Poetry, Translation by Pete Rose

pete-rose-poetry

In which Pete Rose translates towering works of poetry.

In today’s episode, Pete Rose will translate Ezra Pound’s imagist opus “In a Station of the Metro” from the original English into Pete Rose American.

Mr. Pound’s original:

The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
Petals on a wet, black bough.

Mr. Rose’s translation:

The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
Petals on a wet, black bough.
Grocery list: Cigarettes, olive loaf, whore, a plan.

This has been “Poetry, Translation by Pete Rose.”




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Handsome Dayn Perry can be found making love to the reader at CBSSports.com's Eye on Baseball. He is available for all your Twitter needs.

8 Responses to “Poetry, Translation by Pete Rose”

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  1. Ron says:

    Poetry: Translation by Dayn Perry

    In today’s episode, Dayn Perry will translate Ezra Pound’s imagist opus “In a Station of the Metro” from the original English into Dayn Perry American.

    Mr. Pound’s original:

    The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
    Petals on a wet, black bough.

    Mr. Perry’s translation:

    The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
    Petals on a wet, black bough.
    Haw! I’m so intelligent and cultured!

    This has been “Poetry, Translation by Dayn Perry.”

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    • eckmuhl says:

      This could really become a loop without end.

      Poetry: Translation by Ron

      In today’s episode, Ron will translate Ezra Pound’s imagist opus “In a Station of the Metro” from the original English into Ron American.

      Mr. Pound’s original:

      The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
      Petals on a wet, black bough.

      Ron’s translation:

      The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
      Petals on a wet, black bough.
      What self-important nonsense it is to quote beautiful poetry.

      This has been “Poetry, Translation by Ron.”

      Vote -1 Vote +1

  2. Dave Barker says:

    This is the second greatest use of olive loaf in a creative work. The first:

    http://errolmorris.com/commercials/miller/miller_oliveloaf.html

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  3. FamousAmazingGuy says:

    Is it just me, or does Senhor Hustle’s balladry really sing in portuguese?

    Cigarros, pão oliveira, prostituta, um plano.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  4. VC says:

    Addendum to grocery list: Garment scissors to liberate hand from trouser pocket.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  5. The Return of RamboDiaz says:

    Pretty sure that all poems, like ever, could be made to reference back to that image.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  6. Pointless Ponderer says:

    … Quoth The Hustle, “Ravens by 4″

    Vote -1 Vote +1

  7. Bankshot Bobby says:

    It’s an anagram. Pete paid someone to write it for him.

    Vote -1 Vote +1

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