A Call For Civility

This picture, which I cannot source because I cannot find where it came from, and google image search cannot find it for me, speaks to me on many different levels:

civilitycall

1) There are not one but two advertisements for underwear in the background. Underwear! Always a winner.

2) Everyone’s rocking the high socks. All the way down the line.

3) Haberdashery.

4) Gotta be New York, right. And yet it’s baby New York.

5) That billboard on the right. It looks like it reads: “Base Ball Players are all human and therefore … If you want a winning team root for them … they are your friends and while we are here let … so that the ladies may find it pleasant.” Fairly sure that’s a call for civility among the fans, because the players are all human and the ladies want a pleasant game.

Oh, the past, you crack me up.




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Graphs: Baseball, Roto, Beer, brats (OK, no graphs for that...yet), repeat. Follow him on Twitter @enosarris.


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Dan Rozenson
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Dan Rozenson
3 years 2 months ago

Buffalo Bisons and Brooklyn Tip Tops baseball players holding large U.S. flag in Washington Park baseball stadium, Brooklyn, N.Y. Photographed between ca.1908 and ca.1925. Photograph from the George Grantham Bain Collection

http://americanphotoarchive.photoshelter.com/image/I0000m5O3cKLXg5E

olethros
Guest
olethros
3 years 2 months ago

Image source be damned, if there’s a call for civility on the wall, it’s either Philly or the South Side of Chicago.

juan pierres mustache
Guest
3 years 2 months ago

if it was in philly it’d probably read “Base Ball Players are all human and therefore … If you want a winning team please for the love of God stop throwing bottles and vomit at each other”

tylersnotes
Member
3 years 2 months ago

“Base Ball Players are all human and therefore.. If you want a winning team then you should have thought of that… before the Athletics left down…”

CB
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CB
3 years 2 months ago

FYI there is only one underwear ad, I think… The ad in the corner says “Haynes,” not “Hanes,” and judging from the prefatory statement “Drive in a” I’m assuming Haynes is an automaker? (Though I for one have long been in advocate of driving in underwear, aka “committing DIU.”)

Powder Blues
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Powder Blues
3 years 2 months ago

“The Haynes Automobile Company was one of many small companies that built cars in the United States in the first decades of the 20th century. The company was started after Elwood Haynes—supervisor of the Indiana Natural Gas & Oil Company in Kokomo, Ind.—came up with the plan to build a gasoline engined vehicle.”

Adam
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Adam
3 years 2 months ago

The full text of the sign, according to the internet: “Baseball players are all human, and therefore, love applause. If you want a winning team root for them, speak well of them to your friends, and. while we are here, let’s all be clean of speech, that the ladies may find it pleasant to come often.”

John
Member
John
3 years 2 months ago

I want this sign in my house.

I want it in my house s badly.

Keith
Guest
Keith
3 years 2 months ago

Yeah, because we don’t need it to become a huge sausage fest.

Jamie Roth
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Jamie Roth
3 years 2 months ago
John
Guest
John
3 years 2 months ago

It is, in fact, 1915. I did a little research and a quick write-up. It’s a game between the Brooklyn Tip-Tops and the Buffalo Blues!

http://ameasureofsurface.blogspot.com/2013/03/for-gentlemens-consideration.html

Ed Mayo
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Ed Mayo
2 years 6 months ago

Sign’s complete message given — along with an editorial comment — in the May 12, 1914 NY Times (article headline, “Brooklyn Feds Open Home Season”). The “editorial comment” says: “The Brooklyn team is going to train its patrons right. Knowing what some of the fans say about the players and umpires at the Polo Grounds, the Wards are going to put the soft pedal on the general drift of the conversation. They have painted a big sign . . . ” After quoting the sign’s message, the Times says: “There, take that! Now will you be good?”
Full disclosure: my great-grandfather and grandfather were both named Ambrose Hussey, and they are often mentioned in write-ups of Washington Park. They ran the semi-pro Ridgewoods in Brooklyn, and they were also involved in two or three aborted “outlaw” league efforts in the 1910-1913 period. As far as we can tell, they were somehow involved with the Wards, who owned the Brooklyn franchise in the Federal League.

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