The Travesty

2010 has already been an incredible season, especially in the perfect game department. There had only been 18 in the history of baseball, but now we have witnessed three of them – first by Dallas Braden, then by Roy Halladay, and finally, tonight, Armando Galarraga joined the club.

27 up, 27 down. It’s an exclusive club for a reason: it’s almost impossible to do. You never know what might happen. A lucky bounce here or there, a blown call by an umpire…

Okay, fine, the record books won’t let us pretend that the Travesty of Jim Joyce didn’t happen. The man blew a pretty easy call that cost Galarraga his spot in history. There’s simply no defending him. He screwed up, really badly, in the most important moment of his career.

He’s human. Humans make mistakes. And it’s why the strengths and weaknesses of one single man should never determine the outcome of such a play. There is no argument against instant replay. Any chance the purists had for a “sanctity of the game” argument just went out the window. Armando Galarraga threw a perfect game, but he won’t get credit for it because one umpire screwed up, when 30 seconds of watching a replay on a monitor would have allowed him to correct his call.

This is ridiculous. Replay. Now.

Until then, I suggest MLB invoke “the best interest of the game” and hold a joint press conference with Joyce where everyone involved admits that the call was wrong, and they simply overturn the call and officially credit Galarraga with a perfect game. I don’t care about precedent. This will never happen again. It’s the right thing to do.




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Dave is a co-founder of USSMariner.com and contributes to the Wall Street Journal.


190 Responses to “The Travesty”

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  1. nothingxs says:

    30 seconds? We’d have made the right call in 10. This was an easy call, and Joyce blew it straight to hell.

    They should posthumously overturn the call and give him the perfecto. Everyone knows he threw one, anyways.

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    • larry says:

      posthumously. heh.

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    • bberdl20 says:

      Let me say this much first. I believe baseball is the greatest and most perfect game in the history of the world, and nothing, not instant replay or interleague play or anything can change that. I will have to disagree with Mr. Cameron though. First of all, there have been perfect games that lasted more than 9 innings that do not count because they were no longer perfect when the game was finally finished. This in my opinion shows that the perfect game, while an amazing achievement is not the end all be all of great pitching performances. Secondly, fangraphs just wrote an article about how Halladay’s perfecto was not his best pitched game. Finally, we have no idea how many perfect games or no hitters in the last 100+ years were taken away because of a blown or bad call. It is a slippery slope. Will it eventually lead to re-opening the record books to see if players near 3,000 hits should have been credited with extra hits throughout their careers. I understand that the umpire made a mistake, and I’m sure he knows that. I just don’t believe we are adding integrity to the greatest game in the world by opening up that Pandora’s box.

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      • brett says:

        Didn’t Ty Cobb get credited with another hit recently?

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      • Not yet finished says:

        “First of all, there have been perfect games that lasted more than 9 innings that do not count because they were no longer perfect when the game was finally finished.”

        That’s a logical impossiblity. A game isn’t finished until it’s over. A perfect game isn’t defined ONLY as “27-up 27-down” it’s 27-up and 27-down AND your team wins.

        What would you like a guy credited with 2 perfect games if he pitched 18 innings perfectly?

        A game is not complete until it’s over. A pitcher who goes 9 innings in an 10 inning game isn’t credited with a CG.

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  2. Joe Twinsfan says:

    A-FREAKING-MEN.

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  3. RKO36 says:

    Touche, Dave.

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  4. circlechange says:

    Not that Bud Selig has much credibility left, but if he doesn’t overturn that call he won’t have any.

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    • Kevin S. says:

      He can’t. Baseball has no mechanism for correcting this. The best that could happen would be to give Galarraga an E-1 for “bobbling” the ball and causing Donald to be safe to preserve the no-hitter, but that’s still completely hollow and places the blame on the wrong person.

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      • circlechange says:

        Then the MLB can create a mechanism for it to be reversed. You can’t allow this to happen.

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      • Basil Ganglia says:

        I believe the commissioner has an reserved right to take any action that is in the best interests of baseball. Unless that authority has been removed, Selig has the authority to correct the error by fiat.

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      • mcgreevey1903 says:

        The problem is that the decision’s belongs to Bud Selig, a man with the spine of a jellyfish. Name one instance when he made the right call on a controversial decision…

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      • Bill@TDS says:

        This is false. The MLB constitution unambiguously gives Bud the power to correct this, through the above-mentioned “best interests of baseball” clause and in several other places. If he doesn’t do it, it’s squarely on his greasy little shoulders.

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  5. Keenan says:

    Will fully admit I was one of those purists who did not want instant replay to start intruding into my game.

    Not any more. This did it, this well-named travesty complete changed my mind on the subject.

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    • Cooper says:

      Same here.

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    • wobatus says:

      I’m not purist, but games are too long as it is. He blew an obvious call. Everyone who saw it is the replay ump on this. That said, when games are decided by stuff like this, I’d want replay. Denkinger’s call in the world series is much more egregious than this.

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      • DavidK says:

        “games are too long as it is.” This has always been one of the two biggest arguments against using instant replay. The other is the “purity of the game”. The counter-arguments for these are (1) they could have overturned the call in LESS time than it took for players and manager to argue with the umpire about it, and (2) what does it do to the purity of the game when everyone KNOWS Gallaraga pitched a perfecto, but the record books say otherwise?

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      • pjs24 says:

        Too long compared to what? They are no longer than an average NFL game which everyone seems to hold up as a gold standard. This notion that every single is a BOS-NYY type game is just ridiculous. The games AREN’T too long.

        By the way, this was a one hour, 44 minute dual complete game.

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      • wobatus says:

        Yeah, good points guys. This call would be pretty easy to overturn on replay. There’d be more difficult calls with men on base, but this would take 2 seconds.

        This thread actually made me look up the word travesty. We hear that word all the time, “travesty of justice” but i actually didn’t know it meant a grotesque parody or imitation. I mean, I knew it in context, but didn’t realize you could say the Monkees were a travesty of the Beatles, for example. A really, really dated example.

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      • Oliver says:

        Not sure where I stand on the Denkinger comparison. Clearly, more was at stake in the ’85 series. The Cardinals had the remainder of the game and game seven to rectify the mistake and failed. Galarrage had the tying run on deck and one out left, and nailed down the one-hit shutout. I guess the thing that makes me a little perplexed about this one is that the cost of calling the guy out is completely different between the two games. If Denkinger makes the call, stick a fork in the Royals. The fork was stuck in the Indians’ season over a month ago, and with their weak offense, very little was on the line in a 3-0 game.

        I’m glad that umps don’t weigh the impact of their decisions when making the call, but I’m a little surprised that Joyce would give the runner the benefit of the doubt if the play looked like a tie. Surely he realized that the perfecto hung in the balance. One silver lining in all this is how classy he and Galarraga have comported themselves amid the controversy. I hate to see him made a goat when the situation could have been addressed years ago. Hopefully he’ll lead the charge for replay.

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      • CircleChange11 says:

        Denk’s call came on what would have been just the 1st out in the inning. The mistakes the cards made after the call just make the situation look worse for them.

        It is true that they did have chances to “overcome the call”. But, the comparability is that it was a very important decision that could have easily have been fixed with replay. I am only joking about awarding the cardinals the 85 trophy.

        When you make a decision or change you move forward from that point. You don’t go back and try to undo everything.

        The tough part about the whole scenario is that we have the technology to deal with the situation readily available and it’s inexpensive. The only obstacle is how certain people feel about it. The whole issue of what to do with runners is simple … run at your own risk. Grumbling over a call being corrected and runners having (possibly) to return to the base is much better than grumbling over a bad call. No one wins in a bad call situation.

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  6. OzzieGuillen says:

    Just give each manager a challenge flag, like in the NFL, to be used a maximum of once per game. Leyland would throw the flag, the call would be reversed, history would be made.

    Grow up MLB. Allow clips on Youtube and add some bad umpiring insurance to the game.

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    • Bill@TDS says:

      Giving power to the managers is a terrible idea, IMO — doesn’t work in the NFL and would be a total disaster in baseball. Just have a 5th (or 7th) umpire in a booth with a big TV who can alert the crew immediately if there’s a play he needs to review or overturn. Quick and easy, probably wouldn’t even see a noticeable uptick in game lengths.

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    • CircleChange11 says:

      Why a limit?

      Isn’t the point of replay to correct easily correctable calls?

      What if there are 3 obvoiusly bad calls? Shouldn’t we have them corrected if it’s quick and easy (and replay could be very quick and easy with an official in the booth).

      A lot of folks are being “resistors” and are coming up with remote example scenarios that number far less than the plays that could/would be corrected? I’m not saying that there won’t be “hairy situations”, but they’ll be much less in number than overturned, simple calls.

      Electricity has created some problems, but it fixed a lot more. We could literally talk about technology in ANY field and list pros/cons. The KEY is if the pro outweighs they con … and it does.

      Something does NOT have to be “perfect” in order to be “significantly better”. Some readers are creating a false dichotomy where we have to have guaranteed perfection or no change at all.

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  7. oaktowncubs says:

    the author of this article obviously had armando in his fantasy lineup tonight

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  8. jinsz says:

    Bingo.

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  9. Padman Jones says:

    On the bright side…first ever 28-out perfecto!

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  10. Steven Ellingson says:

    It shouldn’t take 30 seconds. There should be a “replay umpire” who watches every call, and should be able to change calls in moments.

    As far as pace of the game goes, a lot of these calls end up with arguments with coaches, that take much longer than replay would.

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    • nothingxs says:

      I have kept insisting on the idea of a ‘replay umpire’ who watches everything and can make final decisions on things but no one thinks it’s a good idea. Hell I’d do it.

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      • Rick says:

        Agree completely. If nothing else it would be good training for umps to work the booth on occasion. You can give them pitch f/x data while you’re at it.

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    • filihok says:

      I’m with this.

      A replay umpire. He watches the game and any call that is obviously incorrect he signals down to the field and as long as it is before the next pitch the play is corrected.

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      • JH says:

        Man, “replay ump” would have to be the best job ever. Get paid to watch baseball, without any of the hassle of interacting with players and managers.

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    • Scott says:

      They do this in Rugby World Cup. It’s a wonderful thing. Replays take 10-15 seconds. Nothing like the terrible system the NFL has.

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    • CircleChange11 says:

      Fans can watch the replay at home, and text/tweet their buddies AT the game (“Dude, he wuz so safe!”) in the time it takes the runner to jog off the field.

      Yet, an official in a booth cannot watch a replay and relay the final outcome to the umps on the field in a timely manner. Really?

      I don’t understand a lot of the thinking being offered by the anti-replay crowd.

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  11. Josh says:

    The MLB should reverse the call and give him the perfect game. It was the last out of the game and the call was blown. Joyce has admitted he missed the call. It is pretty straightforward.

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  12. wobatus says:

    Why make such a big deal about this? Everyone knows he threw a “perfect” game. If Cabrera had thrown it away no one would think less of Galarraga either. It’s just that the ump made the error. He’ll be as famous as Harvey Haddix, who is more famous than Len Barker. The “record” book is meaningless. People keep it in their own minds.

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    • wobatus says:

      “Blew a spot at history.” Wrong. That’s like saying Merkle blew a spot at history by not touching first. “The list of perfect games.” Quick, name everyone on the list.

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    • Jason B says:

      Incorrect. He may have thrown a perfect game in the minds of some, but unless the call is rectified after-the-fact, then it will go down as “just” a one-hitter. Just because we wish something to be so, or “know that it should have been” so, doesn’t make it so. You can’t will the official record of the game to change just because of a poor call, regardless of its historical impact.

      We began the day with 20 perfect games in ML history. As it stands right now…we end the day with 20. Not 21, 20.999999999, or 20 1/2, but…the same list of 20.

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      • wobatus says:

        So what? History is in the minds of people. Harvey haddix isn’t on the list either, but I’ve heard of him more than I’ve heard Len Barker. I even know who got the hit: Joe Adcock. That was before I was born, over 50 years ago.

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  13. GBeck15 says:

    I’ve already decided in my mind that he threw a perfect game. I’ll just make him a little certificate and hang up in my room.

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    • Jason B says:

      Shouldn’t the certificate be in *his* room? I’m imagining your wall plastered with certificates of other people’s achievements. =)

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  14. Gary says:

    …unbelievable.
    I can’t believe Gallarraga didn’t go berserk. Missing a call like that…
    Go go Selig. Needs some record book rewriting

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    • wobatus says:

      I can. He was likely relieved and bemused. He knows what he did.

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      • Gary says:

        I don’t think you understand people at all, especially not competitors.

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      • Alex says:

        No, I don’t think you do. He knows he threw a perfect game and so does every other player in the league. Do you honestly think he cares that much about whether or not a record book says he did? Only the most vain guys

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      • Alex says:

        play for the record books. Most play for the respect of the fans and their peers.

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      • wobatus says:

        You were wondering why he didn’t react, but he was competing.

        If it was the world series, he likely would react differently.

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      • DavidK says:

        He didnt’ react because HE HIMSELF wasn’t sure if the guy was really out or safe. I just saw him being interviewed on ESPN and he said he blocked out the runner altogether and was concentrating on just catching the ball.

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      • perfectjoke says:

        Say no aggressive behavior, Big G. Just say no. Don’t blow your fuse unless you want a bruise. In your heart. Peace, G. Peace.

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      • wobatus says:

        I am talking about once he heard the call, he smiled a bemused smile. One of disappointment, but he really handled himself with grace throughout this.

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  15. nothingxs says:

    I am considering buying a Detroit Tigers shirt with “PERFECT” and Galarraga’s name on it so I won’t forget.

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    • wobatus says:

      No one will forget it. Seriously. He’s not been a great pitcher but he’ll likely be as famous as Dennis Martinez, who was a decent pitcher with a long career.

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      • Jason B says:

        I’ll take the under on Armando being as good or famous as Denny Martinez. That’s no easy feat.

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      • wobatus says:

        I am not saying he was as good, but this game alone will make him famous due to the umps blown call. Harvey haddix is likely more well known than say, Joss, who was a great pitcher who had a perfect game that “counted” in the record book. I don’t think there actually is a record book. Haddix threw a 12 innings of a perfect game and lost it in the 13th and he is famous.

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  16. Jeremy says:

    I used to be adamantly against the replay system because of how I hate football’s way; do I cheer or not? But I’d rather this get taken care of. Never again should this happen.

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  17. Michael says:

    Selig does have the power to reverse the call. The question is whether he will or not. It needs to be reversed, forget that it’s never happened before, the kid threw a perfect game, and Joyce made one of the worst calls in the history of the game to take it away from him.

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  18. Horrible call. Even if it was close, which it wasn’t, if you were Jim Joyce, wouldn’t you want to err on the side of history?

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    • cpebbles says:

      It was closer than everyone is saying. Galarraga didn’t catch the ball cleanly. He did get control it before he stepped off the bag, and then readjusted it in his glove after he came off the bag. There is simply no way Joyce is so incompetent that he thought Donald beat him to the bag, he just blew the call by interpreting it as a bobble when it was simply a near-bobble.

      Probably not a good idea to make that call in the circumstances unless it is clear as daylight, but it wasn’t as obvious as it looked on TV before ESPN finally showed the ump’s POV.

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      • Gary says:

        I don’t really blame Joyce. Maybe a bit for not erring on the side of history but this was an honest mistake. The true travesty was due to the lack of replay. And if Selig doesn’t do anything..well that’s another travesty committed.

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      • Gdiguy says:

        Joyce apparently told Leland after the call (during the argument), and has also publicly stated, that he saw Donald beat the throw, with no mention of any bobble

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      • max says:

        If he thought it was a bobble, he would have given the bobble sign, and then called safe. He just blew it, and at a bad time for everyone.

        I have always been against instant replays in baseball. Replaying HR’s is okay because the umpires are not in position to make those calls. I’m still not sure that I want umpires to have full instant replay capabilities, but this play makes the argument better than any other blown call I’ve seen.

        Deceiving the umpire should be part of the game though, like the McLouth play in the first week of the year, and stuff like that. Maybe for bang-bang plays like this, replay would be acceptable.

        But I never want instant replay, or machines, for balls and strikes. I like having strike zones change from umpire to umpire, day to day.

        I do think that Gallaraga should somehow get official credit for a perfect game, even though nothing like that has ever happened before.

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      • cpebbles says:

        Yeah, my mistake. I am floored that Joyce made that incompetent a ruling. It’s hard for me to believe even a layman would think for a second that Donald beat him to the bag, much less an umpire in good standing.

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  19. Chengy says:

    No, do not overturn the call. It may be the right thing to do but it just doesn’t seam right. If it is just a business like deal there is no point. The best part of the perfect game IMO is the end when every body on the field celebrating. Don’t make it workman like. It just doesn’t seam right.

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  20. adohaj says:

    I still don’t want instant replay. I don’t want baseball to end up like football has. The idea of a challenge in baseball is sickening. Just think if there was instant replay we wouldn’t have this article or something to talk about.

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    • Kev says:

      How has football ended up? Tremendously popular? I mean I don’t get it. Are you saying the flow is poor?

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      • adohaj says:

        It ruins the flow and excitement of the game. Picture this, your team is stringing hits together in the ninth inning to try and win the game. The rally is in full swing when it is brought to a grinding halt for instant replay. Also remember with the instant replay comes a commercial break!

        The system would be abused. Teams would “challenge” calls to give bullpen pitchers more time to warm up.

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      • DavidK says:

        They wouldn’t abuse replay if you only get two challenges per game– they wouldn’t waste one just to give their bullpen more time to warm up.

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      • JoeC says:

        Silly. If you limit the number of challenges, then blown calls like this will happen… again. So this “never again” canard will be exposed for what it is: a fraud.

        There are way too many borderline calls in baseball for pervasive replay to ever be anything other than a huge game lengthener (something baseball does not need at all) and, yes, as a momentum killer (something baseball also does not need, as the drama is about as drawn out as it can be currently and still qualify as drama).

        And this all has us hurtling towards that slippery slope of taking humans out of the business of calling balls and strikes. Why not? Isn’t it an equal travesty if Gallaraga loses the perfect game because the home plate ump calls a pitch down the middle a ball on a 3-2 count?

        You can’t say “replay is okay here, but here… oh no, we will allow human error here”. It has to be one or the other, all replay or no replay, or you’re just a hypocrite.

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      • davidk says:

        Really? How many times can you recall THREE blown calls that went against the same team in the same game?

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    • Ricky says:

      No, instead we’d have an article about how there was a perfect game thrown today, and it was by a player who was just in the minors, and it was the third already this season, and Jackson made an amazing catch to save it, and all the other details that came together to make such an improbable and amazing thing happen. Instead of focusing on the accomplishment and how it happened, though, we’re discussing a gigantic mistake.

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      • adohaj says:

        The sad part is I wouldn’t find that article interesting anymore. It seems like a perfect game happens ever other day or so.

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      • wobatus says:

        we are talking about both.

        It doesn’t only not matter that he didn’t get the perfect game in the vast scheme of things, it doesn’t even matter in the minute scheme of things. Everyone knows what he accomplished.

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    • titowa says:

      well, actually, we’d be talking about the 21st perfect game in the history of baseball.

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    • csmccorm says:

      So while we would merely be denied this article, in the world as it current exists, Galarraga was denied a perfect game. It seems to me that the disappointment suffered by the denied party in these two alternatives is strikingly asymmetrical. Justifying an injustice because it provides for interesting discussion seems pretty cold to me.

      Dave is right: Reply now. Figure out how to make it work.

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    • NoStars says:

      Picture this, your team is stringing hits together in the ninth inning to try and win the game. The rally is in full swing when it is brought to a grinding halt for a manager to run out there and argue what he perceives to be a mistake by an umpire.

      The time it takes to look at a replay will more than likely be faster than it takes Bobby Cox to get thrown out of the game.

      The system is already abused. Managers/pitching coaches go out to the mound to allow their reliever to warm up some more all the time. Lastly, instant replay in this situation wouldn’t have mattered time-wise as the game was over.

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    • TomG says:

      The only reason football replays take longer (besides a chance to sneak in a commercial or two) is that there are, in any contested play, a great many moving parts and much more complex rules/judgment calls that need to be analyzed. Baseball, on the other hand, is more simplistic in its rule structure. It shouldn’t take an ump a minute and a half to determine whether a runner beat a throw, a ball cleared a fence, or a tag was applied. Or, if it does, that ump shouldn’t be umpiring to begin with.

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  21. Ray J says:

    You’ll see worse calls this year, they just won’t come in life-altering situations.

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  22. Chuck says:

    Baseball’s best move is to say and do nothing.

    It’s obvious that Baseball and Umpires should not try to convince anyone that they believe the call was the right one. That would be ludicrous, and of course they won’t do that. But for Baseball to join the fray and start piling on Joyce and, by extension, umpires’ credibility would do nothing but create huge tensions them and Umpires. After all, Umpires needs Baseball to stand behind them to maintain their authority and credibility on the field, and Baseball needs their umpires to be respected or else the game might devolve into chaos, because players and managers won’t have any reason to respect umpires if Baseball doesn’t.

    The best thing for Baseball to do is to stay silent and let this all blow over, however long it takes (and it will take long enough). And the best thing the Umpires can do is to express empathy for their brother in arms over the next couple of days, and then go silent on it. They do any more than that for any longer than that, and it will only keep the story stoked indefinitely.

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    • tompkins says:

      I don’t see how they could pile ANYTHING onto Joyce. He said he was wrong. He apologized. Don’t you think that if he’d had the chance to review it on a teleprompter he would have? This isn’t just some routine grounder in the 4th inning of a 10 run blowout…it’s a perfect game, a chance at history. Umpires should have the ability to go to the replay if they feel it’s necessary. I don’t see how this is an issue, and I don’t see how it undermines the authority of ANY umpire. If anything it empowers them MORE. It gives them the ability to call a more accurate game, as regulated by the rules of baseball. That is their job, to enforce the rules of the game. Jim Joyce did not do that. He did not enforce the rule. He failed as an umpire. Plain and simple, and he admitted to it. He, along with every other umpire out there should have every chance to redeem themselves and make the correct call, for the sake of the sport, the players, the fans, and themselves. End of story. If you think instant replays will ruin the game of baseball you are not someone who appreciates the game, you are a delusional fanatic. Period.

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  23. Bill Peper says:

    Joyce did not call it a bobble. He thought the runner beat the throw — how he could have possibly thought that is a mystery for the ages. he admitted the mistake after the game.

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  24. Kool says:

    Sabotage. Someone’s making the wrong calls. They made up for it tonight by ruining young Armando’s chance at perfection. However, I did not come here to comment on that. I think people make a perfect game sound better than it really is. Dallas Braden pitched great but I’d say that Matt Cain pitched better in his start against the Nationals last week. The only blemishes were a double and a HBP. However, he had nearly twice as many Ks as Braden did in his perfect game and he did not rely on the defense as much. However, I am not trying to downplay the greatness of Dallas’ game either. A win is a win. Some look prettier than others.

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    • Mister Delaware says:

      I don’t think anyone is contending this would have been (or was) a top 21 pitching performance ever, just that its so crazy rare and thus a huge deal.

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  25. Tony says:

    It absolutely broke my heart when I saw it. Even if it had been another team it would have been heart breaking, but as a die hard Tigers fan, it was especially upsetting. No one in Tigers history had ever thrown a Perfect Game before tonight.

    I really do hope that Bud overturns the call and gives Armando what he deserved.

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  26. Mister Delaware says:

    Selig stopped the ASG and more or less said he wasn’t going to let the ’08 World Series end on a rain called game. There is some precedent for him taking action in an outlier circumstance like this.

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  27. Alex B. says:

    Precedents be damned, that was a perfect game and everyone knows it. May the writers of the history books agree.

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  28. Steven Gomez says:

    The funny thing about this travesty is that it may have done more to immortalize Armando Gallaraga than getting the perfect game would have, especially if this blown call is the spark that produces full blown instant replay. He could be to MLB replay what Curt Flood was to MLB free agency.

    In any case, Gallaraga will forever be remembered for being the guy who had a perfect game ripped from him on a horrible umpire call, cracked a ‘what can you do’ smile and finished the game off anyway. Not to in any way demean Len barker, Dennis Martinez, Kenny Rogers, Mark Buehrle, Dallas Braden, Roy Halladay and anyone else who has ever thrown a perfecto. Their moments of immortality, for any memories people carry of their moment in history, are all thrown together on a list. Gallaraga’s game will stand out the way Harvey Haddix’s 12 perfect innings stand out, as a performance that belongs on that immortal scale but was denied a place on the list due to bizarre circumstances.

    Armando Gallaraga didn’t need no stinking perfect game. He claimed his place in history today. And he was all smiles even after Joyce screwed him on that call.

    Speaking of which, kudos to Gallaraga for playing it totally cool when it happened, and finishing the game. He handled that moment better than I could imagined anyone doing so.

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    • wobatus says:

      Exactly.

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    • DavidK says:

      As I said above, probably the only reason he played it cool was because he didn’t realize that the guy was safe at the time. He had totally blocked out the runner when he was concentrating on catching the ball.

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      • A DC Wonk says:

        “As I said above, probably the only reason he played it cool was because he didn’t realize that the guy was safe at the time.”

        But it’s *still* impressive. Suppose he actually thought he legitimately lost the perfect game on the 27th batter. And still he smiled and shrugged and got the next guy out. Most pitchers are pretty bummed when they lose a no-hitter, all the more so a perfecto, in the 9th.

        Galaraga deserves kudos both for his pitching performance and how he handled himself (and how he continues to handle himself)

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    • Steven Gomez says:

      Thanks, guys, and BTW I’ve got to apologize for misspelling Galarraga’s name a few times. I doubled the wrong letter.

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  29. Matt Defalco says:

    A-MEN.

    100% true. Replay needs to be added, and they should hold a press conference to overturn the call and make it a perfect game.

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  30. Shaggychild says:

    Not to discredit Armando, but if you give him this perfect game, you might as well take away Halladay’s. Roy walked some guys according to the rule book’s strike zone, but the ump ‘blew’ those calls.

    This is indeed a travesty, but that’s the way it will be written.

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  31. Treize Khushrenada says:

    Instant replay extending to calls other than Home Runs should not even be in this discussion. This is a one time screw up that should be corrected for posterity on a one time basis. This incident does not strengthen the argument for Replay. Like the poster above said, the Commish of baseball can do whatever he wants. Selig should use his authority to overturn that ruling and give Galarraga his perfect game. Instant replay on calls other than HRs would slow the game even worse than it is.

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    • Jason B says:

      Yeah, that extra fifteen seconds added to a 2 1/2 hour affair would be *EXCRUCIATING!!!*

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      • Jeff says:

        well this was a 1 hour and 44 minute affair…

        I was at BBQ for a birthday and was going inside to watch the tigers bat and going out to be at the party while they pitched…that was until i heard “15 up and 15 down” as I walked in at the end of the 5th…

        I was so upset when I saw Joyce make the safe call… it was game 163 all over again… heartbreaking…

        I hope Bud Selig does the right thing… Galarraga could not have been more gracious in his post game interviews… He deserves it…

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    • Jason B says:

      Not saying there may not be legitimate reasons to be against expanded use of replay, that is just one that is so very, very easy to swat away. In the time it takes for a manager to huff, puff, and get thrown out, a close call can be checked and corrected (if needed). Limit it to, say, one challenge each per game.

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  32. dlb says:

    In all of this, we’ve found another use for the asterisk! Put it next to Gallaraga with a footnote:

    “*Umpire blew call on final out to nullify perfect game.”

    The best part of all of this is Gallaraga saying, ironically (in regard to the Ump), “nobody’s perfect.”

    Oh, man….

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  33. BJsWorld says:

    Replay sucks. It is so much better to preserve the integrity of the game and GET CALLS WRONG then to take advantage of technology and get things right. I just don’t get that rationale.

    Commonly stated myths:

    1. Replays take too long. Nope. In the NFL they take too long. You can easily cap the time it takes, especially if there is a replay official. No more than 1 minute per call. If you can’t tell in one minute then the play stands. And honestly in most games you are talking about 1 or 2 calls total. BTW – that’s LESS time than is spent arguing between coaches/players and umps.

    2. Replays will take over the game. Nope. Balls and strikes stay clearly in the realm of an umpires discretion. Virtually everything else is easily checked with replays. I would make it so that replays are called by the umpires. If the ump is absolutely convinced that he got it right then it doesn’t get replayed. Of course, he will live with the shame of blowing a call and ignoring the replay if he is too stubborn to use the system in situations where the play requires a more careful look.

    3. Having replays would rarely change the outcome. Absolutely false. Anyone who watched the AL playoff games knows that a certain team from NY had a great streak of good luck when it came to blown calls. Whether it was fair balls called foul or too many baserunners standing on 3rd. There were a good 5 or 6 plays that absolutely changed the outcome of playoff games last year.

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    • Bill@TDS says:

      +1000 to all of this…except I’d just as soon we have the computer call balls and strikes too. That’s the part of their jobs the umps are worst at.

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      • Doug Lampert says:

        And having the computer call Balls and Strikes SPEEDS UP the game.

        The call can be relayed from the booth every bit as fast as it can be made on the field, and you reduce the arguments.

        If I understand things correctly, the top and the bottom of the zone are human input to the computer for each batter, so we can even still have wierd strike zones and bad human judgment if you INSIST that’s part of the game too. Just a lot less of it and a lot more consistency about it.

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  34. r.w.g. says:

    Cricket has had a third, off-field replay umpire for years.

    It works pretty well for close run-outs, leg before wickets, some tough to see boundary calls, etc.

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  35. DJ says:

    Yes, Armando pitched a perfect game.

    Yes, the umpire blew the call.

    But this is Baseball.

    In golf, they call it the “rub of the green”.

    Ever hear of Roberto? No, not Clemente… DiVicenzo?

    Life isn’t fair, perfect or even neat and clean.

    It’s dirty and messy in the best of times. But systems and rules exist… for a reason.

    As a Quality Engineer tasked with finding ways of correcting future errors in advance (using preventive rather than prophylactic thinking), I see thousands of cases in everyday societal ills that scream for a better mechanism to insure justice, even retroactively applied.

    But this… it’s just… Baseball.

    We can redefine any rules of any sport we want to, based on the passions of a single example.

    Now, I’m no fan of the leadership in MLB historically… Baseball screwed up huge in dozens of ways over the last 5 decades.

    The Montreal Expos.

    The Designated Hitter.

    Steroids in the Clubhouse.

    Bud Selig.

    But Baseball is… Umpires. Always has been. Always should be.

    Umpires are key in the game, from sandlots thru the Bigs. Don’t undercut that…

    I’m a Tiger’s fan, and I like the kid Gallaraga. His sophmore season was a heartache. Glad to see him back on top.

    But it’s… Baseball.

    Umpires already have a tough enough job. Don’t take away or compromise the real basis of the game (instant authoritative human decision making) without realizing what you give up…

    And how far do you go with this “corrective vigilantism”?

    Remember the Cubs fan who interfered? You want to reverse that result too?
    Now?

    How about Sparky coming out of the Dugout to argue calls at third? Maybe the Tigers should be credited for 17 more wins from 1979 to 1998? By my count, Sparky was right 132 times during that period, and I’m sure Tom Tango can manipluate that data into 17 more WEBOTS (Wins Expected Based On Tango Says-so).

    So, my appeal to those who would passionately and righteously steal from Baseball what is it’s greatest asset… the System of the Umpire.

    Compromise that, and the slippery slope awaits.

    Congratulations Armando. And history will more remember your achievement BECAUSE of the blown call.

    -12 Vote -1 Vote +1

    • Kev says:

      “It’s dirty and messy in the best of times. But systems and rules exist… for a reason.”

      How can you even believe this? We don’t have replay in baseball because we didn’t have replay at all in 1880 or whenever the hell the rule book was written. You can’t tell me that tennis, which is an older sport than baseball with more skittish rules about tradition, form, and presentation (hello Wimbeldon outfit restrictions), can adopt technology with absolutely no drawbacks and yet baseball would struggle to do so.

      It just doesn’t add up. People offering the equivalent of “just deal with it” need to take a long walk off a short pier. It’s embarrassing.

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      • bberdl20 says:

        I think there is a major difference between changing the system starting now or starting in 2011 and changing this call after the fact. I would not at all be opposed to changing the rules going forward, but going back and changing an already made call is going too far.

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    • DavidK says:

      So just because there are some aspects of baseball that you don’t deem as “perfect” means you shouldn’t strive to make the game as good as possible? What a ridiculous argument. OK, if you want the game to be IMPERFECT, I have a few ideas you might like:

      1) blindfold the umpires
      2) have bats with big holes in the center of them
      3) ditto for gloves
      4) Allow the foul lines to be moved at random from batter to batter
      5) strew large rocks at random all over the infield

      You get the idea

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      • DJ says:

        DavidK makes a ludicrous comment to take on a sensible position, preserving the system of Umpire… and needs to create a strawman to do it.

        Who says I am trying to make the game “imperfect”? Putting a smokescreen up doesn’t help, so don’t try it when confronted by logic…

        So let’s make Baseball perfect… like say… the direction that David Stern takes NBA Basketball!

        Home teams will win most games far beyond reason!
        Fans will go home happier more often!
        The Star handpicked players will get ALL the calls!
        Big Market TV market teams will ALWAYS advance in playoffs!
        Marketing will be in advance of Results! Causation!
        Lakers will meet Celtics in Finals!
        Pistons will be banished to the cellar… BAD Bad Boys!

        Do YOU work for David Stern, DavidK?

        So… Don’t think I’m unfair assuming this of you? How do you like it?

        Try using logic in return, not misdirection tricks. I’ll argue facts with one who does likewise. Try tricks elsewhere.

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      • davidk says:

        The arguing technique I used is called “reducing to the absurd”, which is what I did to your “argument” that you should leave the game imperfect, well, just BECAUSE. If you don’t understand my argument, PLEASE take a Logic 101 class.

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      • davidk says:

        DJ., so seriously, are you not for ANY improvement in technology to make the game better just because we hadn’t done it that way before? Shoudl we go back to the old style fielder’s mitts, or for that matter, allow players to leave their mitts ON THE FIELD after the third out (yes, they used to do this)? Should we remove the lights from all stadiums and play only day games? The list goes on and on, and the point is that times change, and the game should change with the times. You really have made NO argument to support your position, as much as you like to think that you’ve supported your position with “logic”.

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    • Bill@TDS says:

      Lots of words to basically say “we’ve always had umpires, so we always should have umpires.” Full of fail. Baseball has never been even remotely “about” umpires. We have them because they used to be necessary. Would have made just as much sense to say “Baseball is… day games” when light towers started going up, or “Baseball is…radio” when TV came along. Silly.

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    • Rich says:

      :”But systems and rules exist… for a reason.”

      Yeah, and they weren’t followed last night. The rules say that Gallaraga got an out on that play.

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  36. DJ says:

    So, Kev, by your way of thinking, this issue is so important to you that disagreeing with your particular bias deserves one a call to suicide… (long walk…)…

    Wow. couldn’t prove my point any better.

    It’s … Baseball.

    Correct Obama getting elected without a valid BC, and then get back to me.

    -15 Vote -1 Vote +1

  37. Frank says:

    Bud should just come out and fix this. The precedence of changing the call might get a bit gummy but leaving what happened, as is, isn’t a better alternative. You can’t have an umpire not stand by his own call and Joyce himself has freely admitted to blowing it. We’re sitting on an aberration of history which can be easily changed. This game and the 85′ World Series game are apples and oranges. They can not be compared to one another and as such, you can change the former without changing the latter.

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  38. shashi says:

    Please, please separate this situation from a discussion about expanding replay. Armando graciously accepted Joyce’s face to face apology. If it’s enough for him it should be enough for us.

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  39. frank says:

    I wonder if the author of the article would like to see baseball overturn the last 2 runs and restore Carmona’s pitching line to just 1 ER (instead of 2ER + 1 unearned)…those runs were also the result of a blown call at first with 2 out in the 8th on a Damon grounder.

    I mean if baseball is going to retroactively go back and clean up the records, might as well clean up both blown calls in this game right? It’s not like changing the Damon infield single to an out and wiping out the next 2 AB’s by the Tigers will change the outcome of the game, right?

    What if it was a blown call on a cycle? A rare 5 double game? Is the cleaning up of blown calls relegated to perfect games? What if it was “just” a no hitter? What if it happened with 1 out in the 9th? What if it happened in the 4th inning?

    The outrage over this is ridiculous… it’d be one thing if changed the outcome of the game and was the difference between a win or loss, but we’re talking about a one hitter vs a no hitter.

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    • DJ says:

      Amen Frank.

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    • kgm says:

      In the end, Frank makes the right point with regards to this particular game. Umpires blow calls all the time, but no one complains about 75% of the calls because they don’t affect the outcome of the game. You can’t reasonably go back and alter this game without altering every other missed call.

      Which is all the more reason to champion instant replay of some kind…there is no excuse, in 2010, for not having every call reflect the reality of what happens on the field rather than what occurs in an umpire’s head.

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      • Bill@TDS says:

        There’s just no reason not to change this one. It ended the game — there is 0 uncertainty about what would have happened thereafter. And it changes nothing about the actual outcome of the game. It is, for all intents and purposes, a clerical error. The people who are complaining about changing this one when we don’t change other stuff are going way overboard.

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      • Rich says:

        Why not?

        We convict people of crimes despite the fact that we can’t reasonably be expected to convict everyone who commits a crime.

        Shouldn’t we just disband our whole justice system? There’s no way for it to be perfect.

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      • CircleChange11 says:

        I have no idea why baseball rejects technological advances that can quickly & easily improve the accuracy of the game.

        If other fields and professions were to reject technology in a similar manner, we’d all been calling our lawyers.

        Yet, we care just as much, if not more, about baseball (because we’re goofy) than we do many other fields of study, including those that deal with public health, safety, and education.

        Like I said in another post, it’s essentially “malpractice”. And malpractice doesn’t simply mean “poor performance”, it is implied that it is willfully using inferior methods even though much improved methods/materials are available and within a reasonable cost.

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  40. shashi says:

    Expanding replay in baseball is beyond complex. 2 outs in the ninth with a runner on second. Batter loops a ball into right where the fielder makes a diving catch. Runner between 3rd and home sees the out call and peels off into foul territory to collect his glove to go out for the bottom of the ninth. Batter stopped running before he got to first. Replay shows the ball was trapped. What the heck do you do now? We could create scenarios all day with incorrect dead ball situations with no obvious or consistent remedy. This is a trivial one. Make up your own for the myriad routine “reviewable” plays that we see in EVERY game. It’s imperfect as is, but more perfect than replay will allow.

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    • DJ says:

      Shashi sees it clearly enough…

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    • frank says:

      It’s the same problem on fair/foul… you’re replacing the subjectivity of making the first call with the subjectivity of predicting where the runners would have ended up.

      The HR/interference call at least has finality and outside of the possibility of balls not clearing the wall be turned into ground rule doubles (instead of potentially being a triple), there isn’t a lot of subjectivity on an overturn.

      I suggest that like the HOF there should be a cooling off period (lets say 1 month) before people churn up the outrage machine to change the rules of the game. The prisoner of the moment mentality in society does not always lend itself to rationale decision making.

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      • Cronus says:

        So your argument is that since you can’t logically (or I supposed ethically) fix everything, your next best option would then to be fix nothing? That’s a fallacy my friend. You’re ignoring the obvious exception in front of you.

        However I’m inclined to agree people are trapped in the moment, but that’s an irreverent to the overall argument. If you want to wait a month, does it still change anything? Will cooler heads show the call was correct or that changing the call would result in some negative loophole to be exploited? Perhaps something does change, or as you hinted at, people will just stop caring as hard.

        But, and this is a big but, not caring and being ultimately right are two separate things.

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      • frank says:

        I’m suggesting that with some time and perhaps a bit of perspective folks will realize this call had less of an impact on the actual game (that is what we’re worried about right?) than a call that happened 20minutes earlier in the same game.

        I think this is more outrage over record book keeping as opposed to outrage over a call impacting the outcome of a game (and I realize not everyone fits in that category). Waiting a month might separate out the emotion over “missing history” with a rationale discussion of whether replay would result in getting a ”truer” outcome of a game. (I think this is not as clear cut as everyone seems to think it is)

        The problem is I haven’t heard a good solution for dealing with runners on base and I wonder if umpires will become like the football refs. When the call is close they will typically err on the side of letting the play go and then “fixing it” via replay. If they call the play dead it runs into all sorts of problems (take the fumble vs down by contact call as an example) – that then effectively puts a bias into how the game is called real time.

        This would normally not be a problem but if you have some language like “conclusive or indisputable evidence”, then a marginal call that an umpire let’s go so the play is played out may not end up being overturned and now you have very subtlely introduced a bias into the officiating/umpiring.

        And if it’s about getting close to ideal, then balls and strikes has a much, much greater impact on the game then the occasional blown call in the field. It’s not about not caring or only doing something when everything can be fixed, it’s about wondering whether the solution is actually better and better enough to outweigh any negative impacts.

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      • Cronus says:

        I guess I have to pull a Jim Joyce and admit that I didn’t understand your argument. I thought you were calling the movement for Bud Selig to overturn the games verdict to be reactionary rather then instituting a replay system to be such. I suppose you might consider both to be, but that’s another argument for another time.

        I agree that a broad use of the replay system wouldn’t bring a truer outcome to the game then compared to the narrow use of it currently. Your examples of base runners on trap-balls is spot on. And I’d venture to say that there will never be an adequate solution to this problem with regards to replays.

        I see this situation that unfolded yesterday as two entirely different problems. There is problem A, which is what’s going to happen to Joyce because of this call and problem B, the overall call to use a replay system because of what happened.

        There is a large outcry for Joyce to be suspended (and even fired) for his call. I’m not sure why someone would call for that, but regardless it’s stupid to call for. Yes, the umpire made a mistake on a potentially historic game, but calling for him to sit because of a blown call is just silly. I’m sure it’s a product of bloodlust. And for some reason baseball fans take things very personally… They don’t forget too much of anything. Case in point: Steve Bartman and all those fans that heckled Barry Bonds when BALCO was being investigated. Jim Joyce doesn’t deserve the grief he’s going to get for what happened. Even admitting to the bad call will not grant him immunity. Rather then allowing ill-feelings to stir over something that Joyce himself is kicking himself over. I believe Bud Selig should just fix the record books. It’s not as if we haven’t seen something like that anyways with 61*. It’ll save him from the grief from the fans and himself. Listening to his discussion of the call on the Ticket was a bit heart wrenching.

        However, I agree with you that the call for replays is premature and would replace problems with the game rather then correcting them. It’s easier for football to institute a working replay system then it would be for baseball. Baseball might have to live with the fallibility of umpires rather then seeking a solution which as a football fan, still isn’t without its setbacks. The scope of which baseball fans are asking the replay system to be expanded into is probably improbable. You’re right that there is no way to adequately place base runners in questionable situations. And as such, if people are set in adding a replay system it shouldn’t look into replaying if a player traps a ball or catches it with regards to men on base. It should become a un-reviewable call. If people are set on an addition to the replay system, add to what can be ultimately determined. Review if a player is safe at first, review if a player catches a ball or traps it with bases empty, and other things that are escaping my mind at the moment.

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      • frank says:

        Both are reactionary… but having Selig invoke a best interest of the game clause for some personal accomplishment is just plain silly.

        But if people think this is correct I would like to point out that in 1970 Roberto Clemente got a favorable safe call at first and should have finished with 2999 career hits. Since the 3000hit club is about as exclusive as the perfect game club, I hope there is an outcry for Selig to get right on fixing that wrong too…

        As for replay – I’m all in favor of looking at widening the use of replay but I don’t think that issues like how to handle runners on base of overturned calls has been though out and fear the knee jerk reaction to a call which had zero impact on a game will lead to a poor system being put in place.

        Heck the call in the bottom of the 10th of the SEA-MIN game tonight was far more impactful… a safe call on a force out (on what should have been the 3rd out) allowed the winning run score. This was pretty much the inverse of what I fear – a guy from 2nd came around to score when a force out at 2nd was called safe…. if the exact opposite occurred (the out was call and the runner at 2nd turned out to be safe), what would you do with the runner rounding 3rd? He goes back to 3rd since everyone stopped when the out was ruled? Or is it up to the umps to guess whether he would have made it or whether it would have been a good throw to the plate or whether the catcher would have held the ball if there was a collision.

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      • Another Frank says:

        I actually don’t really agree with either Frank or frank.

        The game should stand as called. Sure, give Galarraga an asterisked perfect game, but it’s not quite the same.

        Also, the point with replay isn’t to be a perfect solution, but to GET THE CALL RIGHT. Do people really think that because an umpire made a “certain” call, that makes it the correct call, even if it’s provably wrong?

        Do people really worry that since instant replay can’t supply the “exact correct solution,” that we should just settle for the MOST incorrect solution?

        What type of “logic” is that?

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      • Cronus says:

        Again you’re regressing into the fallacy. What happened to Clemente doesn’t change what should happen here. Just because we’ve seen situations that haven’t been overturned, doesn’t mean this one shouldn’t be. When you’re presented a prime opportunity to fix something, you do it. You don’t simply because there has been times where you haven’t before.

        It goes something like this: “There has been bad calls in the game before that weren’t changed. This was a bad call. We shouldn’t turn over this call because there has been bad calls before.” Do you honestly agree with that?

        Perfect games are by no means an expression of a personal achievement, unless the pitcher strikes out all 27 batters. Then you can go ahead and say it was a personal achievement. For some odd reason people think when a pitcher pitches a perfect game it’s all because of him, the same when it comes to football and winning. When you win, the quarterback gets ultimate credit. Both philosophies of thought are wrong. This entire argument becomes mute of Austin Jackson doesn’t run down the first out in the 9th.

        I recall game 163 between the Tigers and Twins and the pitch that grazed Brandon Inge’s jersey. Of course the HBP wasn’t called and it could have impacted the entire game for Detroit (whom we all know eventually lost the game). The blame of the loss could be placed on the umpire, but that would be unfair. The entire game lead up to that moment where the Tigers had several chances to take care of the game and didn’t. I didn’t get to see a great view of the call by the umpire in the Seattle game tonight, so I can’t speak too much on that. But regardless of the call at second, it’s still not the exception. We have infallible proof of what happened to Armando, we have a situation were we can easily overturn the original call without influencing the games actual outcome, and we have the power to do it. How can you put a good argument together against this? I’d really like to see it, because I honestly don’t understand how you could be against this.

        The only exception we’re being presented with tonight is what happened with Joyce and Galarraga. We fix what we can, and we don’t what we can’t. It’s as simple as that.

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      • frank says:

        We shouldn’t change the call after the fact because it doesn’t impact the outcome of the game… go back to my point of Carmona taking a hit because of a blown call in the same game… should he have an earned run taking off his record? That should be corrected real time as well, no? Galaragga gets this courtesy, but Carmona, who was in the same exact situation (except for the whole no hitter thing), doesn’t?

        What if Carmona goes on to string together a bunch of scoreless innings and falls just short of Orel’s consecutive scoreless innings record? We easily could have fixed that realtime by Selig fixing the obvious blown call in the 8th on Damon. It has no impact on the outcome of the game – why not get that right too and make the final score 1-0 like it ‘should’ have been if called correctly. All he has to do is credit Damon with the groundout he should have had and wipe out the last 2 AB’s for Detroit.

        I mean if you’re going to retroactively fix the last out of the 9th, why not fix the last out of the Tiger’s bottom of the 8th? Same situation – there were no future Detroit innings/hitters to worry about…

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      • Cronus says:

        If you want to make that argument, then go for it. I can say that if you do, I’ll agree with you. But I’m not here to discuss that and you brining it up is just a red herring.

        If you want to take the effort to make an argument that Carmona should be credited with a single earned run, go for it. I’m not stopping you nor am I disagreeing with you. However, you make a statement against correcting the call against Armando without addressing it.

        Again, do you agree that the call shouldn’t be overturned simply because history has been full of bad calls?

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      • Jim Joyce says:

        It’s not a red herring… no call should be retroactively changed (via commish intervention)… whether it’s the last out of a perfect game or a “meaningless” ER in a 9-1 game. My point remains the 8th inning call was far more important to the game outcome and yet noone seems to care.

        Circumstances should not dictate the changing of a call… it didn’t impact the outcome of the game so why change something retroactively? (Again, I’m talking about the commish changing it after the fact, not replay)

        Should replay dictate fixing the call? The answer is also no – it’s an all or none thing for me, and that includes balls and strikes if you’re going to do replay *which is far more important than an occasional blown call in the field) and none of this challenge garbage.

        If the argument for replay is to get it right than it should be use in an UNLIMITED manner on ALL plays in all circumstances. If the idea is to correct an incorrect call, we should correct all incorrect calls.

        This was a meaningless call that had zero impact on the game outcome (even looking at it real time, the odds of any team scoring 3 runs with 2 out and a runner on first is pretty low) – it’s only magnified through the emotional prism of a missed perfect game. Their is no outrage on the 8th inning call or the far more impactful call in SEA-MIN game or a key ball/strike call in just about EVERY game.

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      • Another Frank says:

        I still don’t understand the type of arguments that come out about from people like Jim Joyce…. Haven’t they blown enough calls already?

        1) The argument that you either have “all” or “none” for instant replay is a completely false dichotomy. The point is to create a better experience for everyone involved, and most (but NOT all) of that is related to getting the call right, especially in egregious cases.

        2) Just because in an IDEAL world, we have replay for EACH call, doesn’t mean that it’s feasible. To go to hyperbolic extremes, who wants to sit at a game that takes your whole lifetime to play out to ensure the correctness of the game? This is just picking low hanging fruit to get egregious wrong calls, right.

        3) Some people (including myself) ARE outraged by the 8th inning issue and the SEA-MIN blown call. These are the type of things which instant replay will help with. These calls are in fact the reason why some people have been calling for instant replay for a long time. To ignore that, and paint all “supporters” with a broad brush as “only enraged by a meaningless call” is ignoring a significant amount of evidence to the contrary.

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      • PeteJohn says:

        You tell the umpires that, when there’s a fair/foul ball that’s really close you always call it fair and let the play play out. Then you go to the replay official (which is how it should be, it’d take 30 seconds) who reviews the play and allows it to stand or calls it a foul ball.

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    • Kevin S. says:

      Actually, there’s an easy fix there. The runner stops moving when the umpire signals out, right? He’s awarded the next base. No subjectivity.

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      • frank says:

        So a guy leading off 3rd would be awarded home if a line drive hit to an infielder was ruled to be trapped instead of caught on the fly.

        You’re right about the no subjectivity part… but shouldn’t there be a logic component too?

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    • Rich says:

      Runner is out. He left the field of play.

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  41. Frank says:

    Whoa my fellow frank there is more then just a 1 hit shout out against a perfect game up here. Rod Allen nailed it in the post game, 1 hit shout outs aren’t much compared to perfect games when it comes to contract talks.

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    • frank says:

      Then might as well fix Carmona’s ERA which is also being inflated due to the blown call in the 8th right? If not for the missed call at first it’s a 1-0 game and Carmona’s #’s (WHIP, ERA, etc) looks better come his contract reneg time. By the way how much extra does a perfect game get you come contract negotiations (extra 1mil/yr?)

      I really hope my fellow frank was being sarcastic….

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  42. DJ says:

    Before asking Bud Selig to “fix this”, try asking MLB owners to “fix” Bud Selig.

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  43. Craig Tyle says:

    No doubt Selig can, and should, overturn it. He declared an All-Star game a tie — this is more important.

    Only effect is that Trevor Crowe loses an at bat.

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  44. Reuben says:

    I’m pretty sure he will be remembered. He’ll likely be more remembered as the guy who lost a perfect game due to a bad call then he would have been being the third guy who got a perfect game in like a month.

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  45. Circlechange11 says:

    While we’re reversing calls and outcomes, can I request Don Denkinger’s blow call in game 6 of the 1985 World Series. Much bigger blown call than the one today and perhaps even more obvious.

    It is too late to have a World Series parade 25 years later?

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    • joe says:

      I’ll have to invoke the “rarity” clause of record book cleansing.

      Let’s have a little perspective…. perfect games are far more rare than World Series! (and more important to the sport)

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      • Jason B says:

        Perfect games = far more rare? Yes. More important to the sport? Not even close. The champion of an entire season >>> the individual winner of a single game (even if it’s a perfect one!).

        The perfect game impacts two teams for one game, and it would have had the same impact to their record whether the score was a 1-0 perfect game, or a 10-3 snoozefest. The champion reigns supreme over the whole sport until they’re replaced next season (assuming the are).

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  46. Jay says:

    I’m an Indians fan, and I completely agree with David’s comment about revising the game in the books. It’s a very unique case where all the interested parties almost certainly would agree — even Jason Donald, who would lose the hit and maybe five points off his rookie batting average.

    This may seem at first blush like a slippery slope, but it isn’t one. No doubt other perfect games in progress have been affected by a bad call, but not on the 27th and final out. In any other hypothetical case, there’s no way to know that a perfect game necessarily would have been completed absent the bad call. When the blown call costs the pitcher the final, 27th consecutive out, however, we know for a certainty that the bad call prevented the perfect game, not merely that it might have.

    Selig should correct the record books on this.

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  47. Circlechange11 says:

    If there was better technology available in other professions but was not being used, the term to describe it would be “malpractice”. Too much consideration being given as to how people feel about it versus getting the most efficient and accurate result.

    How would people feel about their bonus, raise, promotion, award, etc being nullified by an accounting error or typo? Not so ho-hum would be my guess.

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  48. dcrowell says:

    I think it is very silly to be talking about changing outcomes after the game so everybody can get the thrill of another perfect game. Jesu Cristo. As if baseball isn’t already contrived enough with relievers running in from the bullpen with their own theme music playing, pink bats on mother’s day, and everyone wearing number 42 on April 15th to gloss over the institutional racism that marred the game before and after Jackie.

    Really it’s supposed to be about the game and who wins. Big freaking deal about the perfect game. Sorry, I just have to weigh in after seeing all this pained hand-wringing and howls for reform.

    I think Jim Joyce should stop being so hard on himself. It looks like it was kind of a bang-bang play, and I can see how he’d miss it. It certainly was a lot closer than the Denkinger call.

    There’s an oil spill in the gulf that they can’t stop.

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  49. DJ says:

    So let’s just dump Umpires altogether…

    Remember the sandlot games we played as kids?

    “he’s out!” … “no, he’s safe!”

    Followed by a rhubarb, and the fat rich kid going home and taking his ball with him.

    So today, the fat rich kid will bring his Mom, with a camcorder…

    Some justice.

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  50. MdW says:

    Full-time employees sometimes get a little high-handed with their suggestions.

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  51. I’m appalled at how shitty this thread got. Those who are against instant-replay have created some truly interesting reasons to support what is simple stubborness and rejection of change.

    I do not understand this.

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    • wobatus says:

      Ease up, dude. This one is easy to reverse. What about guy at first, sinking liner to the gap, ump say caught, guy at first goes back to first. Replay shows it was likely trapped. Now you have to figure out where the guy at first would have ended up, and where the batter would end up. Or say the guy tags up and then gets in a run down. But the ball was trapped, he didn’t need to tag, but no one told him he couldn’t just advance freely.

      But I guess that’s better than just going with the wrong call. I’m just thinking people opposed aren’t necessarily just being stubborn because they disagree with you. I made the “too much time” argument myself but retracted that, at least as far as this perfect game.

      Personally, I don’t really care all that much. Wouldn’t make me feel the purity of the game has been spoiled.

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      • Bill@TDS says:

        umpires make subjective determinations about “what would have happened” quite a bit — if an overthrow goes into the stands, for instance. A bit of potential uncertainty in which base a guy goes to every now and then is a very small price to pay for near 100% certainty in whether he was safe or out to begin with.

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      • wobatus says:

        I suppose. Yes, ump do make subjective decisions all the time. balls and strikes, etc. And subjective decisions can be wrong. I just don’t know that people arguing against at are merely being stubborn or making shitty arguments. People just aren’t all of the same mind on it..

        Actually, if a guy thinks a ball is caught, the ump initially agrees, and he tags up and gets caught in a rundown, and the ball is ultimately ruled to have been trapped, he likely should be called out anyway.

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  52. Bryz says:

    Dave, if we’re going to allow MLB to reverse a bad call to give Galarraga a perfect game, then as a Twins fan, I want that bad call that ended the Twins-Mariners game in the bottom of the 10th reversed as well.

    I really wish Galarraga had gotten the perfect game, but if we reverse a call just to allow him to make history, then others (like I just did above) will demand the same happens for “little” things like the winner and loser of a single game.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • “I want that bad call that ended the Twins-Mariners game in the bottom of the 10th reversed as well.”

      As a Mariner’s fan, I have one thing to say:

      FINE! If that meant having Instant Replay in the game, then I’m MORE than happy to reverse this stuff and pick it up where we left off. I want the games decided by the players, not by the umpires!

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    • Bill@TDS says:

      Bryz, people can demand whatever they want (and always do). Bud doesn’t have to listen to them. This is just obviously a one-and-done thing, and it would be very easy for Bud to make it come out that way.

      And as a fellow Twins fan, I don’t want that call reversed (part of what makes the Galarraga one so easy is that it DIDN’T affect the outcome in any way) — I just want instant replay immediately so it doesn’t happen again.

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  53. algionfriddo says:

    The last play of the game tonight… Minn. @ Sea. Another blown call that gave Seattle the win.

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  54. Ben Hall says:

    Small quibble, Dave. Joyce has umpired two World Series and nine other playoff series. Though perfect games are much more rare, even the first game of a division series is more important, in my opinion. Certainly a World Series game.

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  55. A DC Wonk says:

    I think one of the arguments here is *not* “because there were other blown calls we shouldn’t overturn this on after the fact.” Rather it’s: “if this call is retroactively changed, then, to be fair, which other one’s should be changed.” I.e., what’s the criteria for changing a result after the game is finished?

    That doesn’t sound so easy.

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    • Bill@TDS says:

      Dave suggests the answer, I think: none. Nothing quite like this has ever happened before or is likely to ever happen again (and if it does, we should have replay by then).

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  56. Joe R says:

    I got home last night from work to see this.
    It simply blew my mind.

    Jerry Crasnick, who’s normally good, made the weird point that it wouldn’t matter if we had replay because a replay booth trip and subsequent out call wouldn’t be as special. I was like “…huh?”

    Galarraga got jobbed. Hard. And I hope MLB does take an unprecedented move to overturn an ump’s call and award him a perfect game. Because, well, he achieved it.

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    • anon says:

      Yeah, Crasnick’s reasoning is BS. Hockey fans go nuts when a ref signals goal after a review. It creates a lot of suspense. The fans would’ve gone nuts too if Joyce walked back onto the field after hearing the call from the replay booth and signaling “out.”

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  57. Rich says:

    If force-outs at 1st are ever made subject to review, I’m out. I mean, it still wouldn’t be as bad as stopping a football game for 10 minutes and debating whether he had “control” of the ball, but it’d be close (“Does a snow cone count as control? Can he make a baseball move?”). Seriously, these plays happen ALL THE TIME. At the very least, there would be a million caveats to replay and lord knows it’s caused almost as many problems as it’s solved in football. The other sports (including baseball) are doing it right:extremely limited use.

    Galarraga did get jobbed… oh well… that’s life. Get over it.

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  58. wobatus says:

    I am kind of wondering why Joyce wouldn’t give the benefit of any doubt to the pitcher. It was bang-bang, but hard to believe he was certain the runner beat it. We’ve all seen many closer plays which are inconclusive on replay. This was pretty clear, albeit we have the benefit of watching it slo-mo.

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  59. Cap' n Obvious says:

    Did I miss something? I’m pretty sure Detroit still won the game despite the blown call. As far as I can tell the “outcome” of the game was unchanged.

    All of this clamoring for change just so some guy can get his name in the record book? Big F’ing deal. Does he have a perfect game clause in his contract? I’d be willing to bet he doesn’t, so it’s not like he cost him money either, just a notation in the record book.

    Call me cold-hearted but who fucking cares? He still pitched great and his team won. I think many people are over-reacting.

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  60. Scotto says:

    IMO this is a big deal because umpires do make mistakes and this provides a great showcase for why replay is essential in the game of baseball. I have played the game my whole life and the fact is 90% of all baseball plays are easily reviewable and have little impact on the flow of the game (if you discount balls/strikes, which is another argument). Close calls at any base, home runs, fair balls called foul, any third out play not called an out… we have the technology now to have someone sitting in a booth, watching these plays, and making a quick accurate call based on the available replays to let us know if an ump made a mistake. Why is this not apart of the game???

    If we just use common sense I bet replay can cover 95-99% of all the questionable calls and can cover them quickly. There should be no delay of game tactics, no throwing of flags or other crazy systems, this is MLB. They have the revenues, so pay another umpire to watch the game, watch the replays, and when he notices a mistake, call it in and within 20 seconds the game is back under way. If the replay is judgemental and the umpire can’t tell then the play on the field stands, end of discussion.

    I mean if someone hits a sinking line drive with two out and the ump calls it a catch and the runner rounding third may have tried to score and after replay they see it was not a catch, send the runner back to third, put the batter at first, and get on with the inning. The Ump blew the call, if we didn’t have replay inning would be over anyway, so not ending the inning and getting the call partially right is better than nothing (even if the run doesn’t score). Common sense can dictate all of these plays, and most of the plays are pretty easy anyways (called safe at first but really was out.. ok he is now out).

    This is a no brainer to me and hopefully baseball finally realizes this.

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  61. Josh says:

    Overturn the call and give him a perfect game retroactively? Absolutely not

    If you want to implement more instant replay into baseball from this point on, that’s fine

    The fact of the matter is thought, that changing the call now is wrong. What happened happened, and if you were to just ignore every other missed call in history and reverse this one just because it’s a perfect game, you would open a can of worms.

    Leave it as it is. Joyce messed up badly. but changing and ignoring what actually happened would be wrong

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    • CircleChange11 says:

      The fact of the matter is thought, that changing the call now is wrong.

      Now, that you’ve used the word ‘fact’ to represent ‘opinion’, I am compelled to ask for your supported explanation of how changing the call is WRONG.

      I am not saying I dis/agree with your opinion, just that your authority of statement makes it irresistable for me to not ask for your explanantion. Your tone indicates that there’s no grey area and I would like to hear why you think that.

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  62. Scotto says:

    Oh and also.. Bud Selig should make an announcement allowing Galarraga’s perfect game to count in the record books and deleting the 28th out as an official at bat. With this announcement he should announce the adaptation of a replay system due to the technology available and specifically this incident as a catalyst for the adaptation and a timetable for when the system will be put into action in MLB games.

    Galarraga’s perfect game was an exact example of what is wrong with baseball today and by using it as an example, even by opening up and changing the record books… this is a good thing. So what if their are many other blown calls that have hurt the game in the past. At some point you have to put a stop to this madness and fix the problem. If you finally say, “hey we realize we have been screwing up these past 10 years due to the technological advancements in the game, this one event is the breaking point and because of it we are fixing baseball for the better” then fix it and fix it right by putting Galarraga in the record books.

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  63. Scotto says:

    And IMO you aren’t opening up a can of worms because you are addressing the problem immediately. What happened is unique. It was the last out. The game was over. It was a perfect game. And the umpire messed up. If their was a replay umpire and a replay rule was in place than the call would have been overturned the perfect game stands. By using this one event, this unique one time event as a catalyst for the replay rule and implementing it into the game of baseball, how can you not overturn the call and have it used as an example.

    Put an Astrix beside it in the record book, let it be known as the date baseball adopted replay, anything before that play becomes irrelevant because the perfect game had not yet happened and enough of the public was still against a replay system and baseball did not have a good enough reason to put a replay system in place. Because of this play they do!!!

    That’s good enough for me and a good enough reason to do the right thing and recognize that a perfect game was thrown.

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  64. Coby DuBose says:

    Hey, while we’re at it, can we use this committee to overturn the 10th inning of the Seattle game last night, and pick up the 11th inning sometime in August?

    Oh, we can’t do that? Twins live with the loss and the Mariners pick up their 7th win of the season?

    This article seems to be very knee-jerk and free of any real analysis into what is a more complicated situation than, “Hey, let’s adjust this here call!”

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  65. Mark Weist says:

    I once had a bookie friend who told me, that in professional sports there is always an edge to be gained and that edge is always……always, with the bookmakers.

    Ask yourself this: if someone in Vegas plunked down a million dollars at a Sports Book, betting there would be a 3rd perfect game this year at pretty good odds, how many phone calls were made from that Sports Book at say, around the 7th inning of a potential 3rd perfect game?

    But hey, it’s just a game? Right?

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  66. Good article, wish I could come up with stuff like that for my blog, lmfao.

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