The Other Half of Troy Tulowitzki Going Nuts

The best player in baseball so far has been Troy Tulowitzki. He made it to 4 WAR before any other player made it to 3 WAR. Tulowitzki isn’t the entire reason why the Rockies have been a pleasant surprise, but he’s more responsible for their success than any other player is responsible for his own team’s success, and as long as Tulowitzki is able to stay on the field, he ought to resemble an MVP candidate. Healthy Tulowitzki is always an MVP candidate.

Let’s break that WAR down a little bit. As the best player in baseball, Tulowitzki has been the best hitter in baseball. It’s true that he spends half his time in a hitter’s paradise, but we have numbers that adjust for that, and the adjustment is built into the fact. The most conspicuous part of Tulowitzki’s hot streak has been his offensive productivity. You don’t just overlook a .764 slugging percentage. But another thing that’s true is that Tulowitzki has been among the best defenders in baseball. He’s on track for a career-best UZR. He’s already at a dozen Defensive Runs Saved, after finishing last year at +6. We’ve long known that Tulowitzki is a good defensive shortstop, but thus far he’s been out of his mind, just as he’s been at the plate. So one wonders: just what has he been doing?

This is going to lean on some Inside Edge data, and this is going to look somewhat similar to last week’s piece about Andrelton Simmons. With Simmons, the idea was to explain the curiously modest DRS. With Tulowitzki, the idea is to explain the curiously amazing DRS. What has he done, specifically, and what might be learned from all this?

Let’s do a super-quick review. Inside Edge classifies defensive plays. One classification is Impossible — these are plays with a 0% chance of getting turned into outs. The next classification is Remote — these are plays with a 1-10% chance of getting turned into outs, in the opinion of the observer. The full list:

  • Impossible (0%)
  • Remote (1-10%)
  • Unlikely (10-40%)
  • Even (40-60%)
  • Likely (60-90%)
  • Routine (90-100%)

The classifications are subjective, but they tend to hold up pretty well. Indeed, remote plays are usually not made. Routine plays are usually routine. Last year, Brandon Crawford led baseball with five remote plays turned into outs. The year before, Mike Moustakas had five, and Alcides Escobar had six. Between 2012-2013, Troy Tulowitzki converted just one single remote play. He converted six unlikely plays. He was a good shortstop, but he didn’t make a habit of pulling off the extraordinary.

This year, Tulowitzki has already converted four remote plays. He’s added a pair of unlikely plays. The defensive numbers suggest Tulowitzki has done the near impossible, and Inside Edge backs that up. If you look at the plays counted against him, Tulowitzki has failed to convert a handful of impossible plays, and 11 remote plays, and two even plays. That’s it. All the easy stuff has been converted, all the slightly less-easy stuff has been converted, and a lot of the difficult stuff has been converted. Tulowitzki still hasn’t been charged with an error. He really has gone nuts across the board, performing at an overall superhuman level.

So as in the Simmons post, let’s look at some defensive plays. Here are Tulowitzki’s six most difficult converted plays, in chronological order. As noted earlier, four of these were classified as remote, and two were classified as unlikely. These plays are a big reason why Tulowitzki’s defensive numbers are absurd. Basically, we’re partially deconstructing DRS and UZR, so you can see the plays supporting the calculations.

.Gif warning, by the way. It’s too late, I guess.

Play No. 1

Tulo1.gif.opt

From April 1, it’s a remote play, converted against a quick Marcell Ozuna. The talent is readily obvious. Tulo covered a lot of ground, backhanded the ball cleanly, and threw across the infield in midair while falling away. It’s the Derek Jeter play, if the Derek Jeter play involved range, and Ozuna was out by a fraction of a step. It’s easy to see why this was valuable. It’s also easy to see how this could’ve gone differently. Notice that Tulowitzki was helped by the first baseman stepping into foul territory while keeping his foot on the bag. With very little difference, this could’ve been an infield single, for which no one would’ve blamed the shortstop.

Play No. 2

Tulo2.gif.opt

Hey, it’s kind of that same play again, this time on April 7, this time against a slower Jose Abreu. It’s an insane backhand and an insane off-balance throw, but once more, you can see how this could’ve been an RBI infield single. Tulo’s throw was mostly accurate, but it required both a stretch and a dig, since it was a little off target and short-hopped Justin Morneau. Tulo did almost all the hard work, but Morneau completed the play, and for him it wasn’t routine.

Play No. 3

Tulo3.gif.opt

The first two were considered remote — this was considered unlikely. Nevertheless, Tulo made a play behind second base and made another awkward throw to nail a runner by a fraction of a fraction of a second. Had the runner been someone other than Nick Hundley, he might’ve been safe, but had the runner been someone other than Nick Hundley, Tulowitzki might’ve lined up differently. This play is just nonsense. Also nonsense: the play that happened literally two pitches later.

Play No. 4

Tulo4.gif.opt

Right after the unlikely play on Hundley, there was this remote play on Robbie Erlin. Seriously, right after, separated by maybe a minute. The ball took a funny bounce off the mound, requiring Tulowitzki to adjust his path in an instant, and then he charged and bare-handed and got the pitcher-runner by a blink. The throw, once more, wasn’t perfect, but you can forgive the imperfection, on account of the perfection of everything else. Morneau had to stretch, but stretch he did.

Play No. 5

Tulo5.gif.opt

An unlikely fielder’s choice, with Joaquin Arias batting on April 22. The stop was flawless. The throw was flawless. Tulowitzki didn’t just save a run — he recorded an out, on a ball that probably usually gets through. Stop and think for a moment about how difficult this is. Look away from the computer and imagine that you’re Tulowitzki, doing this in this game. Wow, you’re amazing!

Play No. 6

Tulo6.gif.opt

This is classified as remote, and Tulowitzki recorded not one out, but two. The hard part was the diving catch — doubling off the runner was automatic, although it was cute of the runner to try. I will say I’m not sure this was a 1-10% play; it’s easier to make a diving catch than a diving stop and throw. But it’s definitely a low-percentage play, so Tulowitzki gets a mountain of credit.

That doesn’t completely explain Tulowitzki’s defensive numbers — there are also all the easier plays, each of which he’s made. Pitch-framing has two components: preserving strikes in the zone, and getting strikes out of the zone. Defense also has two components: not screwing up the routine, and pulling off the difficult. Tulowitzki’s done everything, so for that reason, he’s probably earned his defensive statistics. You can also see, though, why those numbers should settle down. Some of the amazing plays required assistance from the first baseman. Some just barely got the runner, where the slightest difference might’ve made the biggest difference. I think you can see, even in these six plays, that Tulowitzki is an outstanding shortstop who’s also gotten a little lucky. Sometimes, he’s going to be a little too slow. Sometimes, his throws are going to be a little bit off. He’s running too high a rate of converting the most difficult plays in the game, and that’s too extreme to sustain.

But it’s also something extreme that’s happened. Tulowitzki has made all these plays, and so many other ones. How do you explain Troy Tulowitzki already having 4 WAR? A slugging percentage that starts with a 7, an on-base percentage that almost starts with a 5, and an assortment of almost impossible defensive plays as a shortstop. No, Tulowitzki probably isn’t going to finish with the greatest single season ever. But he could certainly finish with the greatest single season of the season. What’s in the bag is in the bag, and what has yet to happen is going to involve Troy Tulowitzki, and all of his skills.



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Jeff made Lookout Landing a thing, but he does not still write there about the Mariners. He does write here, sometimes about the Mariners, but usually not.


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Kris
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Kris
2 years 8 days ago

Tulo + Arenado over there is just unfair. Is it possible that having Tulo at SS allows Arenado to play a little closer to the foul line, thus giving him more opportunites for those insane plays on balls down the line?

Cicero
Guest
Cicero
2 years 8 days ago

That 6’4″ 2B Lemahieu isn’t half bad either

bearsbball12
Guest
bearsbball12
2 years 8 days ago

Yeah LeMahieu is really good too. He just tends to get overlooked because he isn’t crazy bonkers good like Tulo and Arenado are.

Nate
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Nate
2 years 8 days ago

I like how in the first video Arenado tries to field the ball, but in the following ones he usually just stands there assuming Tulo will probably do something crazy.

bobabaloo
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bobabaloo
2 years 8 days ago

im still convinced those jump throws make plays look harder than they actually are. a plant and strong throw seems much quicker to me, it would be cool to see a side by side or something.

Orsulakfan
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Orsulakfan
2 years 8 days ago

C’mon, man, these plays are bonkers any way you slice it. The key is how much he gets on his throw WITHOUT having to take the time to set.

Tyler
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Tyler
2 years 8 days ago

“The key is how much he gets on his throw WITHOUT having to take the time to set.”

…which would be much more, if he planted and fired. Also, it doesn’t take time to dig that foot in and fire; no more time than it does to make that ridiculous leap in the air. Also, planting is a more accurate way to throw. Some of Tulo’s throws are suspect.

what
Guest
what
2 years 8 days ago

plant and fire while running the opposite direction? First you have to stop. He does it that way because it is faster

frivoflava29
Member
frivoflava29
2 years 8 days ago

“plant and fire while running the opposite direction? First you have to stop. He does it that way because it is faster”

Yeah, where does everyone think the momentum is going to go if he just stops? He’s got to jump if he wants to save the precious seconds in takes to throw Ozuna out (although maybe not Abreu). Given my limited knowledge of physics, I think he’d have to weigh so much that there would probably be a visible shockwave in the dirt where he stopped himself, probably also making him a true god.

AK7007
Member
AK7007
2 years 8 days ago

Summation of this argument: douches who hate fun and baseball vs people who just plain love .gifs

I love .gifs

Cicero
Guest
Cicero
2 years 8 days ago

Tulo is 6’3″ 220lbs, maybe it is easy for a 160lb SS to stop on a dime but a college linebacker playing short can’t just stop his momentum like that

Spit Ball
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Spit Ball
2 years 8 days ago

You can’t be serious. He had way too much energy headed toward left center to do anything different on the Ozuna and Abreu plays. Planting and throwing was out of the question. Mind you Tulo got plenty of mustard on both throws.

SimonSays
Member
SimonSays
2 years 8 days ago

The problem is planting. You’re running full out away from where you want to go, bend over at the wait to pick something up, and then have to throw it. Planting and throwing will probably get you more on the throw. But there are some notable advantages to the jump throw:

1) Less chance of slipping. Planting and turning more than 90 degrees has serious footing risks. Remember that they’re only playing on grass and dirt and those things tend to give way under stress. On a jump throw you chuck it and can slide any which way.

2) Get the ball out faster. You don’t have to wait for your back foot to plant before you throw. You can throw off of any foot and don’t have to stop your momentum with a plant. This obviously has a bigger advantage the closer you are to the base, because

3) Comparable, but not identical throwing strength. This is the crux of the argument: can you throw the ball harder off a plant and turn or a jump throw? Obviously a plant and turn. But how much faster? Not that much, actually (relative to the distance to first). On a jump throw, you don’t have to fight the ground. So you can turn freely in the air. You bottom half can turn fast enough to generate a significant amount of torque. The arm strength is there already. It may not be as good on the arm, but you’re generating something nearish to your normal arm strength.

Combining 2 and 3, if you can’t time up the plant well (1) it is faster to jump throw.

Schuxu
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Schuxu
2 years 8 days ago

Run with that Speed he is when he starts the jump throw and try to plant with just one step. You will fail miserably and you will propably blow out your ankle.
From this speed you need several steps to slow down before planting and throwing and that takes longer then the jump throw.

tx ball scout
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tx ball scout
2 years 8 days ago

I agree. We teach our guys to not go airborne. Stay low and drive against plant foot.

MDL
Member
MDL
2 years 8 days ago

I remember a few years back watching an interview with Garciaparra in which he pointed out that he would plant his right leg to throw (and he threw right-handed). Not sure I’ve ever seen anything else like that.

The Captain
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The Captain
2 years 8 days ago

Am I missing something? What shortstop wouldn’t use his right foot to plant?

arc
Guest
arc
2 years 8 days ago

I’m pretty sure you’ve seen *everything* else like that.

Bobby Ayala
Member
Member
2 years 8 days ago

If you ever played Short and went right to snag a grounder you would know it’s guaranteed always faster to jump and throw. The loss of velocity on the throw is not nearly as great as the time you save by not planting and stopping. That’s why every MLB SS does it, that’s why every fielding coach teaches it.

bobabaloo
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bobabaloo
2 years 8 days ago

i don’t agree that every shortstop does it. seems to me more guys don’t ever do it than do. but ive been watching the tigers for too long, so i could be wrong.

bearsbball12
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bearsbball12
2 years 8 days ago

The reason a lot of guys don’t do it is they can’t make an accurate throw that way. No doubt it gets the ball there faster though, so if you are able to be accurate with it that’s the way to go.

bobabaloo
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bobabaloo
2 years 8 days ago

and i don’t know what level of baseball you’re talking about, but i’ve never seen a high school kid make a jump throw from short.

SKob
Guest
2 years 8 days ago

You’ve probably never seen a kid who has been drafted out of high school either!

eyetwitch
Member
eyetwitch
2 years 8 days ago

Andrelton Simmons does not make the jump throw. He plants his feet almost every single time. I can’t actually recall the last time I saw him jump throw.

a eskpert
Guest
a eskpert
2 years 8 days ago

But…Andrelton Simmons. Is Andrelton Simmons.

Marsupial Jones
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Marsupial Jones
2 years 6 days ago

Yeah, well Simmons also throws guys out from shallow LF with NO FEET PLANTED.

Saying “well possibly the best defensive SS we have ever seen can do it. Why doesnt everyone?” isnt really a valid starting point.

Old Uncle Bitumen
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Old Uncle Bitumen
2 years 6 days ago

Anyone who thinks its easier/quicker to stop dead and plant solidly enough to make a strong throw after being at basically a full sprint has clearly never actually tried to do that.

Mike Green
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Mike Green
2 years 8 days ago

Thanks for the GIFs, Jeff. I had no idea whether the defensive numbers were a sample size or classification mirage or something real and unusual. You’ve sold me.

DNA+
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DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

The Derek Jeter play does involve range. It isn’t hard to find videos of Jeter making the jump throw from much deeper than Tulo is in the first gif. Hell, Tulo isn’t even off the dirt. Jeter’s range problems are generally to his left, not in the hole.

Only glove, no love
Member
Only glove, no love
2 years 8 days ago

Are you saying Jeets would have made those plays from the same initial position?

He got much better after the Everett article but you can not be serious.

DNA+
Guest
DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

No, I am not saying that Jeter would have made any of those plays. “Range” as measured by the various metrics, does not consider the positioning of the fielder to my knowledge. I am serious. Just because Jeter is not a great defensive shortstop does not mean he never makes great defensive plays. He does.

Only glove, no love
Member
Only glove, no love
2 years 8 days ago

No one disputes that Jeter has made great defensive plays, especially the A’s. Really, no one does that.

The difference between my range and Jeets is much much much greater than the difference btwn Jeets and Tulo and Everett and Ryan etc…

That being said, he has very limited range for a SS in MLB.

He’s never had a cannon arm either.

DNA+
Guest
DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

“No one disputes that Jeter has made great defensive plays, especially the A’s. Really, no one does that.”

“It’s the Derek Jeter play, if the Derek Jeter play involved range.”

I interpret Jeff’s comment to imply just that. I seriously doubt Jeff believes this, however his statement was factually incorrect, and it was a cheap shot that didn’t need to be made.

SimonSays
Member
SimonSays
2 years 8 days ago

“No one disputes that Jeter has made great defensive plays, especially the A’s. Really, no one does that.”

I question this all the time. Were guys like Jim Edmonds or Jeter just slow? Did they make routine-ish plays look great because of that? Was Andruw Jones really the god in center I thought he was? Was all that eye candy that I grew up on just an illusion? Is something a “great play” if everyone else in the league would’ve made the play but you made it look like sex on a bun because you barely made it there?

That’s why we come to FanGraphs. That’s why we have an obsession with baseball statistics. To question *everything* we thought we knew.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Yeah, he’s saying Jeter doesn’t have a lot of range, and that’s true. I highly doubt Jeter ranges that far and makes that play. Are you saying he would have? If not, where’s the controversy?

DNA+
Guest
DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

No, he is saying that the jump throw play that Jeter made famous did not involve range and that is false. It is very easy to find several examples of Jeter making that play from deep in the third base hole from the outfield grass.

There is no question that Jeter was never a great defensive shortstop. However, we still owe Jeter credit where it is due. There really isn’t any need to bash the guy every time an article on shortstop defense comes up, especially when the statement is factually incorrect.

Jackie T.
Member
Member
Jackie T.
2 years 8 days ago

Between your comments yesterday on the Bob Ryan piece and here you are proving yourself to be quite the sensitive little contrarian, DNA+.

DNA+
Guest
DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

Contrarian sure. Though from my perspective the sensitive ones are those that react so strongly to it. Personally, I prefer to read opinions that are different to my own, and I seldom bother to comment about something that I agree with.

AK7007
Member
AK7007
2 years 8 days ago

“quite the sensitive little contrarian”

Call it what it is – trolling. Snark about Jeter’s range is fair humor, and snark about baseball is why I love reading Jeff’s stuff. Only trolls would try to turn it into a problem.

DNA+
Guest
DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

I’m glad you enjoyed the the joke. I thought it was a cheap shot that detracted from an otherwise very good piece. If that makes me a troll, it makes you overly sensitive.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

and you thinking is was a cheap shot instead of a joke makes YOU overly sensitive…see how easily things can be twisted?

DNA+
Guest
DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

Actually, I thought it was both a joke and a cheap shot.

Jackie T.
Member
Member
Jackie T.
2 years 8 days ago

Guys, in a 1,400-word article entirely about Troy Tulowitzki that made a single, passing reference to Derek Jeter’s defense DNA+ has only responded with eight blowhard comments defending Derek Jeter. How dare you call him sensitive.

Oh wait, that was me.

DNA+
Guest
DNA+
2 years 8 days ago

Andrew,

My comments were about the content of the article, even if not the focus of the article (which I agree with). Your comments were about me. Cheers.

Yeah
Guest
Yeah
2 years 6 days ago

You guys trying to make out like DNA+ doesn’t have a valid point are embarrassing yourselves. Also the Jeter has no defense trope is so old by now it’s not even as funny as watching Derek Jeter try to play shortstop.

Hurtlocker
Guest
Hurtlocker
2 years 8 days ago

Tulo has been great in the firld, but Crawford had been better. Too bad Crawford can’t hit like Tulo.

Only glove, no love
Member
Only glove, no love
2 years 8 days ago

I would love to see a gif by gif comparison of those two from this year!

And Simmons just to see what difference there is.

And Brendan Ryan.

SimonSays
Member
SimonSays
2 years 8 days ago

I miss Brendan Ryan. He had a 27 runs saved at 28, well out of his fielding prime according to most graphs.

SabathiaWouldBeGoodAtTheEighthToo
Guest
SabathiaWouldBeGoodAtTheEighthToo
2 years 8 days ago

No offense to the Ryan lovers out there, but he seems to botch a routine play every game he plays for the Yankees. I am sure he reaches some balls that Jeter doesn’t, but NYY fans have not really had the opportunity to see the Ryan defensive whiz we have heard so much about.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Ryan isn’t as good as he used to be, but he’s also 32 and not playing regularly.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Tulo has 4 times as many defensive runs saved as Crawford this year. Tulo’s UZR is much, much better, he’s made more plays outside of zone, and his RZR is better. How has Crawford been better?

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

BTW, I’ve been a Crawford fan since his college days. I’m a big UCLA Fan. I wanted my team to draft him so very bad and he’s a very good player…but still.

maximillion
Guest
maximillion
2 years 8 days ago

Nice grab, but he should have gone to third on Play No. 5.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Why? He may have thought there was a chance for two (which is more likely when the throw is going to 1B from 2B as opposed to 3B) plus he would have had to move his body weird to try and make the throw to 3B.

ralph
Guest
ralph
2 years 8 days ago

That is a MUCH easier throw to second across his body from where he was positioned. Getting the guy at third is probably a bit more valuable but no one wants him to chuck a ball into the dugout, either.

Evan
Guest
Evan
2 years 8 days ago

*Fangraphs post title that should be a Notgraphs post title weekly winner*

Jon L.
Guest
Jon L.
2 years 8 days ago

Those first two could each easily have been singles had the shortstop played them differently, but they also could each have easily been throwing errors, had the shortstop played them exactly as he did. I also don’t feel that the second play, against a slow runner, was remote.

These Gifs are showing why Tulowitzki is a terrific defensive shortstop, but they’re also showing us something about the subjective nature of defensive ratings.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Why would they have been throwing errors? Unless the runner went to second on the play, it’d just be a single like it likely should have been if not for the great play.

SabathiaWouldBeGoodAtTheEighthToo
Guest
SabathiaWouldBeGoodAtTheEighthToo
2 years 8 days ago

I think they show us that Morneau is pretty good too. That usually happens with great SS/3B. If Giambi is playing 1B in those games, Tulo probably has a couple of errors on his bubble gum card.

If he had a lesser defender at 1B, would he still have made those throws?

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

they would only be errors if the runner advance to 2B on the bad throw…because those plays made are anything but routine even if the out isn’t made. If the guy just reaches 1B and nothing more, none of those are errors.

But yeah, Morny is a very good 1B

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Tulo has been a very good fielding shortstop most of his career. Seems many are just taking notice because of all of the other stuff, but he’s won a few fielding bible awards for best fielding shortstop in baseball (regardless of league) already and he’s had double digits DRS in half of his seasons, including his rookie season when he had 31 but somehow lost the GG (a truly worthless award) to Rollins.

arc
Guest
arc
2 years 8 days ago

Is there *anyone* who didn’t know he was a very good fielding shortstop before this year? I seriously doubt it. He’s been known for plus-to-better defense at short since he was drafted.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

‘We’ve long known that Tulowitzki is a good defensive shortstop’

That line in this article seems to somewhat downplay how very good he’s been. All I’m saying is that he’s doing isn’t just out of the blue. Good you notice it too. A healthy Tulo is amazing with glove and bat and pretty much always has been.

jmpmk2
Guest
jmpmk2
2 years 8 days ago

“Is there *anyone* who didn’t know he was a very good fielding shortstop before this year?”

Gold Glove voters in 2007?

Tyler
Guest
Tyler
2 years 8 days ago

Five points I’d like to make.

First, keep these types of posts coming, I love seeing the supporting evidence behind UZR. It sort of validates it for me, gives it some substance. I can look at these plays and say, “yeah, that is a remote or unlikely play to make. This makes sense.”

Second, Tulo is amazing. You know this.

Third, you mentioned that defense “has two components: not screwing up the routine, and pulling off the difficult.” When it comes to UZR, I might add another component: getting the opportunities, of which Tulo has had a plethora. Let’s compare Simmons and Tulo. Tulo has had 216 opportunities: 166 routine (100%), 16 likely (100%), 5 even (40%), 2 unlikely (100%), 18 remote (22.2%), and 9 impossible (0%). Contrarily, Simmons has had 140 opportunities: 98 routine (98%), 13 likely (84.6%), 7 even (85.7%), 5 unlikely (20%), 8 remote (12.5%), and 9 impossible (0%). Tulo seems to be doing better thus far, but he’s clearly had more opportunities to shine. I doubt that will last.

Fourth, as much as I like Tulo, I don’t like that off-balance, falling away, Jeter-esque sidearm throw. I much prefer the way Simmons plants his foot and fires to first: it’s more accurate, and it gets there faster.

Fifth, and somewhat unrelated, will someone please address his absurd Home/Away splits this year (330 Home wRC+/146 Away wRC+)? For a stat that is supposed to adjust for park factor, this is a noteworthy difference.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

I get the splits comment, and because there’s such a huge difference, it stands out. Thing is, he’s still got an OBP of .375 and a slugging % of .519 on the road. If those were his overall season numbers, that OBP would still be tops in baseball for a shortstop as would his slugging %. And the defense would still be awesome.

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Oh, and so would that Away wRC+..and by 15 points.

Tyler
Guest
Tyler
2 years 8 days ago

Right, I agree with you, his road wRC+ is the best among SS, which makes sense, since he is indeed the best hitting SS in baseball. In fact, that road 146 wRC+ is about what I’d expect from Tulo. Nonetheless, that doesn’t explain his 330 home wRC+. This can be expanded to other players for the Rockies (see: Charlie Blackmon splits). Something funky is going on at Coors Field.

SabathiaWouldBeGoodAtTheEighthToo
Guest
SabathiaWouldBeGoodAtTheEighthToo
2 years 8 days ago

The other parks are holding the Rockies back!

bearsbball12
Guest
bearsbball12
2 years 8 days ago

Tulo’s crazy home/road splits, as well as his crazy offensive numbers in general, can be explained pretty easily by a few things.

The explanation of his overall numbers are essentially that Tulo is a really good hitter who is taking more walks and hitting more line drives (by a lot) than he has at any other point in his career.

The home/road splits can largely be explained by a .560 BABIP at home and a .246 BABIP on the road. As the season continues, I’m sure those will both regress closer to his career .319 BABIP, probably a bit higher due to his increased line drive rate.

bearsbball12
Guest
bearsbball12
2 years 8 days ago

And of course the inevitable regression of his current 32.5% HR/FB rate

bearsbball12
Guest
bearsbball12
2 years 8 days ago

Getting the opportunities is something that will likely keep on helping Tulo as well. Rockies pitchers are 4th in the Majors in GB% to the Braves 26th. More ground balls = more chances

nate
Guest
nate
2 years 7 days ago

Rockies pitchers have to be GB pitchers. the only way to survive.

thats the team game plan. GB pitchers, great interior D.

Dan Greer
Member
Dan Greer
2 years 8 days ago

This guy is just flat-out amazing.

Matthew Murphy
Member
2 years 8 days ago

Best single seasons of all-time, by wRC+, qualified batters only:
Bonds
Ruth
Bonds
Bonds
Ruth
Tulowitzki
Ruth
http://www.fangraphs.com/leaders.aspx?pos=all&stats=bat&lg=all&qual=y&type=8&season=2014&month=0&season1=1871&ind=1&team=0&rost=0&age=0&filter=&players=0&sort=18,d

Sean C
Guest
2 years 7 days ago

Whoa.

Richard Bergstrom
Guest
2 years 8 days ago

In going through this article, I can’t help but wonder if a good first baseman ends up helping the UZR/DRS of their entire team. Would a replacement-level first baseman have changed Tulowitzki’s DRS?

Jimmer
Guest
Jimmer
2 years 8 days ago

Absolutely a good 1B helps the UZR/DRS of the entire team because all of his work out there is including in the team UZR/DRS. Helping with great plays is part of that. Even though none of these plays would have been errors if Morny doesn’t do his magic, a good 1B will save some errors…for those who care about errors as a stat.

Cicero
Guest
Cicero
2 years 8 days ago

Just look up the numbers from when Pacheco was there

Swfcdan
Guest
Swfcdan
2 years 8 days ago

Sorry I thought this was about Troy Tulowitzki’s wife.

Ozzie
Guest
Ozzie
2 years 7 days ago

Everybody is missing the point here.
The point is: I’m gettin’ pissed watching these .gifs!
Where’s the love…?
Gonna slow-jam myself to sleep now.

Rockies Fan
Guest
Rockies Fan
1 year 10 months ago

Tulo is fantastic at SS but he seems injure his groin a lot. Maybe because of his jump throws and throwing it off the right leg. Most infielders plant with their left leg….Tulo seems to plant with his right leg.

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