, and a roughly league-average LF and a good CF. Do you honestly think their handedness issue is a bigger deal than say, the fact that there are like two quality corner outfielders in the entire NL West, Seattle’s inability to find a second outfielder with an OPS approaching .700, or Oakland’s inability to find a first?

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    • bsally says:

      Uh, I think the Phillies have greater aspirations than the A’s and Mariners.

      And I’d say the Phillies’ performance against Javier Lopez, a good but by no means great lefty makes this cause for serious concern.

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      • cpebbles says:

        The Mariners were considered a contender going into this year and will likely consider themselves one again next year. Oakland will, and should, consider themselves a contender. Adding 4 to 5 wins to one of those teams is definitely not less of an impact than adding 3 to the Phillies.

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      • bsally says:

        Oof, the Mariners are coming off a historically inept season and I can’t imagine they will consider themselves contenders next year. I don’t know that Werth is worth 5 wins to the A’s but I think the whole point of this article is that Werth is worth more than his WAR suggests to the Phillies because of the protection he affords the lefties in their lineup.

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    • Jason B says:

      “given that the Phillies probably need Werth more than any other team in baseball”

      I had the same basic thought, pebbles – *is* it a given that the Phils need Werth more than anyone else, with Brown waiting in the wings? Not that Brown is a sure-thing by any means, but it’s not like they are handing the job over to a known quantity who is a non-producer (a Randy Winn or Garrett Anderson if you will).

      If Brown is reasonably productive, go with him. I wouldn’t lose sight of the larger issue (maximizing overall productivity in your lineup, top-to-bottom) to strain at a smaller one (lefty/righty imbalance).

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  8. Phylan says:

    I’m not concerned about right-handed bats in the middle of that order. Look up Chase Utley’s recent and career platoon splits.

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    • Rich says:

      You should be, considering the immortal Javier Lopez just owned that order several times in the NLCS that was just played, not sure if you saw.

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      • Phylan says:

        What’s sample size precious

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      • bsally says:

        I’m not sure how one would track this, but I’d be very interested to see how Utley performs against situational lefties versus starters. He stands so close to the plate that one would think sidearmers would give him a ton of trouble (though he does have one of the quickest swings in baseball).

        Food for thought I suppose.

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      • NEPP says:

        You can look up the split…Utley doesn’t have the greatest 7th-9th inning numbers so, yeah, he doesnt handle situational lefties all that well either.

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      • NEPP says:

        To clarify (as I dont want to get jumped on), Utley hit .223 with a .813 OPS this year in the 7th-9th innings. His overall career numbers are very good (an OPS over .900 in those innings…actually his best split in that area (1-3, 4-6, 7-9)

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    • chuckb says:

      Look up Ryan Howard’s. And I’d be willing to bet that Domonic Brown’s not going to be any lefty killer for a couple of years either.

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  9. Holier says:

    If we’re talking “need the most” in terms of difference in probability making the playoffs in 2011 with vs without Werth, I’d actually say the Phillies are pretty low on the list, given how strong (if not overly lefty-heavy) the rest of their roster should still be if they didnt make any moves. On that (very unscientific) principle alone, I’d say the team closest to their tails, The Braves, could “need Werth more”, given each teams current roster composition.

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    • bsally says:

      Very true, the replacement outfielders on the Braves are definitely all worse than Domonic Brown.

      I could definitely see the Phillies struggling more in close games more however if the middle of their lineup can be largely neutralized by a single pitcher on the other team.

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    • Jason B says:

      As a Jays fan, I will definitely say they “need worth more” also. It doesn’t mention anything about their ability to sign him, payroll constraints, etc etc. On a strictly needs-based criterion (and *only* needs-based), I’d say the Phils are mid-to-low in need of Werth, compared to all the other teams.

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    • Adam says:

      Yes, the Braves need Werth more than the Phillies. Alas, they can’t afford him either.

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  10. NEPP says:

    Overall, the Phillies hit LHP better than RHP this year.

    vs. LHP: .767 OPS
    vs. RHP: .736 OPS

    For what its worth. Mind you, Werth posted a reverse split so they did that in spite of him not because of him.

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  11. cpebbles says:

    BTW, not sure why Javy Lopez is being credited for breaking the backs of the Phillies. Brian Wilson accumulated nearly 4 times the WPA, surpassing Lopez’s total WPA for the series in a single game twice. It’s obviously easier to shore up your ability to hit a situation lefty than it is to improve against dominating closers, but I think way-the-hell too much is being made of this issue here.

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    • Jason B says:

      “not sure why Javy Lopez is being credited for breaking the backs of the Phillies.”

      Very true. Moreover, GM’s *definitely* don’t need to commit to multiyear, 100-million -dollar contracts to satisfy a SSS shortcoming (or perceived shortcoming) that occured in a 5- or 7-game series. Saddling your team with these contracts to players likely to be entering a decline is a great way to make sure your team is not-overly-competitive in about three years, unless you have near-unlimited resources.

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  12. Keith says:

    There are a few trade options that Philly could consider to get a righty bat.

    As a Cubs fan, I would say Marlon Byrd is someone they might like if they can get a third team to take Ibanez. He is cheap and productive, and can play all 3 OF spots. He also hit .357 with a .919 OPS against lefties, so he’d be great to break up the lefties.

    They could stick him 5th in the lineup, allowing for Victorino to stay up near the top behind Rollins, if they prefer him there over Polanco.

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    • Jason B says:

      I’d consider perhaps sticking Rollins in at about 7th in the order. He seems to be falling off a cliff – perpetually walking wounded.

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    • chuckb says:

      Why, exactly, would the Cubs get rid of Byrd?

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      • JamesDaBear says:

        Because they can’t move Alfonso Soriano or Kosuke Fukudome and have to get Tyler Colvin in the lineup and have Brett Jackson rapidly approaching. Byrd was a “bargain” this year, but his contract was backloaded to these next two years and he regressed considerably late in the season. As long as the Cubs continue to whine about being poor, Byrd is a luxury, and they should try to turn him into whatever value they can. If they can put the ~$11 million over the next two years into a 1B, for example, they might only lose 80 games next year… sigh.

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  13. Pat Burrell says:

    “The Phillies best option would probably be to try to move Raul Ibanez in order to free up left field for a right-handed hitter…”

    Hey guys!

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    • NEPP says:

      Lace em up, Pat! You’re now a platoon bat in LF!

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    • ElJimador says:

      Burrell actually would make a lot of sense for the Phillies. I’m sure his preference would be to stay in SF but the Phillies could outbid the Giants w/o having to commit anywhere near the package they would to resign Werth. And if that reduces Ibanez to a high paid PH, well so be it, since he’s not really tradeable with that contract and since that’s probably all he should be at this point anyway.

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  14. Al says:

    Javier Lopez led the NL in LH BA against going into the playoffs. No shame in getting beat by an effective specialist at his specialty.

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    • NEPP says:

      He was also ridiculously hot going into the playoffs. Look at his numbers with the Giants. Small sample size sure but he was on fire with that club.

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      • hk says:

        It would also help to deal with LOOGY’s if the manager would stick to the lineup with a RHB – be it Werth or someone else – batting between Utley and Howard.

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  15. bflaff says:

    To be honest, it seems uncharacteristic for Amaro to baldly state that the Phils have the money to re-sign Werth, especially since everyone has assumed all along that the reason why Werth won’t be returning is because he’s become unaffordable. The fanbase hasn’t exactly struggled with this reality, so Amaro wouldn’t have been slammed for simply admitting it.

    Therefore, it looks like he really does have a bankroll to play with this offseason, contra expectations.

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  16. James says:

    I wonder what he would likely get in arbitration, and whether that would be enough for him to accept arbitration for one year… if the statement that the “Phillies probably need Werth more than any other team in baseball” this offseason is true, then it would seem possible that it would be in his best interest to take the arbitration, and then look at going elsewhere the following year. Given that he’s probably type-A combined with his age and shortcomings, it seems unlikely he’s going to get a huge payday.

    I don’t think Werth accepting arbitration will happen, but after watching the contracts (or lack thereof) that aging players were relegated to last year, I wouldn’t be surprised if sooner or later someone surprisingly accepts arbitration.

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    • WY says:

      I’m sure they will offer him arbitration, and I’m almost equally sure that he will decline it in favor of a multi-year deal. His salary this last year was $7M, which figures into the arbitration thing. Surely some team will give him a multi-year deal with (I’m guessing) an annual salary of $10M plus.

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    • Z2 says:

      Um, Boras is trying to market Werth as a CF to teams, unless he gets hit by a car tomorrow there’s a 0% chance he accepts arbitration.

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  17. WY says:

    I think if they will be okay if they can find a decent RH platoon partner for Brown (assuming he holds up his end of the bargain), and provided Manuel shuffles the lineup appropriately. Victorino and (to a lesser extent) Rollins seem to be better from the right side. With Polanco and Ruiz in there on a daily basis, it’s not too much of an imbalance.

    Of the lefties, Howard is the only with a real big split against lefties as opposed to righties, so I imagine opposing managers will still use their lefty specialists against him regardless of who is around him in the lineup.

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  18. Mr Punch says:

    Polanco was a fine middle infielder, but his offense has declined and he’s at third. And 35 years old. That’s where an upgrade is indicated.

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  19. John says:

    Struggling with men in scoring position. Is that even a skill? Maybe one day Phillies fans will smell the coffee and realize that paying $125 million for a glorified platoon player with no defensive skills is a recipe for burying a franchise.

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    • Mike N says:

      I have a question about this. I noticed that advanced metric guys don’t like the stat “BA with men in scoring position.” It doesn’t seem like a meaningless stat to me. Is it just a sample-size issue? Or what? I’m not criticizing, I’m actually curious.

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      • bsally says:

        Here’s a very good article by Joe Sheehan that sums it up pretty nicely:

        http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=2656

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      • Adam says:

        It is not that it is not important, it is just that it is basically luck. Essentially nobody has shown sustainable ability to hit better with RISP than he normally hits. I did a non-scientific search of players last off-season and looked at all players with more than 10 full seasons as hitters in the last 20 or 30 years, and I did not find a single player with a tOPS of greater than 120 with RISP, which means nobody with a full career hit more than 20% better with RISP than they normally hit.

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      • Jason B says:

        Well stated Adam. Our pattern-seeking minds keep looking for (and even finding!) patterns that just aren’t there.

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  20. B N says:

    “For all of the talk about having alternatives, I’m not sure I see a reasonable one.”

    Actually, they have a few reasonable alternatives:

    1. They make a trade before the season starts. While the FA market is weak for right handers, there are plenty of teams with righty outfielders who’d give them up for a modest return. I mean, right handedness IS more common than left handedness, last I checked.

    2. Better solution: Midseason trade. They wait til midseason then pick up a righty bat. Even better, because by that point certain teams are sure they’re out of it and are willing to move players.

    3. Cheap solution: Sign a rebound candidate. Isn’t Manny Ramirez a FA? Isn’t he like… one of the best RH hitters of the generation? Maybe they could see if that guy could still swing a bat. Admittedly, the defense sucks, but if you’re platooning him and Ibanez it’s not like the marginal change is that drastic.

    Personally, I’d just wait until a month or two into the season and pick up a righty from a club that’s fallen out of competition. Ex. Chris Young, of Arizona.

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    • bsally says:

      I don’t think the Diamondbacks are going to part with Young, he signed a deal through 2013 with an option for about 30m. Very reasonable for a young player coming off a 4.3 WAR season. The Phillies’ farm system is pretty depleted also; I don’t know who they could realistically trade for.

      While Ibanez is terrible defensively Manny is on a level of his own. He’s a full time DH at this point for sure.

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      • B N says:

        It’s true that Young would probably be a near-untouchable asset if the Diamondbacks are in contention or are building for 2012 (which is likely). On the other hand, if they end up in a full rebuild mode then they’d probably be open to moving him for a solid haul. With that said, Young would be near the top of guys who could be pried loose. Other guys near the top would be Corey Hart, Marlon Byrd, or Beltran (if the Mets fade and look for max-haul). Its not like any of these guys would come free, but they’re worth more to a contending team than the straight-up value of the prospects in an even swap. If none of those guys were available, there would still be teams like the Rockies with a surplus of outfielders (Fowler, Spilborghs). The moral of the story is, I can imagine a lot of bats being available at the right price during the season- available for less risk and cost than Werth.

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    • ColonelTom says:

      Manny on a one-year make-good deal makes a boatload of sense for the Phils.

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      • chuckb says:

        Do you think any GM or manager wants to deal with a Manny Ramirez who plays only once out of every 3 or 4 days?

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      • sean says:

        only problem is it doesn’t make sense for manny to do that. he’ll get offered a DH job in the AL, and also the phillies farm system isn’t depleted, the talent is just at the lower levels

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      • B N says:

        @chuckb: That depends on if Manny is hitting.

        @sean: Manny would probably prefer a job in the field rather than a job as a DH. Almost every player does, because it means more money usually. And if there’s one thing Manny follows, it’s money. Also, while I haven’t caught a lot of Manny over the last couple of years, I have trouble imagining him being much worse than Burrell on the Phillies. Of course, that kind of defense means he’s worthless if struggling- but useful if hitting. Either way, for the right price it’s not bad for a dice roll. The Mets did all right with Sheffield, in my opinion. Similar situation.

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      • Jason B says:

        “That depends on if Manny is hitting.”

        More depends on whether he’s *playing* or not. If he’s playing, he’s hitting.

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  21. pft says:

    If the Yankees made a play for Werth or Crawford, they might be looking to trade Granderson or Swisher.

    If the Red Sox make a play for Crawford or Werth, they might be willing to trade Ellsbury or Cameron, maybe even JD Drew.

    And I wonder if the Mets would eat some salary to unload Jason Bay, assuming Ibanez can still play RF. Jason bay is not as bad as he played last year, not sure if it’s bad advance scouting or a terrible poor hitting coach, but his swing and approach was a mess last year.

    Not much on the FA market, this is likely going to be the year of the trade.

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    • sean says:

      the only legitimate suggestion here is swisher, the rest make little to no sense as possiblities

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    • vivalajeter says:

      Jason Bay would look terrific in the middle of their lineup, but I can’t see the Mets swapping him for Ibanez. That’s a risky trade for either team to make with a division rival.

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  22. drumzalicious says:

    If the Twins dump Kubel the Phils could eat some salary and ship him to the Twins.

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  23. Joe says:

    Is suggesting Beltre just redundant because of what people think he’ll cost? Isn’t attempting to move Polanco the right move if you can?

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    • bsally says:

      Probably too expensive, I would guess Beltre and Werth will get similar annual salaries and the lack of funds is the foremost problem in resigning Werth.

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    • chuckb says:

      I think this makes more sense. Polanco is probably more tradeable than Ibanez is, despite the extra year, and I’d rather have Beltre over the next 4 years than worth, due to defense and position. I think Beltre’s probably too expensive for the Phils to pursue as well but this is a better option to me than trying to resign Werth.

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    • Nik says:

      Polanco did a great job on defense and is excellent for this lineup (mitigates some of the K’s further down in the lineup). All this despite a bone chip in his elbow (Thanks, Huddy). At 2 more years with 6mil/per why would they want to trade him?

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  24. don says:

    I expect Francisco to get a lot of starts against lefties, both as insurance for Brown’s growing pains and insurance for Ibanez’s aging. He’s probably not going to be better than an average player but neither is Ibanez and it’s hard to know what to expect from Brown.

    Obviously Werth is better but they lost the chance to sign Werth when they signed Howard, I think. It was one or the other and now Howard is owed too much money.

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  25. Adam says:

    Yes, the lack of right-handed bats is a problem for the Phillies. On the other hand, if you are going to have a problem, I guess you might as well have the exact same problem that your closest division rival has.

    Pretty much all the suggestions for right-handed bats here have been made for the Braves’ outfield holes as well. The Braves are pretty much just as lefty-heavy as the Phillies, especially with Freeman (another lefty) taking over first base next year.

    It should be an interesting off-season if the Phillies decide they need a RH outfielder. That would leave the Phillies and Braves with relatively little money both chasing after the same free agents and trade candidates.

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  26. neuter_your_dogma says:

    Which teams are really serious landing places for Werth?

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  27. IH says:

    Victorino is very strong against LHP (850 OPS vs 740 against RHP ) and Francisco is solid against LHP (800 OPS) and a defensive upgrade over Ibanez. Werth problem mitigated if Manuel (1) bats Victorino between Howard and Ibanez, so a situational lefty has to face Victornio after striking-out Howard and (2) routinely starts Francicso in place of Brown/Ibanez against LHP.

    I’d also split Utley and Howard with Polanco to (1) get more at bats for Utley and (2) dissuade the use of situational leftys against Utley.

    Lineup vs LHP: Rollins, Utley, Polanco, Howard, Victorino, Ibanez/Brown, Francisco, Chooch.

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  28. Nik says:

    Seriously, why did this article not mention the fact that the Phils were better this year against LHP and Werth was not a factor (reverse split). Pretty much kill the entire point of the article.

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    • mowill says:

      That Werth had a reverse split is irrelevant. He outperformed the rest of the team hitting both lh and rh pitching so in actuality he was instrumental in the teams performance against both righties and lefties. Duh!

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      • Nik says:

        So he’s a good hitter. I dont think an article needed to be written about that. The fact is the whole ‘too left handed’ lineup thing is totally overblown. They’ll throw in Francisco against tough LHPs even if they dont sign or trade for another outfielder.

        They might also sign a guy Andrew Jones for extra RH pop.

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  29. Exactly what I was looking for, regards for putting up. comments by Shanon Talboti @ This article is mentioned in the email from Matilde Forshaw @ <a href=??ttp://www.androidcloudapp.com/??android cloud app

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  31. Jason B says:

    SWEET!! I always wanted to “buy the gift of the rich.” I bet its a Waterford crystal doo-dad. Or a Faberge egg.

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