Andy Pettitte Returns to New York

In the surprise move of the spring to date, Andy Pettitte is returning to the Yankees for another season. As Jack Curry of YES first reported, Pettitte has signed a minor-league contract with the Yankees that could potentially pay $2.5 million this season. Although Pettitte likely won’t be ready to start the season with the Yankees — he’ll need extended spring training or a minor league stint to get his arm strength built up — he should add another quality arm in Joe Girardi‘s starting rotation.

Pitchers — or any player — who take seasons off can be tough to project. Was Pettitte staying in shape? Will his arm respond as well to the spring training program as it did in past years? Combine these questions with Pettitte’s age — he turns 40 in June — and it’s fair to have concerns about Pettitte’s ability to come in and bolster the Yankees’ rotation.

But the Yankees lose very little if Pettitte is unable to get his arm back in shape, and if he can get healthy and stay healthy, it’s difficult to imagine him having a bad season, simply because he has never really had one before. Maybe the closest one was 2008, when the lefty posted a 4.54 ERA, his only worse-than-average mark of his career. But that year, he still managed a 2.9 strikeout-to-walk ratio and a 3.71 FIP. In his 16 MLB seasons, not once did Pettitte post a FIP higher than the league average (as measured by FIP-).

And in reality, average is probably all the Yankees need to get from Pettitte. An average Pettitte would allow the Yankees to push Phil Hughes to the bullpen (where he has excelled, albeit in a small sample) and Freddy Garcia (already dealing with a hand injury) to a long relief role. The depth in the rotation would be fantastic and should protect against all but the most dire injury situations. Most importantly, Pettitte would make five probable above-average starters when grouped with CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, Michael Pineda and Ivan Nova.

It was easy to think Pettitte had something left when he retired on the heels of a 3.28 ERA in 2010. Now he’ll get to prove it.



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J
Guest
J

Don’t like the move. The guy had no wins last year and didn’t strike anyone out. He was a zero WAR pitcher! I mean, come on…

Dermatio
Guest
Dermatio

All that but a zero ERA and WHIP though.

J
Guest
J

I’m no mathmetician, nor can I even spell mathmetician correctly. But isn’t 0/0 infinity? Which would be even worse.

Eminor3rd
Guest
Eminor3rd

0/0 is either infinity or 1. That’s either a really amazing HR/9 or a horrendous. I think it’s safe to say, from the numbers, that this is a boom or bust move.

AndyS
Guest
AndyS

OR! It could be negative infinity!

Al Dimond
Guest

The only quantities defined surrounding a quotient with zero in the denominator, generally, are limits of the quotient as the denominator approaches zero. If the numerator is positive, the limit as the denominator approaches zero from the positive side is positive infinity, and the limit as the denominator approaches zero from the negative side is negative infinity. If the numerator is negative, the opposite of these are true. The common belief that 1/0 = infinity is not true, the IEEE floating-point specification notwithstanding.

When the numerator and denominator are both zero, even the limit of the quotient cannot be defined. It is, in fact, possible to define functions f(x) and g(x), where f(0) = g(0) = 0, that give arbitrary values for limits of f(x)/g(x) as x approaches 0.

jon
Guest
jon

Actually 0/0 could conceivably be any number if examined in the limit.

James Gentile
Member

Are you guys going to the outer space convention tonight?

dick
Guest
dick

0/0 is just infinity. dividing by zero superseeds all other operations.

My echo and bunnymen
Guest
My echo and bunnymen

I love that I’m relearning the first semester of calculus on a baseball forum. :)

Davor
Guest
Davor

Actually, 0xn=0, n/inf=0, n/0=inf and nxinf=inf are set rules (ignoring +\-). None can superseed another. So, 0/0, 0xinf and inf/inf are undefined and can be anything from zero to infinity. They have to be further analyzed, but I think that in case of ERA any analysis would leave them undefined.

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