What Alex Rodriguez’s Suspension Means for the Yankees

The suspension portion of the Alex Rodriguez Legal Battle Royale Season One has finally been resolved. The Yankees and the writers who analyze them can officially remove the A-Rod variable. Yesterday, arbitrator Frederic Horowitz released his decision that Rodriguez’s suspension would be reduced from 211 games to 162 games. While Rodriguez benefits in the decision, it’s quite a bit less than he anticipated. A-Rod will appeal to federal courts, but as Wendy Thurm noted in her article yesterday:

A court may intervene [in an arbitration decision] only when the arbitrator strays so far from his authority that he “dispenses his own brand of justice,” as the Supreme Court wrote in a recent opinion.

It’s pretty clear that Horowitz did no such thing, since he reduced the sentence without eliminating it. Personally, I wonder if the fate of Shyam Das affected Horowitz’s decision. Das was the arbitrator who ruled in favor of Ryan Braun prior to the 2012 season. Major League Baseball then fired Das, seemingly due to the decision against them. That’s one of the challenges facing baseball arbitrators, they must walk a fine line with their decisions or else risk losing their job. To me, it smells like Horowitz sided with A-Rod but decided to walk the line. That’s just my personal speculation and even if I’m right, it doesn’t matter.

What does matter is that the Yankees now know that they have another $24.3 million to spend and a hole at third base to plug. The Yankees have an outside shot at staying under the $189 million luxury tax rate. According to Joel Sherman and Ken Davidoff, they are currently at $151.5 million with the arbitration cases of Francisco Cervelli, Brett Gardner, Shawn Kelley, Ivan Nova, and David Robertson still pending. Matt Swartz of MLB Trade Rumors estimates that the quintet will cost $14.8 million. So the Yankees are working with roughly $23 million to spend in 2014. Keep in mind that in-season acquisitions also go against this figure.

The Yankees have two black holes that need to be addressed – third base and the rotation. The free agent market offers slim pickings at third base. The Yankees won’t have to pay much in order to sign Mark Reynolds, Michael Young, or Justin Turner, but as the saying goes “you get what you pay for.” The club has been connected with Young and Reynolds. There has also been speculation that Kelly Johnson could play third base, but that’s assuming that Brian Roberts can top the 77 games he played last season – and that was the most he’s played since 2009. Never mind that Johnson has almost no experience at the hot corner (admittedly, could he be worse than Young or Reynolds defensively?).

The trade market doesn’t appear to include any palatable solutions. The Yankees have few prospects nearing major league readiness, which means they won’t be able to convince a team like the San Diego Padres to part with Chase Headley. Some options that might be more attainable include Lonnie Chisenhall, Freddy Galvis, and Josh Satin. A few second sackers like Rickie Weeks or Daniel Murphy might also work as options and the Yankees could consider sliding Stephen Drew to third base. Any way you slice it, the outlook is bleak. It’s a good thing the Yankees upgraded at catcher and in the outfield, because their infield is primed to provide very little value.

Starting pitcher is that other black hole and it’s where most of their remaining funds should go. The Yankees currently have a three man rotation of CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, and Nova. Michael Pineda is an interesting rotation candidate, but he’s better suited to battle for a job with a team like Chicago. It’s not like the Yankees to rely on so many unknown quantities and the only reason they might do so is because of the luxury tax. Other options include Adam Warren, David Huff, and David Phelps – none of which are more than depth pieces as starters.

The Yankees are widely assumed to be one of the front runners for Masahiro Tanaka. If they do win Tanaka, his AAV will be close to the $23 million that the Yankees have left to spend. The club can and probably will get creative might like to get creative by offering a backloaded deal so that they can sign or trade for another quality pitcher. Unfortunately, the CBA wisely prevents such loopholes by using a contract’s AAV for determining the luxury tax burdern

Of course, many teams are bidding on Tanaka and they all have something different to offer. There is a very real chance that the Yankees won’t win the bidding. Thankfully, a variety of good pitchers remain available. The list potentially includes Ubaldo Jimenez, Matt Garza, Ervin Santana, Bronson Arroyo as free agents and Justin Masterson, Homer Bailey, Jeff Samardzija, and David Price as trade bait. That last name is probably out of the question and any high quality trade target will be difficult for the Yankees to afford. With free agents, the Yankees could again offer backloaded contracts to avoid the luxury tax in 2014.

And that sums up where the Yankees stand now that the A-Rod suspension has been confirmed. Third base appears to be an unsolvable quandary, with Stephen Drew perhaps representing the most savory option. But signing Drew would reduce the amount of money available to sign two starting pitchers – at least it will if the Yankees are strict about staying under the $189 million luxury tax threshold. Those pitchers probably need to be of a fairly high quality if the club is to reach the postseason. Sabathia, Kuroda, and Nova are not guaranteed to stay healthy, and the rest of the internal options after Pineda are swing starters. The Yankees on standing on shaky ground.



Print This Post



Brad is a former collegiate player who writes for FanGraphs, MLB Trade Rumors, The Hardball Times, RotoWorld, and The Fake Baseball. He's also the lead MLB editor for RotoBaller. Follow him on Twitter @BaseballATeam or email him here.


Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Bill
Guest
Bill
2 years 8 months ago

They have substantially less than $23M remaining to spend for 2014 if they wish to stay under the luxury tax threshold. The above figures don’t include the Yankees 1/30th share of benefits (about $10.8M in 2013, likely higher in 2014), or 40-man roster players, or salaries for pre-arb players, or perks or potential bonuses. Realistically, they have no more than about $5M left to spend with the current roster to have any hope of finishing below $189M.

AsstGMNYY
Guest
AsstGMNYY
2 years 8 months ago

I’m afraid you don’t know what you are talking about, dude. You add like a Red Sox fan.

ValueArb
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Pretty sure the cap number includes benefits, so the article’s estimate of Yankee cap space is off by $10M right there. Joel Sherman is a terrible source, he simply reads BB-Ref pages without comprehension.

pete
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

I’m fairly certain cap numbers don’t include benefits. Still the Yankees have about 14 million to spend and can always trade Cervelli and Gardner.

SocraticGadfly
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Exactly right. Cot’s Contracts has the same problem. It includes individual salaries, but not the approximately $10.5-$11M each team owes to league pensions and related. And, it doesn’t list the $3.2M ding that A-Rod still leaves.

Sherman (plus Cot’s et al) also don’t list 2013 salaries, for 2014, of arbitration eligibles not yet inked for 2014, as Bill notes.

Reality? With arb raises, plus pension contributions, etc.? The Yankees are actually at about $187M, by my guesstimates.

So, the reality is, signing Tanaka puts them WAYY over cap. Signing, even, a Garza puts them over the cap. Even trying to upgrade to fill the black hole at 3B would likely do it.

This also ignores in-season call-ups etc.

Andrew Stoeten
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

And is a club’s luxury tax number not based on AAV, meaning that backloading won’t save them?

Jon L.
Guest
Jon L.
2 years 8 months ago

Yes, I also don’t see how backloading the contract would benefit the Yankees.

StantheMan
Guest
StantheMan
2 years 8 months ago

I think the benefit being referred to is if they back-load it they have more money available this season to plug short-term holes.

CardinalRules
Guest
CardinalRules
2 years 8 months ago

Yeah. Back-loading won’t work in the sense of paying low in 2014 and having higher salaries in subsequent years. They could work it by giving him more total years than they would have otherwise.

Persona non grata
Guest
Persona non grata
2 years 8 months ago

If player options are considered guaranteed money, could they just add 10 $1MM player options to his contract? Turns $160MM / 7 years ($23MM) into $170MM / 17 years ($10MM). Essentially, this is just deferred payments and they could add scaling fees if he opts out ($10MM the first year, $9MM the next, etc). I’m not sure if that works, but it certainly appears to be 17 years worth of guaranteed money and would certainly qualify as creative.

Jay29
Member
Jay29
2 years 8 months ago

Yeah, I would definitely recommend signing Tanaka to a 25-year, $150 M contract. I don’t think Tanaka’s agent would love it, though.

worldseries26
Guest
worldseries26
2 years 8 months ago

Persona non grata good thought, but yeah they have stipulations written in to avoid that, kinda like how the Devils in hockey got hit with a huge penalty for circumventing the salary cap with the Kovalchuk.

matt
Guest
matt
2 years 8 months ago

I thought that backloaded contracts still counted for the Average Annual Value against the luxury tax, which would prevent backloading to get around it. Also, I’ve read elsewhere that with all the factors in the Luxury Tax, the Yankees are already much closer to $189M and it’s almost a given that they will go over. What’s responsible for the discrepancy in numbers?

matt
Guest
matt
2 years 8 months ago

And it appears that in the time it took me to read the article and type that out on my phone, both my points were already raised by other people.

Tim A
Guest
Tim A
2 years 8 months ago

Yep they do, also the Yanks have insurance benefits, and other expenses that count towards payroll. They probably have more like 8m to spend under the cap. I think they go for Tanaka and blow past it, the best chance they had of getting under was dumping salary at last years deadline, getting under for 2013, and bulking back up this offseason with a reset tax rate.

Bill F.
Guest
Bill F.
2 years 8 months ago

Well, looks like another year with no Post Season.

Hurtlockertwo
Guest
Hurtlockertwo
2 years 8 months ago

We can only hope.

Bill
Guest
Bill
2 years 8 months ago

Could they sign Drew and move their current SS to 3rd?

Billy
Guest
Billy
2 years 8 months ago

Yeah, if Derek Jeter has conquered his ankle injury and the Yankees have an opening at third, I really would be inclined to move him over there if it were my decision. That ankle injury coupled with defense that was never amazing could have him close to replacement level even if he can still hit like he did in 2012.

I’m going to be a little disgusted if they play Jeter at short and Brendan Ryan (or Stephen Drew if they blow over the luxury tax and get him) or some other far-better-defender-and-worse-hitter at third.

Ian R.
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Isn’t Jeter’s biggest defensive problem his inability to go left? Even if he agreed to move, which isn’t going to happen, moving him to third would leave him just as exposed.

Spit Ball
Guest
Spit Ball
2 years 8 months ago

THIS

Billy
Guest
Billy
2 years 8 months ago

I thought it was trouble going to his non-glove side, which for a shortstop would be going to his right. I could be wrong here, but that was what I thought…

But yeah, obviously, if my impression were correct, you can see why I’d like him at third. Anyone else have a definitive answer on this?

TADontAsk
Guest
TADontAsk
2 years 8 months ago

What I’ve gathered from these comments is that Jeter struggles whenever he has to go left OR right.

Eric Garcia McKinley
Member
2 years 8 months ago

Another relevant question is what does it mean for Alex Rodriguez in 2014? Does he attempt, probably fruitlessly, to change any component of the ruling? It would likely take the entire season for anything to happen anyways. Does he go to Japan for the year or even end his career there? I don’t see him retiring.

Marc
Guest
Marc
2 years 8 months ago

MLB suspensions are upheld in almost every other professional league. He wouldn’t be allowed to play in Japan either.

He would/could play in an independent league in America though. Hello, Long Island Ducks!

Eric Garcia McKinley
Member
2 years 8 months ago

I didn’t know that. That’s surprising if true.

Ian R.
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

My understanding is that even many of the US independent leagues uphold MLB suspensions. He may have to pull a Manny Ramirez and play in Taiwan.

No chance he’ll retire, though. Too much money left on that Yankees contract.

Byrne
Guest
Byrne
2 years 8 months ago

I believe the rule is that a player can play with an Indy League team so long as said Indy League team has the suspended player’s MLB organization’s approval. Chances would seem highly unlikely the Yanks would grant that approval unless there is a buyout situation forthcoming and they’re going to just wash their hands with A-Rod.

Byrne
Guest
Byrne
2 years 8 months ago

Should the Yanks not waive/buyout A-rod, I think the odds are in favor of him spending the entire year (if the suspension is upheld) in Minor League camp/Extended Spring Training with the injured/rehabbing Yankees, rookies and recent draftees.

SocraticGadfly
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Or Korea. Its pro league also honors MLB suspensions like this.

LHPSU
Guest
LHPSU
2 years 8 months ago

Even if NPB allows him to play, he’ll probably have to forfeit his Yankees contract to do so. Don’t see any way he can play in another professional league without the Yankees releasing him.

pft
Guest
pft
2 years 8 months ago

Arod could afford to start his own personal league to play in. Or at least hire a couple of ex-major league pitchers, umpires and coaches to work out with

Jerry
Guest
Jerry
2 years 8 months ago

I think a lot of people are underestimating the Yankees going into next season. The general consensus seems to be that they’re no better (and probably worse) than they were last year. I think Cameron wrote up a WAR analysis on Fangraphs describing the Yankees recent signings and losses. I believe he concluded the team came out about even in free agency, albeit without taking into account the full effect of McCann’s pitch framing skills. His analysis did not account for the effects of players returning from injury. Jeter returning at short will be a big boost over ’13, even if he is old and washed up, Texiera at first, he’s still good for OBP, power, and defense, a HUGE upgrade over Overbay/Reynolds. Sabathia pitched much of last season hurt. While I wouldn’t expect him to return to pre-2012 levels, a bounceback year significantly better than 2013 is in the works. Assuming Kuroda regresses slightly, Nova remains about the same, Pineda contributes something (albeit much less than Pettitte at the 4), Phelps, Nuno, Warren etc provide about the same value as last year at the 5, and considering the Yankees almost made the playoffs last season, to think they are in the same or worse shape (as appears to be the consensus) this year seems inaccurate. And of course, if they do blow by the 189 figure….

David S
Guest
David S
2 years 8 months ago

I think they will no better or worse than last year simply because of how much they over performed last year. This is a team that managed to win 85 games despite a negative 21 run differential and overshot its Pythagorean expected wins by 7 (78 expected)

Jerry
Guest
Jerry
2 years 8 months ago

Comparing last year’s WAR (approximately) to this year’s STEAMER’s projections, and putting the Yankees at a true value of 78 wins last year:

2013 2014 Difference
1.6 3.8 2.2 Catcher
0.0 2.0 2.0 1B
6.0 2.0 -4.0 2B
0.0 0.0 0 3B
0.0 1.5 1.5 SS
6.4 6.9 .5 OF
0.0 0 0 DH
.5 SP

This is assuming they make no more offseason moves, Soriano is the full time DH, starting rotation is a mix of Sabathia, Kuroda, Pineda, Nova, Phelps, Warren, and Nuno, bench and bullpen stay approximately the same (more unpredictable sans Rivera, but about the same average projection). This improves their win total by 2.7, or about 81 wins. If they go over 189 (which I think they will), signing, say Ubaldo Jimenez, another 2.5 wins, putting them at 83 wins. Midseason acquisition (which they usually do), another win, say, and you’ve got an 84 win season, about at last year’s level, as you predicted.

What’s the projected number of wins needed to make the playoffs this year?

NS
Guest
NS
2 years 8 months ago

97 last year. 92 for a play-in game. Long, long way to go.

ankle explosion hr celebration
Guest
ankle explosion hr celebration
2 years 8 months ago

No projection of the Yankees is complete without massive, crippling injuries to most of the players you mentioned. McCann, Ellsbury, Jeter, Kuroda, Texeira, and Sabathia will all be past 30+, and some of those guys have recent injuries, both of which factors are strongly predictive for future injuries.

Also, it should be noted–no Mo. Only ~2 WAR, but having an automatic relief ace like that for the high-leverage situations probably helped them overperform their Pythag last year. That won’t be the case this year.

ankle explosion hr celebration
Guest
ankle explosion hr celebration
2 years 8 months ago

“No projection of the Yankees is complete without massive, crippling injuries to most of the players you mentioned.”

before someone crucifies me, most is an overstatement. Many is probably more correct. Or at the least, some.

The Typical Idiot Fan
Guest
The Typical Idiot Fan
2 years 8 months ago

Here’s the cross. Watch your step climbing up onto it.

ankle explosion hr celebration
Guest
ankle explosion hr celebration
2 years 8 months ago

sweet, my very own cross.

Jerry
Guest
Jerry
2 years 8 months ago

STEAMER takes into account likelihood of injuries. You could assume the worst, sure, but doing so is no more accurate than assuming Ellsbury and McCann will all have career years and Teixeira will revert back to 2009 form. I’ve projected an average scenario based on STEAMER.

Jerry
Guest
Jerry
2 years 8 months ago

The real wild card for the Yanks is Michael Pineda. There will be positive and (mostly) negative projections about him. STEAMER has him at .6 WAR but he’s more likely to be at 2+ or 0.

ankle explosion hr celebration
Guest
ankle explosion hr celebration
2 years 8 months ago

STEAMER doesn’t take into account injury history, according to their website.

http://steamerprojections.com/blog/methods/

It does say that they take into account “aging”, but not necessarily the effect of aging on injury, nor how position interacts with aging to determine injury probability. In fact, it’s not clear to me that STEAMER takes into account likelihood of injury at all; what’s your source for that?

At any rate, because it ignores injury history, STEAMER does not fully account for how likely the Yankees are to be injured.

ankle explosion hr celebration
Guest
ankle explosion hr celebration
2 years 8 months ago

Oh right, I also forgot Carlos Beltran and even relatively young whippersnapper Brett Gardner. In point of fact, every single Yankee position player projected to be worth more than 1 WAR next year is over 30, as well as the top 2 pitchers. (Indeed, the only >1WAR players younger than 30 are Ivan Nova and David Phelps.)

My guess is that such roster construction is not a recipe for success.

SocraticGadfly
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

No Mo affects, with a team that had him for that long, how you set up the whole pen for whomever is the closer.

Beyond this, with an infield that sucky, unless they wave much more money than the Dodgers, why would Tanaka go there?

Pitnick
Guest
Pitnick
2 years 8 months ago

I’m not sure they get anything out of McCann’s pitch framing. He’s rated very highly for each year that we have data, but so is Chris Stewart, whose spot he’s taking.

Also, as far as them almost making the playoffs last year, you have to consider that they outplayed their run differential. They were actually outscored last year by 21 runs. Safer to assume they were a 79-win team last year and adjust from there how much better or worse they are.

Pitnick
Guest
Pitnick
2 years 8 months ago

…and apparently I had this tab open for several hours before commenting, so much of this has been addressed. Carry on.

SocraticGadfly
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Well, it sounds like you’re being optimistic on the degree of Jeter bounce-back. And, you forgot, no Rivera. IMO, Yankees are no better for 2014 than 2013. And, given their Pythagorean last year and other things, anything above 84 wins this year would definitely surprise me.

Inspector Gadget
Guest
Inspector Gadget
2 years 8 months ago

I think I got it. How ’bout this? How ’bout this? We trade Jim Leyritz and Bernie Williams, for Barry Bonds, huh? Whadda ya think? That way you have Griffey and Bonds, in the same outfield! Now you got a team! Ha ha ha.

Wimpy
Guest
Wimpy
2 years 8 months ago

As a Brewers fan, I would gladly get a prospect Tuesday and give away Rickie Weeks today.

coldseat
Guest
coldseat
2 years 8 months ago

They have a decent tradeable asset in LF…remains to be seen if there are any decent deals out there to be had.

Kenneth
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Since they relegated an outfielder to DH, Yanks should try Soriano at third. It’s worth a couple of weeks of spring training. It’s a waste to have a DH who can still play the field. Then they can rotate the catcher and other over 30 non-pitchers through DH.

Spit Ball
Guest
Spit Ball
2 years 8 months ago

Kelly Johnson hits righties just as well as Soriano and has much more recent experience in the infield.

pft
Guest
pft
2 years 8 months ago

“It’s pretty clear that Horowitz did no such thing, since he reduced the sentence without eliminating it. ”

I do not think its clear at all. He did not allow Arods team to question Selig about the suspension length despite precedence (Bud testified in the Rocker case about the length), and the suspension length is not close to the spirit of the JDA/CBA and is without precedence.

“But signing Drew would reduce the amount of money available to sign two starting pitchers – at least it will if the Yankees are strict about staying under the $189 million luxury tax threshold”

Dude, the after arb signings and benefits, the Yankees have less than 10 million to play with to stay under 189. They don’t even have enough to sign Drew and stay under 189. let alone Drew and 2 SP’ers.

The paradox here is if Arod got only 65 games, the Yankees would have no hope of 189 and would be more motivated to spend money. Now, they can save 80 million in salary, tax and revenue sharing so can take the revenue hit of being an 85 W team, which will be at least 50 million like it was last year, perhaps a bit more since attendance lags performance by about a year.

SocraticGadfly
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Agreed, especially since the Yanks are in repeater land on the tax. Write off 2014, get below $189M by any means possible, and look to the future.

I mean, this is a team that has a gaping hole for the longer term at 2B, and at SS, whether Jeter retires this year or a year later. You gotta get below the $189M and rebuild.

Richie
Guest
Richie
2 years 8 months ago

“To me, it smells like Horowitz sided with A-Rod but decided to walk the line.” A telling indictment of Fangraphs and Saberdom in general. A private opinion about which, being private, we as of yet know nothing. Yet Wendy, Brad, the veritable myriad of posters here, all scream to the high heavens “HOW DARE HE?! HOW DARE HE?! HOW DARE HE?!” Since Will Carroll was driven out of BP, has there been a single Saber writer on any site ever take the “I’m glad when ‘roids use is punished” position?

If/When the opinion does become public, if it does show substantial evidence ARod tried to buy up the evidence with the intention of destroying it, seriously, even that wouldn’t move Brad/Wendy/any of you one single, solitary inch, would it?

pft
Guest
pft
2 years 8 months ago

So bring it on baby. Show me the evidence. Despite countless leaks and TV shows he have squat here. Don’t hold your breath either.

Which is worse anyways, Arod trying to buy his own records, or MLB actually buying records they knew to be stolen and knowing they were hindering a state investigation?

Steve Holt!!
Guest
Steve Holt!!
2 years 8 months ago

There must be boatloads of evidence. Some of it will be released in the fullness of time. There have been a few decent articles about the evidence that the media knows are available, and that does not even involve a look at the medical records at the center of the controversy.

Steve Holt!!
Guest
Steve Holt!!
2 years 8 months ago

In agreement with Ritchie…

Remember, also, that in Braun’s most recent suspension, he was given 65 (ie. >50) games on the basis that it was his second doping offence. The successful appeal was still described as the first offence.

With this in mind, A-Rod is lucky to be not suspended for life, given that this is his (by my count) 4th offence (one positive test), with the admissions in 2003, the positive stimulant test in 2006, the Galea contacts, and the Biogenesis contacts. I would suggest to Brad and Wendy that MLB had more than enough to ban him for life, and he is lucky that it is just costing him one season.

PED’s are dangerous and performance enhancing, and a line in the sand needs to be drawn at some stage.

David
Guest
David
2 years 8 months ago

People are interested in what appear to be inconsistencies between the length of A-Rod’s suspension and those of other recent players. Inconsistent and arbitrary punishment is bad. The simplistic “I’m glad when ‘roids use is punished” position completely misses the point.

Steve Holt!!
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Recently came to light that the 162 game suspension is for use of three different banned substances (testosterone, IGF-1 and HGH from memory), plus a few more games for the hampering of the investigation. That accounts for most of the length of the ban. Interestingly, it would be nearly impossible for someone to get busted for all three drugs at the same time as IGF-1 and HGH need timely blood tests.

NS
Guest
NS
2 years 8 months ago

“veritable myriad”

lol tryhard

SocraticGadfly
Guest
2 years 8 months ago

Love the comment. And largely agree.

Nate
Guest
Nate
2 years 8 months ago

Why would they be considering Freddy Galvis at third? He’s a defensive wizard who can’t hit a lick, so he’s naturally suited for the middle infield. He’s provided his greatest value subbing for Chase Utley and Jimmy Rollins the past couple years. I feel like the Yankees would be much more interested in somebody else, even with the Phillies organization. How about Cody Asche?

Tanned Tom
Guest
Tanned Tom
2 years 8 months ago

With A-Fraud out, the easiest solution is to move Jeter to 3B, live with defensive deficiencies, go with Ryan at SS and live with his limp bat. But of course they will not do that. Also they should trade Suzuki ASAP for whatever salary relief they can manage. Their plan for the rotation seems to be Tanaka or bust.

AK7007
Member
AK7007
2 years 8 months ago

“To me, it smells like Horowitz sided with A-Rod but decided to walk the line. That’s just my personal speculation and even if I’m right, it doesn’t matter.”

To me, it smells like you (Brad Johnson) are a fucking idiot who declined to even read Wendy’s article. Horowitz upheld the 2014 suspension, and the public has received from MLB or Horowitz no justification for the arbitrary suspension length. 211 games, such a specific length. It had nothing to do with a specific punishment – it was a suspension until 2014 was over, in the hopes that it would completely end A-rod’s career without an unprecedented lifetime ban for a first offense.

Then, there is your piss-poor commentary on what the Yank’s next move should be. Backloaded contracts don’t help with luxury tax. You should know that working for this site. It’s poor reporting that you didn’t look into it. Also, SP isn’t a “black hole” for the Yanks. They are projected to receive ~15 WAR from their rotation, which is 10th in MLB. Hardly a black hole. That’s not to say that your conclusion that they will sign Tanaka is incorrect. The back end is less than ideal, but you didn’t say that, or illustrate why Tanaka fits for their roster.

Basically, I wasted my time reading this, and need to wait for Jeff or Dave to write about it tomorrow. I really like the former player angle, but this really isn’t the type of piece that requires it, especially when such little effort is given.

7007KA
Guest
7007KA
2 years 8 months ago

I couldn’t be bothered to read the piss-poor comment by that fucking idiot. I can be bothered wasting my time in posting this though.

7007KA
Guest
7007KA
2 years 8 months ago

Also, why do you need to wait for Sullivan or Cameron to write about it (I’m not on first name terms with either, alas) since you already know everything?

NS
Guest
NS
2 years 8 months ago

“Basically, I wasted my time reading this”

And my time is important. That’s why I’m spending another four paragraphs talking about it.

Ed Lipton
Guest
Ed Lipton
2 years 8 months ago

If George were alive he would say: “Screw the luxury tax. Get what we need to win!” But the boys are more concerned with their already huge inheritance than the fate of the great legacy of the Yankees.

wpDiscuz