Luis Valbuena Is Suddenly A Line-Drive Machine

Despite extremely low ownership rates (5% Yahoo, 3.5% ESPN, 14% CBS), Luis Valbuena has performed well enough so far this season to make himself mixed-league relevant. The 28-year-old currently owns a .289/.390/.461 slash line through 61 games, and is showing no signs of slowing down. He’s fantasy-eligible at both second base and third base, yet fantasy owners would rather own, for example, Kelly Johnson (24% Yahoo, 9% ESPN, 19% CBS), who is hitting .226/.299/.398 by comparison.

Maybe this is a product of the fact that Valbuena has never been good before. After all, even with his 210 plate-appearance sample from this season, he’s still just a .230/.313/.365 career hitter, with 33 homers and five steals in 1,710 PA. That doesn’t sound like a fantasy-relevant player to me. So what’s changed, and how sustainable is it?

The first piece of the puzzle is Valbuena’s .369 batting average on balls in play, which might lead one to think he’s simply getting lucky, especially since his career BABIP sits at .272. However, that .369 BABIP isn’t the product of luck, it’s the product of a 27.3% line-drive rate, the seventh-best in all of baseball. Just take a look at the following chart, thanks to the fine people at Brooks Baseball:

Regardless of pitch type, if he makes contact, he’s making hard contact. However, once you do take a look at pitch types, you see another part of Valbuena’s sudden transformation from a sub-replacement level hitter into a guy with an .852 OPS. Here is a chart of Valbuena’s results by pitch type from 2013:

Pitch Type Count AB K BB HBP 1B 2B 3B HR BAA SLG ISO BABIP
Fourseam 520 79 18 21 2 8 4 0 2 .177 .304 .127 .203
Sinker 476 115 6 17 0 17 5 2 5 .252 .461 .209 .231
Change 161 38 8 4 0 4 3 0 3 .263 .579 .316 .259
Slider 177 42 14 4 1 6 0 0 1 .167 .238 .071 .222
Curve 201 28 16 2 1 2 1 0 1 .143 .286 .143 .273
Cutter 76 17 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 .177 .235 .059 .188
Split 39 13 1 0 0 4 1 0 0 .385 .462 .077 .417
Screwball 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
Slow Curve 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000

…and here are his results from 2014:

Pitch Type Count AB K BB HBP 1B 2B 3B HR BAA SLG ISO BABIP
Fourseam 293 55 12 11 0 10 5 1 2 .327 .564 .236 .390
Sinker 220 46 6 8 0 9 3 0 1 .283 .413 .130 .308
Change 92 19 5 3 0 1 4 0 1 .316 .684 .368 .385
Slider 93 17 6 2 0 1 1 0 0 .118 .177 .059 .182
Curve 114 24 14 3 0 2 2 0 0 .167 .250 .083 .400
Cutter 55 12 1 1 0 3 1 0 0 .333 .417 .083 .364
Split 19 6 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 .333 .333 .000 .667

Well, it sure looks like somebody figured out how to hit fastballs. Let’s take a look at some heat maps to get to the bottom of this, shall we? Pitchers have always attacked Valbuena with fastballs in the lower-outside part of the strike zone, or off the plate outside. Here’s the location map for the fastballs he’s seen in 2014 (I thought about including his career location map as well, but it looks almost exactly the same as this year’s):

Now, let’s compare that with his heat map against fastballs in 2014:

Valbuena has suddenly started hitting fastballs in the exact spot where pitchers have always attacked him with fastballs. It’s admittedly not a large sample, but it is very encouraging data nonetheless. Furthermore, he’s just kept heating up as the season has gone on, and has now sustained an OPS above .900 for two straight months after a slow start in April:

  • April (68 PA) – .218/.368/.327
  • May (90 PA) – .295/.389/.513
  • June (51 PA) – .362/.412/.532

Is Valbuena going to sustain a .369 BABIP all season? Of course not, but as long as he’s hitting a high rate of line drives, he’s going to continue to have mixed-league fantasy value. He’s been performing like a top-12 fantasy second baseman for the last two months, it’s about time we all start taking him a bit more seriously.




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Scott Strandberg started writing for Rotographs in 2013. He is a film critic and entertainment writer for The Norman Transcript newspaper. Scott is also the bassist for North Meets South, and a noted pro wrestling enthusiast. Follow him on Twitter @ScottStrandberg.


6 Responses to “Luis Valbuena Is Suddenly A Line-Drive Machine”

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  1. Eyebrows says:

    Valbuena or Odor while Walker is out?

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  2. MillerTime89 says:

    In a 14-team league, would you still be rostering J.J. Hardy when you have Dee Gordon on your roster and there are guys like Luis Valbuena, Chris Owings, Jordy Mercer, Tommy La Stella, and Kolten Wong available as FAs?

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  3. Charlie says:

    There it is. I was curious on when the Valbuena piece was going to be written. Well done.

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  4. Peter Steele says:

    A little more info was needed:

    1) Only 185 ABs. Does he play often enough to be worth an add? Is his new success getting him more playing time recently?

    2) Also his counting stats are weak in that putrid lineup. Where does he usually hit when he plays?

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  5. philsrule says:

    Counting stats aren’t very weak now: 16 HR in 403 AB (454 PA)! That puts him at 4th among 2B. He showed some pop in the minors (17 HRs with the Indians AAA club in 2011 in 420 AB), so these results don’t seem too strange. It looks like he just took a little longer to adjust to MLB pitching. At 28 years old, he should have some decent years to come.

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  6. Donald Trump says:

    Just dropped Uehara for him.

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