FanGraphs Audio: Both Insult and Injury with Aaron Gleeman

Episode 442
Aaron Gleeman is a contributor to NBC’s Hardball Talk and longtime proprietor of AaronGleeman.com. He’s also the guest on this edition of FanGraphs Audio — during which episode he relates all the damage he’s caused.

Don’t hesitate to direct pod-related correspondence to @cistulli on Twitter.

You can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or other feeder things.

Audio after the jump. (Approximately 1 hr 1 min play time.)

We hoped you liked reading FanGraphs Audio: Both Insult and Injury with Aaron Gleeman by Carson Cistulli!

Please support FanGraphs by becoming a member. We publish thousands of articles a year, host multiple podcasts, and have an ever growing database of baseball stats.

FanGraphs does not have a paywall. With your membership, we can continue to offer the content you've come to rely on and add to our unique baseball coverage.

Support FanGraphs




Carson Cistulli has published a book of aphorisms called Spirited Ejaculations of a New Enthusiast.

newest oldest most voted
texgator
Guest
texgator

Fun podcast. I feel the need to correct some of the misinformaton regarding Judaism, however.

The swaying back and forth that Aaron mentioned in not called “davening”…that is the Yiddish term for praying….it is called “shuckeling”. However, one is not required to “shuckle” when praying, some of the greatest Rabbis in history didn’t shuckle. It is just something that many Jews do while praying in order to intensify their concentration. Jews do stand, sit and even bow from the waist during prayer. Once a year, on Yom Kippur, we fully prostrate to the ground. There is no kneeling.
Ecclisiastes is not part of the Torah, really. It is part of Tanakh, which many might refer to as Torah, but nominally Torah refers to the 5 books of Moses and the Talmud only. The author of Ecc. is King Solomon. Carson said it is part of what is refered to as “wisdom writings”. I believe he is confusing this with another of King Solomon’s writings, “Proverbs”. Ecclisastes falls under the “Writings” segment of of Tanakh.