The Other Half of the Story About Derek Jeter’s Defense

This article originally ran in February, and is now being re-posted on account of Derek Jeter.

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Run a Google search for “Derek Jeter” and “defense” and you get almost 700,000 results. Run a Google search for “Chipper Jones” and you get fewer than 450,000 results. I suppose now you can bump each of those up by one. The matter of Jeter’s defense is a tired, tired topic, and it was a tired, tired topic years ago. Personally, I try to avoid tired topics. But in this instance, I think there’s something; something not enough attention has been paid to on account of the raging argument elsewhere. People have argued about only part of the story.

You all should be familiar with the position of the advanced defensive metrics like DRS and UZR. It’s because of those metrics that an argument exists in the first place. Jeter loyalists have continued to insist he was at least a solid defensive shortstop in the past. UZR has disagreed, and DRS has more extremely disagreed, as they’ve both evaluated Jeter as subpar for the position. On the occasion of Jeter’s retirement announcement, there were people who couldn’t help but make fun of his defensive ability, and he’s been the butt of such jokes for much of his career. Jeter’s often been described as an awful defensive shortstop, or as something along those lines. While there’s been some basis for this, though, one of the key words in that description is “shortstop.”

Let’s say you’re a professional pie-eater. Congratulations! You’re one of the lucky ones! You’re able to reliably consume three pies in a timed sitting. Among the pie-eating circuit, this makes you more or less average. In one competition, against weaker foes, you eat your three pies, and no one else eats more than two. You’ve won! Then you move on to another, more challenging competition. Against stronger foes, you eat your three pies, but most everyone else eats four. You’ve lost. Your ability level was exactly the same, but the peers you were matched up against were better than the peers before, so relatively speaking, you looked worse.

This has, in essence, been Jeter’s dilemma. Statistically, he’s been a below-average defensive shortstop, and everybody knows that. He’s also been a shortstop for his entire career, and shortstops are above-average defenders, relative to the Major League Baseball player pool. So on the one hand, Jeter’s been one of the worst. But on the other, he’s been one of the worst out of the best, so it’s important remember defensive numbers come within a certain positional context. Maybe Jeter’s like the worst beer from an excellent brewery.

In case you haven’t been able to look ahead, this whole post is basically just going to call attention to Jeter’s Defense rating. Every player on FanGraphs gets a Fielding rating, and a Positional rating. Combine them and you get the Defense rating, which allows for a direct comparison of players across different positions. Most of the talk about Jeter has had to do with the Fielding rating. That paints an incomplete picture.

In the past 50 years, 507 different players have batted at least 5,000 times. Sort by Fielding-per-150-games, and you find Jeter in 487th place, around names like Jay Buhner, Michael Young and Bobby Bonilla. However, sort by Positional-per-150-games, and you find Jeter in 57th place, around names like Cal Ripken, Rafael Furcal and Omar Vizquel. This is the positional adjustment, and Jeter gets major points for being a shortstop — a position of considerable difficulty.

Sort by Defense-per-150-games, and you find Jeter in 252nd place. In other words, he’s right in the middle of the pack, near guys like Jeff Blauser, Andre Dawson and Willie McGee. He comes out at -1.5 runs on that scale. He’s ahead of John Olerud. He’s ahead of Mark Grace and Rickey Henderson and Moises Alou. Jeter has drawn the criticism that he’s cost his team runs by playing a lousy shortstop, but overall he’s still been a reasonably valuable defensive player. That’s just because of his reliability at a difficult position.

The numbers they have at Baseball-Reference like Jeter less, and if you use their numbers for those same 507 guys in the past 50 years, you find Jeter in 341st place. It’s a worse place, to be sure, but it’s certainly not a dreadful place. And Jeter’s right by names like Nick Markakis and Shannon Stewart. He’s ahead of Jeff Bagwell. And of course, we’re loyal to the numbers we have right here, so I look at these as a backup.

Let’s say you only want to know about the era during which we’ve had UZR. This stretches from 2002 to 2013, and during that span, 322 players have batted at least 2,500 times. Keep in mind this window ignores Jeter’s youngest years. Sort by Fielding-per-150-games, and you find Jeter in 280th place. Sort by Positional-per-150-games, and you find Jeter in 50th place. Sort by Defense-per-150-games, and you find Jeter in 161st place. Again, right in the middle. His spreadsheet neighbors include Andrew McCutchen, Eric Byrnes and Ronnie Belliard. I feel like I’d just be repeating myself if I noted the significance of this. There’s a difference between criticizing Jeter as a defensive shortstop, and criticizing Jeter as a defensive player.

To the eyes, Jeter can be pretty convincingly OK. At least, that has to be the takeaway from so many Yankees fans insisting he’s been fine. Part of that is because Yankees fans haven’t been able to watch any other Yankees shortstops. Part of it is because his missed plays aren’t egregious. Part of it is because the bar for defensive shortstops is really high, and so even a weaker shortstop can look playable. And part of it is because Jeter has long been so athletic, because his position has demanded it, because his position has been among the most demanding. He’s looked like he belongs on the field. That’s mostly because he has.

I get that Derek Jeter is polarizing, and I get that it’s fun to criticize a player the media’s never stopped putting on a pedestal. It’s certainly worthwhile to note Jeter hasn’t been a great defensive shortstop. While he’ll have absolutely zero trouble getting into the Hall of Fame, defense still is important when it comes to our understanding of what he’s been as a player. Jeter has had his on-field shortcomings. But it’s also important to not get carried away. For his position, Jeter’s been one of the game’s worse defensive players. His position has included some of the very best defensive players in baseball. In terms of overall value, those about negate one another. In the end, the most correct opinion of Jeter’s defensive ability is, `Hey, he’s been all right.’



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Jeff made Lookout Landing a thing, but he does not still write there about the Mariners. He does write here, sometimes about the Mariners, but usually not.


Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Derek Jeter
Guest
Derek Jeter

But I have 5 Gold Gloves!!!

Rafael Palmeiro
Guest
Rafael Palmeiro

Defense!

Seattleslew
Guest
Seattleslew

When I think of Rafael Palmeiro this is what comes to mind.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JClB4KYoD_c

Jose Canseco
Guest
Jose Canseco

Neither of you have anything on ME!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbIHRGUesZQ

Nick C
Guest
Nick C

You sure do, Captain.

shthar
Guest
shthar

…and 5 rings…so far.

Jeffrey Maier
Guest
Jeffrey Maier

You’re welcome

Sonic The Hedgehog
Guest
Sonic The Hedgehog

Five rings? Pffttt!!!

tz
Guest
tz

And 5 Silver Sluggers. Which most likely is spot-on, unless he lost to someone like Tejada because of his notoriously low RBI totals.

N1120A
Guest

He lost 2 to Tejada, after A-Rod went to the Yanks and switched to 3B (which shouldn’t have happened – Jeter should have moved to 3B). Tejada was the better hitter in those years, so not robbed.

DNA+
Guest
DNA+

No Jeter should not have switched. We now know for a fact that the Yankees made the correct decision. As a Yankee Arod was the inferior defender, and he was not capable of staying on the field even at the less demanding position.

Gyre
Guest
Gyre

Gold Gloves are given out to induce sales of gloves. There are hundreds of examples of the superior defender on the small market team being left out.

larry
Guest
larry

while i completely agree with your 2nd sentence, i think you might be a little off on the cause…

Matt
Guest
Matt

And the classic example of Rafael Palmeiro winning a Gold Glove in 1999, while only playing only 28 games in the field, 128 at DH.

flipstermania
Guest
flipstermania

Versus his peers,there’s 6-8 teams where Jeter would have rode the bench and had a very short career, compared to stats of the starting SS. Worst range factor in league, 82% of his hits are slap singles, almost all to right field. Put him in Kansas City and we’d never hear of him, except for longevity stats.

Cicero
Guest
Cicero

his OPS is top ten all time for a SS for players with 2000 PA I doubt anyone benches him

Drew
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Drew

He wouldn’t have ridden the bench. He’d have started at third or something.

Scott
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Scott

Your hatred of the Yankees blinds you. And makes you say really dumb stuff.

james
Guest
james

Gold Gloves are good when you are comparing reputation of good fielders, but a terrible way now. The historical stats are were based on plays made, fielding percentage, and errors made. Now we look at so much more than that. Enough of the voters are stuck in the past, that they will not accept that those are not the be all end all of defense evaluation.

The other issue is that Jeter looks like a better defender than he really is. He makes plays at the edge of his range more often than most guys do. His dives and jump throws look good, and he is very good at those moves. The problem with that thinking is that his range is terrible. He converts more plays at the edge of his range, but those same plays to a guy like Simmons is routine. Even a guy with average range is not having to do jump plays and dives to get at the balls jeter struggles to reach.

So basically he is a sure handed guy, and as a results looks good out there. But the rest of the story is range, and there it is harder to see unless you watch him side by side make a lot of plays, but in range he is a mess.

His hitting is also a rough sell. I personally do not like looking at rbi and runs since they are very team dependant. That leaves average (obp ect), home runs, and stolen bases. .309, 358 sb and 260 hr. Compared to a guy like biggio (281, 291, 414), nomar (313, 229, 95) and Alomar (.300, 210, 474). I see a player who is clearly in that same group (they are all middle infeilders, even if SS is tougher than 2b). With only one of that group in the hall, it is hard to say on hitting alone Jeter should be in the hall. If Biggio (who played the exact same era, and was a plus defender at 3 up the middle positions vs. jeter being a negative at SS), is not a first ballot HoF, Jeter should not be either. With that, I think Biggio belongs in the hall, and so does jeter, but not a first ballot no questions asked type of player.

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