Feasting on Garbage: Early Strength of Schedule and Team Offense

The Oakland Athletics and the Colorado Rockies are two of the most productive offenses in the league this year, both ranking in the top 5 teams by wRC+. By contrast, the Brewers and Cardinals have been below-average so far, with a 93 wRC+ and 96 wRC+ respectively. Could the strength of these teams’ early schedules be a factor in these varying levels of production?

To evaluate this, I tabulated the actual innings pitched by opponents of the Athletics, Rockies, Brewers, and Cardinals so far in 2014, and then tabulated the anticipated innings for upcoming opponents in June, assuming 9 innings per game. (You could pick any four teams you wanted; these were the ones that interested me). To evaluate the quality of the pitching staffs faced, I used SIERA (published here at FanGraphs) to evaluate the runs the pitching staffs would have been expected to give up, on average, in light of their actual skill sets. Last year, SIERA explained 63% (by r2) of the variance in runs given up by team pitching staffs, making it a good choice for this exercise. Because the pitchers faced in a game are largely outside an opposing team’s control, I used the current, team-average SIERA for each pitching staff, and weighted each inning of a team opponent by that value. I totaled the weighted values to get an aggregate SIERA for the collective opponents of each team.

Let’s start with quality of opposing pitchers for each team in the two months so far:

Opponent SIERA
Lg. Avg. Athletics Rockies Brewers Cardinals
3.73 3.86 3.65 3.58 3.62
AVG RUN EFFECT +7 -4 -8 -6

SIERA can be a difficult statistic to appreciate because it operates on a tighter curve than other pitching statistics (ERA, FIP), and small differences have a surprisingly large effect on runs allowed.  Remember that as with most pitching metrics, however, lower is better.

Let’s work from the league-average SIERA so far this year — 3.73 — to make some overall observations. First, the Rockies’ production is quite impressive, as they were facing above-average pitching skills yet managed to generate a 110 wRC+. The Athletics, on the other hand, generated the same 110 wRC+ as the Rockies, but the quality of competition was entirely different. For the past two months, they’ve had the privilege of teeing off on opponents with an average staff SIERA of 3.84. That is literally like facing a team slightly worse than the Astros (3.83 SIERA) every day for two months.

Contrast that with the task faced by the Brewers and Cardinals so far. To date, the teams faced by those two clubs have posted an aggregate SIERA of 3.58 (Brewers) and 3.62 (Cardinals). On average, that’s like facing a top-10 pitching staff every day for two months. Is it all that surprising, then, that these two teams, widely thought to be above-average offensively when the season began, have struggled to live up to offensive expectations so far?

How does this difference actually affect runs scored? That is a tricky fact to isolate. Drawing a zero-coefficient, least-squares line, each .01 of SIERA has been worth about half of a run so far in 2014. (That rate is comparable to the entire season of 2013, suggesting that this ratio stabilizes fairly quickly). By that measure, as shown in the above table, we would expect their tough schedule to have cost the Brewers almost a win (8 runs) over average in runs scored so far, and almost a win-and-a half as compared to Oakland (15 runs difference). The Cardinals are not far behind.

But that is just the average runs lost, and does not account for the outliers. It probably won’t surprise you to learn that the largest deviations (residuals, technically) from the relatively modest average tend to come from teams at the bottom half of the pitching barrel. When these teams have a bad day, they are really bad, and they are prone to getting blown out. These teams include the White Sox, the Rangers, and the Astros — teams that, as it so happens, have been well-represented on the Athletics’ schedule to date. Certainly, we should expect good teams to blow bad teams out, but when your offensive success consists substantially of beating up bad pitching, it’s hard to say how good your offense really is. The Brewers and Cardinals, on the other hand, have enjoyed healthy servings of the Braves, the Cubs, the Reds, and also each other. All of those teams are in the top half of the league by SIERA, and none of them has a tendency toward outlier scores that allow an opponent to super-size their run differential.

What’s particularly interesting, though, is that this imbalance is about to change in the month of June. Here is how it looks right now:

Opponent SIERA
Lg. Avg. Athletics Rockies Brewers Cardinals
3.73 3.67 3.48 3.87 3.75
AVG RUN EFFECT -3 -13 +7 +1

Things project to be different this month. In June, it is the Brewers’ turn to feast on garbage pitching, as they essentially get to bat against the Astros pitching staff for the entire month (3.87 SIERA). The Cardinals aren’t quite as fortunate, although they still get to face slightly below-average pitching (akin to facing the Rays every day), whereas the Athletics at least have to face a top-half schedule by aggregate SIERA. The poor Rockies, on the other hand, fare worst of all, with a schedule that could not be more grueling: the Braves, Brewers, Cardinals, Dodgers, and Nationals, among others. If the Rockies still come out of June with an above-average wRC+, we can safely say that they are probably a true-talent, above-average ball club, at least when healthy.

The point of all this is not to say that Oakland is some kind of fluke. That team’s out-sized run differential is also a credit to excellent pitching, and it is not Oakland’s fault that it was assigned what turned out to be a favorable early schedule. Yet, this analysis provides yet another reason to be careful when relying upon early-season run differentials.  Before you get too enamored with a team’s production to date, take a close look at the opponents a team has played. You may find that a team’s seemingly-extraordinary results appear to be less so, when you properly weight the skills of the opponents who allowed those results to come about.

Follow Jonathan on Twitter @bachlaw.

Jonathan writes a weekly column about the Brewers at Disciples of Uecker. He has also published at Baseball Prospectus.  




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Jonathan Judge has a degree in piano performance, but is now a product liability lawyer. He has written for Disciples of Uecker and Baseball Prospectus. Follow him on Twitter @bachlaw.


8 Responses to “Feasting on Garbage: Early Strength of Schedule and Team Offense”

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  1. chris says:

    Did you pull put the results from the games against the teams you are comparing?

    So did you pull out the A’s opponent’s results against the A’s? (Same for the other teams.)

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    • bachlaw says:

      Not tabulating results, just difficulty of opponent pitching. These are the weighted SIERAs, in the aggregate, for each opponent of the teams listed above.

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      • Tim A says:

        Those aggregates include the runs the A’s scored against them, which renders the results null. For each team you need to remove the results vs from the equation so the seira is just what they have done against the league sans the team in question.

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        • bachlaw says:

          I disagree. What the Athletics’ opponents did against them is reflective of their skill, particularly when we are talking SIERA, as opposed to runs scored.

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        • Tim A says:

          They blew out the ranger’s and Yu hard, but he still entered the game as the opposing pitcher with a sparkling siera then got torched in under two innings, they rocked a good pitcher, who now has worse stats supporting your theory, based on the team your deriding. You need to look at what the stats were when they entered the matchups for true opponent skill at the time of the event in question, not look at the results after the event, since a team that plays well will always have worse opp siera based on the results of there success.

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    • Tim A says:

      The A’s blowouts I believe are factored in here, so they are hurting themselves being good in this exercise. They also still are running a +84 run differential without the +15 runs you think are gifted to them, which is still more the double the next best team. Turns out scoring the second most runs in MLB while allowing the fewest is a good combination, and the team is actually underperforming there pythag record considerably. 5 shutouts in may for the first time since Connie Mack was running the bench is sexy too.

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      • bachlaw says:

        The A’s certainly are a good team. A wRC+ aggregate analysis (the reverse of what I did) for their pitching would be interesting to look at that side as well. For now, let’s see how their bats hold up as the opposing pitchers go up in skill.

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  2. Sean says:

    “Garbage pitching staff”

    How bout you line your garbage up against the Astros and see which is worse?

    Please stop being so rude and ignorant.

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