20 Agents?

If the case against Barry Bonds was as good as everyone says it is, why are the feds scorching the Earth in order to try and get the testimony of someone they’ve know ain’t talking for years?

FBI and IRS agents raided the home of Greg Anderson’s mother-in-law Wednesday in what Anderson’s attorney said was a tactic to ratchet up the pressure on his client to testify for the government in the upcoming Barry Bonds perjury trial. Mark Geragos, Anderson’s attorney, said 20 IRS and FBI agents raided the Redwood City, Calif., home of Madeleine Gestas, the mother of Greg Anderson’s wife . . .

. . . “Monday they faxed a letter, demanding to know whether [Anderson] was going to testify,” said Geragos, adding that last week the government issued a subpoena for Anderson to appear at the trial. “They’re acting like the Gestapo. Even the Mafia spares the women and children.”

“It’s such a blatant and transparent attempt to intimidate Greg,” Geragos said. “It makes you wonder whether you’re living in the Soviet Union.” . . .

. . . The New York Times has reported that prosecutors have been threatening to bring tax-related charges against Gestas. Soon after Bonds was indicted in late 2007, Anderson’s wife, Nicole, received a target letter from federal prosecutors.

Bonds did steroids. I think he probably also lied about it. That doesn’t change the fact that the way in which the feds have handled this case represents a serious misallocation of scarce prosecutorial resources at best, an abuse of prosecutorial power at worst.


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The Common Man
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The Common Man

Eww.  This story makes me feel queasy.  Worse yet, it’s making me start to feel bad for people who willingly associate with Barry Bonds.  And twenty agents?  Aren’t there better uses for that many people?  Like investigating alien abductions or government conspiracies (everything I know about the FBI, I learned from watching X-Files)?  Someone tell the Obama administration that we’ve identified a wasteful and ineffective government program ready for the chopping block.  Craig, how long is this prosecutor going to be able to continue his case? Does his “term” as a federal prosecutor ever expire? 

http://www.the-common-man.com

Craig Calcaterra
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Craig Calcaterra
U.S Attorneys typically serve at the pleasure of the president and tend to be replaced when a new administration comes in.  That said, it’s not typical to see pending cases—especially cases close to trial as is this one—dropped upon a change of command unless there is a clear political shift on the underlying issue that renders the prosecution anathema to the new presidents policies.  I don’t think that applies here inasmuch as Obama has not, much to my chagrin, pledged to stop the War on Drugs. As for a continuance: they get granted all of the time for any number… Read more »
pete
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pete

Agreed, TCM: time for Obama to get out that scalpel.

MooseinOhio
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MooseinOhio

I hope the feds go after some of these Wall Street folks with the same vigor.

Jack Marshall
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Jack Marshall
I don’t understand your theory. Until Bonds is proven guilty in a court and punished, he will stand as an example that you can cheat, lie, cover up, and make millions, break records, and suffer no adverse consequences whatsoever. Until he is nailed, a substantial number of misguided fans will defend him as a victim. Lying to a grand jury is a serious offense. Impeding a federal investigation is a serious offense. High-profile celebrity drug-users are poison to the culture. Were you this indignant over Scooter Libby? I’m a former prosecutor. If there was no probable cause for the raid,… Read more »
Wally
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Wally
“I hope the feds go after some of these Wall Street folks with the same vigor. “ No kidding.  We basically print money to save these failing banks, then the banks go on to give out some of the largest bonuses in their history,  while not lending the money out as they were supposed to do. And we still care about a guy that might have lied about taking steroids in order to hit a few more HRs……hello?  Do we have any priorities? I’d like to know the final number on government spending for this steroids witch hunt that has… Read more »
Craig Calcaterra
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Craig Calcaterra
“Until Bonds is proven guilty in a court and punished, he will stand as an example that you can cheat, lie, cover up, and make millions, break records, and suffer no adverse consequences whatsoever.” I wasn’t aware that he was on trial for using drugs or breaking baseball’s rules. I certainly hope the U.S. Attorney isn’t using this prosecution for those purposes, because I find that to be a misuse of scarce prosecutorial resources.  As for the lying and covering up, I wasn’t aware that that had been judged already.  We all have our opinions about that—I think he probably… Read more »
Craig Calcaterra
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Craig Calcaterra
The indictment was brought in late 2007, and it was a bad indictment that had to be redone twice. That’s the prosecution’s fault, and they brought the bad indictment after having three years or so to put it together. I don’t see what Bonds has done to drag this out at all.  Yes, we can suspect that Bonds is behind Anderson’s refusal to testify, but those are some pretty serious charges, and I’m not prepared to lodge them against Bonds absent something more than the application of Occam’s Razor. As to your main point, I don’t think the government should… Read more »
Jack Marshall
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Jack Marshall
Craig, I do admire your objectivity. Undoubtedly, the degree of resources being devoted to nailing Bonds is excessive, and you have it exactly correc: it doesn’t amount to a Rule 3.8 violation, but that doesn’t make it right. I admit that my focus is Bonds. He doesn’t deserve any sympathy if an excessive effort nails him for perjury he is eventually proven to have committed. And personally, I’ll be very glad to see, if it comes to that, a legal verdict that says, once and for all, Barry Bonds used PEDs,knew it, and has been lying all along. And I… Read more »
Jack Marshall
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Jack Marshall
Yes, Bonds hasn’t been judged in court. In the court of common sense, based on the evidence, circumstantial or otherwise, he has been judged guilty of using PED’s. You said so yourself. And there’s nothing wrong with coming to an obvious conclusion. He will be tried for perjury, in connection with obstructing a federal investigation. I think it’s a bit disingenuous to call this a simple perjury prosecution, any more than the prosecution of Scooter Libby or Martha Stewart were. The prosecution of Al Capone was not a simple tax prosecution either. I do believe that Bonds is being prosecuted… Read more »
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