Dayn Perry’s Winners Is Not the Loser

At present, yours truly has become somewhat addicted to the foremost social cataloging site for books, Goodreads. As such, I have spent a chunk of time cataloging a fairly comprehensive list of books that I recall reading. When I sorted said list by “avg rating,” there was only one book I expected to find at the very bottom — Winners: How Good Baseball Teams Become Great Ones (And It’s Not The Way You Think), by NotGraphs’ very own Dayn Perry. When Carson introduces Dayn on their various podcasts, he often lists one of Dayn’s books as being “less than serviceable,” and this is the book to which he refers.

But, hark! There is one book that I have graced with my time and my eyeballs that is even less serviceable, according to the Goodreads community:

Winners

Henceforth, let it be known that Winners is not the loser, but merely a loser.




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Paul Swydan is the managing editor of The Hardball Times, a writer and editor for FanGraphs and a writer for Boston.com. He has written for The Boston Globe, ESPN MLB Insider and ESPN the Magazine, among others. Follow him on Twitter @Swydan.


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Well-Beered Englishman
Guest
Well-Beered Englishman
2 years 9 months ago

Looking through your Goodreads list, how is Stieg Larsson ahead of Green Eggs and Ham? And how is Watchmen ahead of Count of Monte Cristo?

Of course, setting aside my mock horror, a lot of these ratings make sense in the context of today’s internet-savvy citizen. And, of course, the eclecticism of your tastes will inevitably create juxtapositions like Jerry Crasnick (3.72) outwriting Jean-Jacques Rousseau (3.70). But I simply do not understand how we can live in a universe where The Cat in the Hat is rated a mere 4.12 of 5.

Alexander Nevermind
Guest
Alexander Nevermind
2 years 9 months ago

That rating is too high for The Cat in the Hat. He wears a string tie that magically just sits on his neck, but no one ever mentions this as if it is a totally normal thing for a cat. But a hat? Yes, that must be pointed out.

Oh, Beepy
Guest
Oh, Beepy
2 years 9 months ago

Sometimes I like to picture a group of people near a punch bowl at a party having the conversation taking place in a comments section.

You sound like a lot of fun.

tylersnotes
Member
2 years 9 months ago

the cat in the hat is a lot like Weezer’s catalog– you should probably be able to appreciate the original on its own merits, but the later bastardized stuff is so terrible as to make the original less pure. plus the increase in popularity of the character has followed in direct contrast to the quality of products utilizing the character. It’s no longer even really possible to like or not like the cat in the hat. you must love or hate it, when the only true just opinion would be to simply acknowledge its existence and move on to the far superior Fox in Socks.

Well-Beered Englishman
Guest
Well-Beered Englishman
2 years 9 months ago

Readerly Invitation
If you could rate one – and only ONE – book, of all the books you have ever read, 6 stars, which book would you award 6 stars?

Royals GM Dayton Moore
Guest
Royals GM Dayton Moore
2 years 9 months ago

Ruben Amaro Jr.
Guest
Ruben Amaro Jr.
2 years 9 months ago

What’s a book?

Royals GM Dayton Moore
Guest
Royals GM Dayton Moore
2 years 9 months ago

I am not sure, but how many prospects would it take to get Michael Young?

olethros
Guest
olethros
2 years 9 months ago

David Quammen’s Song of the Dodo.

Langhorn Clemens
Guest
Langhorn Clemens
2 years 9 months ago

If I must choose among my favorite, Drinking with Boileryard or Ulysses (with Gifford’s annotations), I would choose whiskey, an Irish single malt.

Mike Green
Guest
Mike Green
2 years 9 months ago

Bill James Original Historical Baseball Abstract! What else? Certainly, it’s a better read than the Bible or anything Bill Shakespeare ever wrote.

Seriously, it is pretty much impossible to compare a book that one read 20 years ago with a book one read 2 years ago. A wild stab for me would be Joseph Boyden’s Three Day Road.

Tim Fedorowicz
Guest
Tim Fedorowicz
2 years 9 months ago

“Tickle Me a Feathered Rainbow” by Leonardo Kivehlan

Simon
Guest
Simon
2 years 9 months ago

Georges Perec’s “La vie mode d’emploi” (“Life, a User’s Manual”). Seriously. This is a fucking awesome book.

Who?
Guest
Who?
2 years 9 months ago

I need to read some of his works. Perec’s film Un Homme Qui Dort is one of the best films I’ve seen.

Clip Art
Guest
Clip Art
2 years 9 months ago

“Sex, by Madonna”.

No, reader, I’m not suffering from some sort of aphasia. Those words don’t go together, you might think.

But, for a 12 year old, they did. Brilliantly. If an acceptable goal of literature is to illuminate aspects of the human condition, well then, success.

Patrick Dubuque
Editor
Member
2 years 9 months ago

It’s not a particualrly daring choice, but I’d go with Lolita.

The fact that Nabokov wrote that in his second language is what amazes/depresses/inspires me.

Adam Dunn Dunn Dunn
Guest
Adam Dunn Dunn Dunn
2 years 9 months ago

Not really his second language, more like his adopted first. His parents spoke english (his father was the foreign minister in Kerensky’s government). More like Hobsbawm. Maybe not his native tongue, per se, but a language he grew up famaliar with.

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