Some Advice on Batting Practice from 1964

For reasons sufficient unto myself, I have been reading a rich tome entitled The Fine Art of Baseball by Lew Watts. It was published in 1964, and I purchased it at a library sale. Library sales, of course, are a sign that the city you live in is going out of business.

In any event, my spirited perusals of Mr. Watts’s book led me to the following championship passage, which is on the subject of batting practice and the systemization thereof:

Asbestos PartyAsbestos Festival

You see, after the balls strike the Heavy Curtain of Asbestos they do indeed “drop harmlessly to the floor.” But what of the carcinogenic flotsam they dislodge and help take to wing? That scarcely merits mentioning.

This is because in 1964 batting practice was, among teams with no access to nets, known colloquially as “cancer practice.”




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Handsome Dayn Perry can be found making love to the reader at CBSSports.com's Eye on Baseball. He is available for all your Twitter needs.


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Dan Rozenson
Guest
2 years 11 months ago

It was only in 1964 that the Surgeon General concluded that inhaling poisonous smoke was bad for your lungs, after all.

Benzedrine
Guest
Benzedrine
2 years 11 months ago

Asbestosis takes about 30 years to manifest as a cancer. So these chaps should have come across their cancers in the Aughts.

MustBunique
Member
Member
2 years 11 months ago

‘Ole Lew laughed at asbestos for his whole life, but in the end it was his slavery to fashion which dictated he could never be seen wearing swimmies that washed his celebrated life down the drain:

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