The Very First All-Stars: Where Are They Now?

The first MLB All-Star Game took place in 1933. We at NotGraphs thought we’d take a look back at the players in the starting lineups and see where they are now.

National League
SP Bill Hallahan, St. Louis — Deceased
C Jimmie Wilson, St. Louis — Deceased
1B Bill Terry, New York — Deceased
2B Frankie Frisch, St. Louis — Deceased
3B Pepper Martin, St. Louis — Deceased
SS Dick Bartell, Philadelphia — Deceased
LF Chick Hafey, Cincinnati — Deceased
CF Wally Berger, Boston — Deceased
RF Chuck Klein, Philadelphia — Deceased

American League
SP Lefty Gomez, New York — Deceased
C Rick Ferrell, Boston — Deceased
1B Lou Gehrig, New York — Deceased
2B Charlie Gehringer, Detroit — Deceased
3B Jimmy Dykes, Chicago — Deceased
SS Joe Cronin, Washington — Deceased
LF Ben Chapman, New York — Deceased
CF Al Simmons, Chicago — Deceased
RF Babe Ruth, New York — Deceased

This does not bode well for the current batch of All-Stars.



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Jeremy Blachman is the author of Anonymous Lawyer, a satirical novel that should make people who didn't go to law school feel good about their life choices. Read more at McSweeney's or elsewhere. He likes e-mail.


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G Fuzz
Guest
G Fuzz

You didn’t answer the question. At which cemeteries can we visit their remains? Or the metaphysical, “where” are “they” “now”? Very lazy research.

triple_r
Member

I always love coming to NotGraphs for the research.

Charlie Hustle
Member
Member
Charlie Hustle

This is very disturbing. Have you looked at any of the more recent classes of All-Stars?

Tony Gwynn & Kirby Puckett
Guest
Tony Gwynn & Kirby Puckett

We’re playing on the same teams with Pepper Martin and Dick Bartell these days. In heaven everyone bats 1.000.

(Which makes for LOOOOOONG games and some absolutely horrid ERAs…)

Burton Cummings
Guest
Burton Cummings

This will cast this year’s All-Star Game in quite a different light.

Jasper Francisco
Member
Member
Jasper Francisco

At the risk of making too much of small samples, it appears that every All-Star eventually dies. Why would teams actively lobby for their players to receive the honor? Perhaps those players who traditionally start slowly have a higher-than-average fear of death and consciously or unconsciously play lousy to avoid the All-Star game?

Jack
Guest
Jack

Alas that these evil days should be ours.

triple_r
Member

All this does is validate Illinois glass M. Michael Sheets’s point.

Illinois glass M. Michael Sheets
Guest
Illinois glass M. Michael Sheets

I would congratulate myself if such an act of ephemeral glee could stem the ubiquitous futility of life in any way.

DerekJeterGiftBasket
Guest
DerekJeterGiftBasket

Well, I know what they would say if they were alive today…

“HELP! HELP! GET ME OUTTA THIS COFFIN!!”

Detroit Michael
Guest
Detroit Michael

Bobby Doerr, who played in the 1941 All-Star game, is still alive. He is the oldest living Hall of Famer too. Everyone who played in All-Star games before then is deceased.

Sorry if that was too informative for a NotGraphs comment!

Mike Green
Guest
Mike Green

“This does not bode well for the current batch of All-Stars.”

…except for Mike Trout.

nickolai
Guest
nickolai

Pffft. Classic newbie error in mistaking correlation with causation.

T
Guest
T

Sounds like the all star game is a dead end.

I'm an idiot
Guest
I'm an idiot

All-stars? More like All-dead.

LHPSU
Guest
LHPSU

They’re not dead, they just became stars in the sky.

Ethan Hunt
Guest
Ethan Hunt

“Wake up, Claire! Jim’s dead! He’s dead! They’re all dead!”

KB
Guest
KB

Did anybody else notice the pattern? Yeah, lots of St. Louis and New York players.

dr0q
Guest
dr0q

Vallstar morghulis.

Dr. McCoy
Guest
Dr. McCoy

They’re dead, Jim.

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