What Is R.A. Dickey’s Trade Value?

The Mets have been talking to R.A. Dickey about a contract extension for months, and since he’s still unsigned, there are clearly some issues that aren’t so easy to resolve between the two sides. So, they’re weighing all of their options, and the primary option for a team with a player who is a year from free agency is to trade him. Given that Zack Greinke is the lone free agent hurler who is viewed as a clear impact starter, the Mets could theoretically take advantage of a seller’s market, and shopping Dickey as a fall-back plan for the teams who don’t get Greinke might end up bringing back real talent.

Word from Jayson Stark today is that the Mets have “gotten serious” about trading Dickey and he could potentially be moved during the meetings here in Nashville. That would probably require Greinke to sign here as well, as maximizing Dickey’s return would likely involve pulling a Greinke runner-up into the bidding. Assuming Greinke does choose between a large paycheck in LA or a large paycheck in Texas, what could the Mets reasonably ask for in return for one year of a 38-year-old knuckleball specialist?

In one sense, the value seems to be limited by the fact that he’s only under contract for one more year. However, it’s one ridiculously cheap year, and he is clearly willing to sign an extension at a price that he believes is fair, so this isn’t necessarily a rental. Instead, Dickey should be viewed more like Adrian Gonzalez, who was also traded in the final year of a bargain contract, and then re-signed with the Red Sox rather than hitting free agency the following year. In order to acquire Gonzalez, the Red Sox gave up their #1 and #3 prospects, plus another toolsy first round pick who was thought to have some upside. We shouldn’t just immediately assume that Dickey’s contract status is going to keep someone from making a significant offer.

Of course, Gonzalez was headed into his age-29 season, while Dickey just turned 38 at the end of the season. There is a significant difference in expected future value, as even if Dickey agrees to a two year extension after getting traded, a team is only looking at three years of team control, with one of those coming in Dickey’s age-40 season. Knuckleballer aging curves look nothing like normal pitcher aging curves, but there’s still going to be more hesitation about what Dickey can offer in the future than there was with Gonzalez. Additionally, the changes to the free agent compensation system reduce the original team’s leverage, as they are now looking at one supplemental round draft pick rather than two picks, one of which could have been a mid-first rounder. So, the Mets can’t ask for a Gonzalez-style package in exchange for Dickey.

But, extra years of team control goes both ways. While the Red Sox were obviously expecting significant value from Gonzalez for the first few years of that contract, the odds of him earning his paychecks at the back end weren’t very good. While years 1-4 were probably surplus value for Boston, years 5-7 were probably a net negative, and were included because Gonzalez had enough leverage to demand a seven year deal to avoid free agency. So, three years of team control for Dickey might not be so different in terms of overall value as seven years of Gonzalez, especially once you factor in the drastically different AAVs that are being discussed.

Gonzalez’s seven year deal paid him $154 million, while the rumored price for Dickey is somewhere in the range of $20-$30 million for two years. Even if we give him $30 million, the difference in the extensions is five years and $125 million – how much extra value do we really think Gonzalez is adding at that kind of price?

Especially when their recent performances aren’t actually all that different. From 2008 to 2010, Gonzalez produced +14.7 WAR for the Padres. From 2010 to 2012, Dickey has produced +14.8 RA9-WAR, which is a better measure of a knucklerballer’s value because of their ability to limit hits on balls in play. Even if you want to split the difference between his RA9-WAR and FIP-WAR, Dickey’s still coming in at +12 for the last three years. It’s hard to argue that Dickey has performed at a level demonstrably lower than what Gonzalez had performed at prior to the trade with Boston.

Dickey’s older, but is part of a group of players who age exceptionally well. He’s a pitcher, but he’s also going to come with a smaller, shorter commitment. The Mets don’t have as much leverage due to free agent compensation, but might have more leverage due to the scarcity of elite pitching available this winter. For every argument about Gonzalez having significantly more trade value, there’s a decent counter-argument for favoring Dickey. I don’t think New York can ask for the same kind of package, but that deal is probably a better benchmark than many of the other rent-a-star maneuvers of the past.

So, what does that translate into? If Greinke goes to one of the LA clubs, then maybe you’re asking Texas for Mike Olt and Leonys Martin. If he goes to Texas, then maybe you’re asking the Dodgers for Zach Lee and Joc Pederson. If the Mets are willing to move Dickey, this is the kind of price they should be asking. Even with just one year left on his deal, the expected cost of an extension and the history of knucklers suggest that he’s not just a one year player. And, for multiple years of an impact pitcher, the Mets should be able to land a significant package. Maybe it isn’t on par with what San Diego got for Adrian Gonzalez, but it should be in the ballpark. Dickey’s worth that kind of return.




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Dave is a co-founder of USSMariner.com and contributes to the Wall Street Journal.


80 Responses to “What Is R.A. Dickey’s Trade Value?”

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  1. matthew says:

    What would it take from Kansas City? I don’t feel like they have to throw in Wil Myers to make a deal.

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    • That Guy says:

      Is Montgomery and Cuthbert enough?

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      • Matt Mosher says:

        From a Mets fan, no way.

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      • Cidron says:

        fans tend to be loyal… but, from/for a GM perspective, is Montgomery and Cuthbert enough?

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      • vivalajeter says:

        Cidron, from a GM perspective this doesn’t seem anywhere close to enough, unless they’re the 3rd/4th pieces in a deal. Fangraphs recently put out a top-15 KC prospect list, and Cuthbert was #15. He also plays the one position where the Mets are locked in through 2020. Montgomery didn’t even make the list, and the author went so far as to say he already flamed out. If you’re the GM for the Mets, why would you even consider such a trade?

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      • That Guy says:

        @vivalajeter I used the link on the right side of fangraph’s main page for the prospect listing. (I should have known better though, since I know that Monty’s prospect status is dead) Using the current list (http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/index.php/kansas-city-royals-top-15-prospects/) do you think Zimmer, Bonifacio, and Mondesi get us in the ballpark? I have a tough time including Myers since he’s obviously replacing Frenchy in RF this year. Right?

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    • acerimusdux says:

      From a GM perspective, the Mets need an outfielder who can be an average or better regular by next season. Meyers is a high price, but If I’m KC, I certainly don’t want to part with Gordon either.

      So who else you got? Maybe you can try to build a package around Lorenzo Cain, and one of your top 10 prospects. Cain plus any of Odorizzi, Ventura, Mondessi, or Starling probably would be attractive enough to at least consider. Maybe even Cain + Bonafacio? At least that gets you in the discussion, though someone else could top that (and Olt + Martin likely would).

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  2. Chris says:

    What would a package from the Angels look like?

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  3. Travis L says:

    I don’t understand why this article is focused on making comparisons between the two players. I think the differences outweigh the similarities.

    Similarities: traded in final year of a bargain contract, rumored willing to sign an extension before hitting the market (although not necessarily a significant savings from a free agent deal — anyone think AGon would have made a ton more in FA?)

    Differences: pitcher v hitter. 9 years in age. Different team situations. Expected length of desired extension. Knuckleballer vs. fundamentally sound hitter. AAV.

    Serious stretch to make comparisons, here. Wouldn’t it have made more sense to analyze Dickey in a vacuum?

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  4. Dan says:

    The last 3 years, Dickey has averaged roughly 3 WAR per season. That’s good, but not great production. As you point out he’s also old (regardless of how you view a knuckleballer aging). The question to most teams would be to what extent was his 2012 season repeatable. If he can do that again, he’d be worth a decent trade package. But if he reverts back to his mediocre 2010 and 2011 numbers, he isn’t worth much at all on the trade market.

    I’d guess if they tried to trade him they could snag a few secondary prospects, but can’t imagine a team giving up a top tier prospect in exchange for a old knuckleballer regardless of how good or great he was in 2012.

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    • Eric says:

      He’s averaging more than 4 bWAR over those years and wasn’t even in the rotation at the start of 2010.

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    • Eric says:

      Also, how are ERAs of 2.84 and 3.28 mediocre? And he’s outperformed his FIP and xFIP very consistently since becoming a knuckleballer.

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      • Mentoch says:

        That’s to be expected. Almost all Knuckleballers out preform their FIP//xFIP, which is why I struggle to trust fWAR while analyzing Dickey.

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      • Dan says:

        is your sole basis for pitcher production ERA? I’m referring to his K/9, his BB/9, and his HR/9 rates amongst other things.

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    • Richard Dean Anderson says:

      I was under the impression a knuckleballer can’t be evaluated by FIP, therefore his war won’t be accurate.

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    • philosofool says:

      I think Dickey would probably be willing to sign potentially very team friendly contract for $5-10m in additional guaranteed money. He’s old enough that he knows he’s probably never getting a big free agent pay day and has made little enough that an additional $5m really changes how the rest of his life goes financially.

      Imagine getting him to extend by giving him $8m this year, with club options on 2014 and 2015 at $12m a piece, and a $4m buyout. That could be a great deal for a team that’s a potential contender that needs a piece in the rotation, and comes with very little risk. And if he’s even a 2 WAR player in 2013, the team probably exercises the option (it costs just $8m). This seems like a classic example of how differing utilities makes a bargain situation in which everyone benefits.

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      • Jack Strawb says:

        Where’s the benefit to Dickey, though?

        In return for giving the Mets outs, he gets a guaranteed additional $7m for a total of $12m, but that might be all he gets if he craters in 2013. If we agree straight market is more like a 2/26 extension, Dickey is giving up that $26m in return for a measly guarantee of $7m.

        If Dickey rejects your deal and plays out the season and becomes a free agent, all he has to do is limp to two $3.5m deals to recoup what he rejected. Given the scrap heap pitchers who are getting those kinds of deals, Dickey might snag $3.5m as the 2012 NL Cy Young winner even if he misses all of 2013 with arm surgery. Then, in his rehab year, if he goes 5-5 in 20 starts with a 3.8 ERA, he’ll get another $3.5m deal for 2015.

        Basically, Dickey has to figure there’s an excellent chance he blows out his arm in such fashion that no team ever gambles on him again for him to want to take your deal.

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    • Sylvan says:

      “Regular” FIP-based WAR is irrelevant for knuckleballers. Dickey’s been worth an average of 4.9 WAR in actual on-field run prevention the last 3 years by RA9-Wins.

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    • Guest3000 says:

      Please clarify how FIP is “irrelevant for knuckleballers.” I’m not saying I don’t agree, but if you admit that, then you basically admit that all FIP is meaningless. You can’t selectively remove certain types of pitchers without undermining the entire foundation of FIP with regard to BIP.

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      • acerimusdux says:

        Knuckleballers have significant control over BABIP. That’s the whole point of the pitch. This has been a known exception to BABIP theory from the beginning. It gets ignored sometimes just because there aren’t many knuckleballers.

        Another way a lot of pitchers impact BABIP is by inducing a lot of popups.

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  5. JA311 says:

    Whatever team offers the most impact OF bat will get Dickey. Absent that, the Mets will probably just re-sign him.

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    • Jack Strawb says:

      Appalling quiz question:

      If you don’t count Pagan on the grounds that the Mets sold him for cash to the Cubs and didn’t get him back for two years, who is the last homegrown OFer (career OPS+ over 100) to have a PA for the Mets, and what year did he last come to the plate?

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  6. Average_Casey says:

    With Knuckleballers, do you really care about age? I would think that barring arm trouble, Dickey could pitch until he’s 50. I’m not saying that he’d want to but in theory I would think he could.

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    • Eric says:

      In theory, but he does throw quite a bit harder than the average knuckleballer.

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    • Sparkles Peterson says:

      When the guy’s success is predicated upon his ability to throw a knuckleball nearly 80 MPH, I think you have to worry about age. 78 MPH may not sound all that impressive, but without using the wrist and putting backspin on the ball, that’s a pretty demanding feat.

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      • Manic M says:

        You’ve also got a lot of thrust from legs & back, even when “only” throwing 78mph. The guy’s had injuries to his ab muscles and plantar fascitis.

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  7. Paul says:

    This article makes all Jays fans look like idiots who think JP Arencibia or Rasmus straight up is enough for Dickey.

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    • Well-Beered Englishman says:

      On the other hand, Arencibia might net them every remaining Marlin except Giancarlo Stanton.

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    • Guest3000 says:

      I wouldn’t trade Rasmus for 39-year-old R.A. Dickey.

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      • vivalajeter says:

        Well then you’re a fool. It’s easy to replace Rasmus’ production. It’s not easy to find a Cy Young caliber ace.

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      • Cidron says:

        a flash in the pan, one year cy young winning ace. lets be honest about that.

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      • Guest says:

        Cidron, Dickey’s not a flash in the pan. He has a 2.95 ERA in 616 IP over the past 3 seasons, with ERA’s of 2.84 in 2010, 3.28 in 2011, and 2.73 in 2012.

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      • vivalajeter says:

        He was very good in 2010/2011, and after throwing the hard knuckleball he became elite in 2012. Even at his 2010/2011 levels, he would help every team in the league (especially at $5MM next year). If you wanted to call him a flash in the pan 2 off-seasons ago, that would be one thing. But he’s clearly not a flash in the pan now, or so many teams wouldn’t be lining up for him.

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    • ThatGuy says:

      Well some of them do derive their baseball fix with a site called “Drunk Jays Fans”. Don’t bother looking it up, absolute trash.

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    • PatientObserver says:

      Well I don’t speak for all Jays fans, but I think some less-reasoned Blue Jays fans get the idea that Alex Anthopolous can just fleece any team at the drop of a hat, when in fact that rarely happens. I also think a small portion of Jays fans kind of got a “transaction fever” when the “Mathis” trade was completed, and left some people in a daydreaming mode where any acquisition seemed feasible. Then again, I don’t think it’s fair to isolate just Jays fans when you’re talking about unreasonable trade proposals. Either way, I think Jays fans see a Dickey, and they see Toronto’s surplus at the catcher position, and that seems like a natural start to a trade. Rasmus for Dickey is obviously unconscionably light in return for R.A., but I think Arencibia/d’Arnaud/Rasmus/Gose are trade chips worth considering if you’re Alderson.

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  8. BurleighGrimes says:

    In a sense, RA’s age could be a bit less of an issue for an AL team b/c at his age, *anything* (and not only an arm injury) could be career threatening. This includes batting, running the bases, etc., all of which RA does at full blast (for him).

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  9. Ari N says:

    Olt makes no sense for the Mets unfortunately. They have nowhere to play him.

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  10. Brandon says:

    Doesn’t the fact that dickeys knuckleball get thrown faster mean he probably won’t age like a typical knuckleballer?

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    • Choo says:

      Impossible to say, unless you hang your hat on the one and only comp that applies in this case: Joe Niekro.

      Niekro reportedly threw his primary knuckleball in the low-80’s/high-70’s and his final peak season came at age 39. However, the downside of Niekro’s career coincides with his move away from the very pitcher-friendly Astrodome and he had a lot more mileage on his arm than Dickey at the same age.

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  11. Baltar says:

    The Rays asked me to tell you that they are not interested.

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  12. chuckb says:

    I wonder if there’s a connection between the rumors about the Dodgers being interested in Dickey and also being willing to trade Dee Gordon in the right deal. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not sure Gordon’s going to end up being a big league player but if Dickey’s going to go to LA, it’s for some top prospects — or Gordon + another top prospect.

    The Mets have a hole in the middle infield, whether they would choose to play Tejada or Gordon at 2B.

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    • vivalajeter says:

      They have a huge hole in the OF, and a bad catcher. If Gordon’s a throw-in, that’s one thing. If he’s one of the headliners, then I can’t see it happening. I would think they’d want a power hitter, rather than a no-hit speed guy.

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    • acerimusdux says:

      Daniel Murphy, even if he’s a -10 defender at 2B, still nets out to a league average regular there. And Gordon’s not a good infielder, anyway. The Mets would probably move Gordon to the outfield.

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  13. Miguel says:

    38, knuckleballer, I’ll pass.

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  14. Dexter says:

    If it takes Arencibia and some tier 2 prospects for the Jays to land him I’m cool with that. I agree that he’s probably an easy extension.

    Arencibia, Dan Norris and DJ Davis could get it done.

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    • Guest says:

      No it couldn’t the Mets would just re-sign if that’s the best they could get for him

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    • acerimusdux says:

      No to backup catchers and tier 2 prospects. Arencibia is only involved if it’s as a throw in. He’s not really any better than cheap free agents like Snyder and Shoppach.

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    • John Galt says:

      So you’re suggesting the Mets would move a Cy Young winner for a catcher who posts a .275 OBA along with 20 dingers plus a couple of mid level prospects? The Mets already have catchers who can’t hit.

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  15. Cidron says:

    Wherever he lands, one thing the team should have is a “defense first” catcher. Not necessarily a plate blocking, shut down the run game one, but one that is very adept with preventing wild pitches/passed balls. Just one of those things that a GM that is dealing for him should be aware of (just due to the knuckleball).

    Of the teams that have reasonable need as well as reasonable parts to trade away (for him), who has such a catcher on the roster?

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    • Ajd121 says:

      I doubt the Mets would have any hesitation throwing Josh Thole into the deal, especially if they deal him for a catching prospect.

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  16. Marcus says:

    You can’t say that Dickey represents “multiple years of an impact pitcher” when he only has one year left on his deal, and there is clearly no guarantee that the team trading for him will be able to sign him beyond that. With free agency so close, I can definitely see him hitting the open market and trying to clean up with a 2-3 year deal with a team that’s contending for a championship. That is unless some sort of sign and trade is agreed to. Top-25 prospects (overall) are out of the question. Not because Dickey is old or a knuckleballer, those don’t really matter. Because one year of a great pitcher is not worth many years of a top prospect.

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    • acerimusdux says:

      Dickey seems amenable to an extension. But I think I would want a window to extend him before giving up a top prospect like that. The Mets did this when they traded for Santana. You can make the trade contingent on the player agreeing to an extension.

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  17. Dennis says:

    Dickey had a fWAR of 4.6 in 2012. That’s very good but hardly outstanding (Wade Miley had a fWAR of 4.8). Yes he is a knuckleballer so the natural aging regression curve might not apply to him but I doubt he will post 2012 numbers in the AL East due to park factors alone. Say he is 2010/2011 good. Average of 2.7 fWAR between 2010/2011 at a bargain at $5mil. I wouldn’t trade 2 top 100 prospects for that. Hell Roy Halladay only netted the Blue Jays 2 top 100 prospects (Drabek, Michael Taylor was borderline and a reward/risk pickup in d’Arnaud) with an extension in hand (like Dickey, 1 year of control but Halladay was 32). Dickey would look great between JJ and Morrow but if he’s going to cost the price Dave Cameron has outlined above, I would MUCH rather sign Brandon McCarthy for cheap.

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    • acerimusdux says:

      See discussion above for why fWAR doesn’t work for knuckleballers (it only gives credit for strikeouts, walks and HR; the knuckleball is designed to induce bad contact). His average WAR for the last 3 years is 4.9 if you use RA9.

      year ERA+ RA9 RA9avg
      2010 138 3.20 4.25
      2011 112 3.67 4.36
      2012 140 3.00 4.44

      The last column there is an estimate from B-Ref of what “an average pitcher would do against these opponents, with this defense, and in these parks”. Dickey has been well above average each year, and a top 10 SP in the NL in 2 of the 3 years.

      Agree he’s not as good as Halladay was, but he’s a legit #1 making $5M next year.

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  18. MyrEn says:

    How about Saltalamacchia and couple of 2nd tier prospects?

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  19. Rallentando says:

    Dickey isn’t a Cy Young caliber pitcher going forward, his massive spike in K/9 can be attributed to the absolutely dreadful quality of opponents he faced in the 2012 NL East. An impotent Marlins, Phillies and light-hitting Braves squad and one juggernaut in Washington. It would be foolish to assume his 2012 strikeouts are sustainable, or even that his career rates with New York will translate to divisions with stiffer offenses.

    But, he is very valuable to the right team, and I don’t think age or signability should be a barrier to trying to attract him. He’s definitely worth a top prospect, but needy teams need a) a prospect that fits with the Mets, and b) a defense that can fit with Dickey. I don’t think Texas or Kansas City, the two teams in the most discussion in the news, meet both criteria.

    Los Angeles does, but it might sacrifice that defense in the process of acquiring Dickey (Dee Gordon?) and it lacks any top-flight prospects on the level of Myers and Olt. It feels like the most natural fit, though.

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    • Antonio bananas says:

      Light hitting braves squad?

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      • Rallentando says:

        With a team wRC+ of 92, where the mean was 95 and the median 96, the Braves were a below average offensive team in 2012. Of all contending teams, only the Dodgers were worse.

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      • Antonio bananas says:

        They were above average in actual runs. Also, McCann had an abnormally low babip. Maybe their runs scored being above average was due to above average team speed? They lost a big chunk of that with Bourn, but also got more power with Upton. Heyward and freeman should hit for more power. They have way better and way less expensive options. Even if they play Francisco at third and prado in left, that’s probably better than soriano assuming Francisco performs (which yea, is a big if).

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      • Antonio Bananas says:

        The Soriano thing was because I forgot where I was. My point stands that I don’t feel like the Braves are “light hitting”. They should have a pretty balanced lineup in every way. Not outstanding, but not light hitting.

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      • Rallentando says:

        What is this “above average in actual runs”? Runs scored? The 2012 Braves scored 700 runs, which fits them at rank 17 out of 30 teams. That’s slightly below average. Brian McCann’s poor play is undoubtedly due to the chronic injuries he’s been suffering from. The Braves’ hitting suffers from depressed home run totals. Turner Field was a very offense-friendly park this year, but only for doubles. It was middle of the pack for hits and triples and above average for walks. I suspect the Braves’ excellent defense limited triples, but if the Braves were an above-average speed team, it isn’t obvious how that speed translates to baserunning.

        Regardless of what you think the Braves offense should be like, the reality is they were not a strong offensive team in 2012, and pitchers like R.A. Dickey were able to exploit that and the general offensive weakness of all NL East teams not based in Washington, D.C.

        I wouldn’t feel confident betting the Braves will have a mediocre offense in 2013. But I would easily wager that R.A. Dickey isn’t nearly as good as his 2012 would suggest.

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    • Andrew says:

      Two of Dickey’s most incredible performances (back to back complete game one hitters) came against the Yankees and the Rays. Nobody does that to the Yankees.

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  20. snibboDmoT says:

    So if Dickey gets traded, does Thole go with him…?

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    • Andrew says:

      I think that’s a good option. There’s no reason Dickey + Thole can’t get back Wil Myers. Or even send Dickey + Wilmer Flores (near major league ready power-hitting, high average type that plays first or third).

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  21. octelium says:

    Citi is pitcher friendly, if a knuckleball is oopsed it is basically slowpitch softball outta here. So should go to a similar of more pircher friendly / hr hampering stadium. So say Tropicana Field, Petco, Angels stadium, PNC, AT&T, Safeco, No Dodger Stadium because HR rates up from Citi, but Sure to O.Co Colisuem as Hr rates are down even though a tad more hitter friendly.

    Contending teams from that list, A’s(?), dodgers (?), giants, angels, Rays.

    Oh wait Dickey has said Warm weather messes with his pitch so No Rays, Dodgers…

    A’s seem iffy on well everything, Angels will pour cash but poor decision… So To the Giants it is.

    Give a 2/18 extension and then a 7/yr Wakefield mutual renew clause…

    Works nicely into rotation if Lincecum cannot/doesn’t come back to form…

    So can someone tell me what the Giants have available to trade?

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    • Antonio Bananas says:

      Brandon Belt maybe. The only real decent OF prospect they have is Gary Brown. Other than that they have a lot of a few good pitchers. Maybe Belt, SP Crick, SP Blackburn, and 2 lower level high upside OF prospects I don’t know about.

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      • Antonio Bananas says:

        Problem is the Mets would probably want guys closer to the bigs. So now I honestly don’t think the Giants have the guns to pull it off. Blackburn and Crick are both 2-4 years away if all goes well. Nobody else fits either criteria of being really good or close to the Majors.

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    • Andrew says:

      The only weather that Dickey really struggled in was rain. High heat days in the middle of June saw Dickey’s best performances. On the other hand, one bad outing on a rainy, cold day in April and one toward the end of the season (forget which month) were the only reason he didn’t win the ERA title. Seattle would probably be a bad choice for him, but somewhere with moderate to hot temperatures and lower precipitation would be perfect.

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    • snibboDmoT says:

      The Rays play in a dome…

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    • BillWallace says:

      I’d love Dickey on the Giants, but it would be tough. The benefit is you trade $20M in prospects for Dickeys $20M surplus in 2013. And maybe you get more surplus on his next contract.
      The cons are: You’re dumping Zito (probably paying most of his contract and sending him on the the Mets) who is maximized at AT&T, and moving Lincecum to the 5th spot, which might not play well. Also you have to come up with $20M in prospect value that the Mets actually want, which may not happen, and the Giants farm is very thin.

      Actually I talked myself into it. Make it happen Sabes!

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  22. Ian says:

    Chris Stratton, Kyle Zimmer and DJ Davis can’t be traded. They were drafted this year; recent draft picks can’t be traded for one year after signing their first contract.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

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