The FanGraphs Top 200 Prospect List

Yesterday, we gave you a little bit of a tease, giving you a glimpse into the making of FanGraphs Top 200 Prospect List. This morning, however, we present the list in its entirety, including scouting grades and reports for every prospect rated as a 50 Future Value player currently in the minor leagues. As discussed in the linked introduction, some notable international players were not included on the list, but their respective statuses were discussed in yesterday’s post. If you haven’t read any of the prior prospect pieces here on the site, I’d highly encourage you to read the introduction, which explains all of the terms and grades used below.

Additionally, I’d be remiss if I didn’t point you towards our YouTube channel, which currently holds over 600 prospect videos, including all of the names near the top of this list. Players’ individual videos are linked in the profiles below as well.

And lastly, before we get to the list, one final reminder that a player’s placement in a specific order is less important than his placement within a Future Value tier. Numerical rankings can give a false impression of separation between players who are actually quite similar, and you shouldn’t get too worked up over the precise placement of players within each tier. The ranking provides some additional information, but players in each grouping should be seen as more or less equivalent prospects.

If you have any questions about the list, I’ll be chatting today at noon here on the site (EDIT: here’s the chat transcript), and you can find me on Twitter at @kileymcd.

Alright, that’s enough stalling. Let’s get to this.

70 FV Prospects (Tier of 2)

1. Kris Bryant, 3B, Chicago Cubs
More: Full Report & Video
Hit: 40/50+, Raw Power: 75/80, Game Power: 55/70, Run: 50/45, Field: 40/45+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 70
Scouting Report: Bryant is the top prospect in the game for me and for a majority of sources I talked to, but it isn’t by a landslide. Bryant still has some questions, and the guy right behind him could be terrifyingly good. Bryant has either 75 or 80 raw power for scouts, but the two questions about him are 1) how much contact he’ll make/how much of his power will he get to in games, and 2) if he will play third base or right field. The thing that created both of these question is the length of his 6-foot-5, 215 lb. frame, which also creates his power, so you have to take the good with the bad — and there’s plenty of good.

2. Byron Buxton, CF, Minnesota Twins
More: Full Report & Video
Hit: 30/60, Raw Power: 50/55, Game Power: 30/55, Run: 80/80, Field: 65/70, Throw: 65/65, FV: 70
Scouting Report: Buxton was the consensus top prospect in the game last year, but had a mix of freak and regular injuries that limited him to under 200 plate appearances, including the Arizona Fall League. You can mostly throw out his mediocre-for-Buxton numbers from this year, because the tools are still there, which puts in context how good he was in 2013. He hit above league average at High-A at age 20 and it was seen as a disappointment; if he can stay healthy and perform like healthy he did, he could be a dynamic All-Star talent as soon as 2015’s stretch run, but more likely in 2016.

65 FV Prospects (Tier of 6)

3. Addison Russell, SS, Chicago Cubs
More: Full Report & Video
Hit: 40/55, Raw Power: 60/60, Game Power: 40/55, Run: 55/55, Field: 50/55, Throw: 55/55, FV: 65
Scouting Report: Russell was known to scouts early in his high school career, then he added a lot of weight in the summer before his draft year, causing most to project him as a third baseman. Russell didn’t like hearing this, so he dropped all the weight by his draft spring, losing some 65 or 70 raw power, but becoming a plus runner with a good chance to stick at shortstop. He went 11th overall to Oakland and surprised from day one with how advanced he was offensively, while continuing to improve defensively. He was dealt to the Cubs last year in the Jeff Samardzija deal and joins a glut of talented young hitters for the Cubs. The biggest remaining question for Russell is if he can still stick at shortstop due to a hitch in his release that limits how quickly he can unload the ball deep in the hole.

4. Julio Urias, LHP, Los Angeles Dodgers
More: Full Report & Video
Fastball: 60/65, Curveball: 60/65, Changeup: 55/60, Command: 45/55, FV: 65
Scouting Report: The Mexican-born Urias signed when he turned 16 in August 2012, as part of a package deal from his Mexican team, where he was the headline player, signing for $1.0 million (the Dodgers paid another $800,000 for the other players in the package). The Dodgers brass signed Urias after a famous trip to Mexico. They went to see his teammate C Julian Leon (a solid prospect in his own right), but the 15-year-old Urias sat 90-92 mph with a loose delivery, crisp curveball and good feel to pitch. Later on that same trip, the Dodgers also signed Yasiel Puig, making it one of the most notable scouting trips of all time. The reason Urias was still available what that he had a serious condition in his left eye (and still does–check out his official photo) after a tumor was removed, and some teams were worried about future blindness, though it doesn’t appear to be a problem now. Urias now sits in the low to mid-90’s and touches 97 mph with three plus pitches and advanced command, and he’s still just 18. He’ll start 2015 in Double-A and when he’s called up is simply a function of when the Dodgers want to start his arbitration clock, because we haven’t seen him fail yet, so we don’t even fully know his ceiling.

5. Carlos Correa, SS, Houston Astros
More: Full Report & Video
Hit: 20/60, Raw Power: 60/65, Game Power: 20/55, Run: 55/50, Field: 50/55, Throw: 65/65, FV: 65
Scouting Report: Correa was seen as a consensus top-three pick in the 2012 draft, but only a portion of the scouting community had him as the top prospect in the draft. The Astros saw him as the best talent and also saw an opportunity to capitalize on this perception (with Buxton seen as the consensus top prospect) to cut a below-slot deal with Correa, allowing them to sign two high schoolers — 3B Rio Ruiz (#43 on this list, since traded to Atlanta in the Evan Gattis deal) and RHP Lance McCullers (#126) — to over-slot deals later in the draft. Correa has really performed since signing and hasn’t added the weight many expected to come and force a move to third base. His 2014 season ended early with a broken fibula, but he’s been back to 100 percent for over a month and is expected to be ready to head to Double-A to start the year.

6. Corey Seager, 3B, Los Angeles Dodgers
More: Video
Hit: 40/55, Raw Power: 55/60, Game Power: 40/55, Run: 45/40, Field: 50/50+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 65
Scouting Report: Seager is the younger brother of Mariners 3B Kyle Seager and, in the last few years, both have emerged as a couple of the best infielders in the world. Corey was identified as such earlier, as he went in the middle of the first round in 2012 out of a Charlotte-area high school, but even the Dodgers were surprised by how much and how quickly Seager excelled offensively. He hasn’t failed in any meaningful way yet, including an impressive late-season run in 2014 at Double-A at age 20. If you have to nitpick, the strikeouts are a little higher than some would like, but Seager is 6-foot-4 and that’s to be expected if a bigger guy is going to hit for some power. The Dodgers think Seager is fringy to average defensively at shortstop and will try to keep him there as long as possible, but he should slide over to third base at some point in the next year or two.

7. Lucas Giolito, RHP, Washington Nationals
More: Full Report & Video
Fastball: 65/70, Curveball: 60/70, Changeup: 45/55, Command: 45/50+, FV: 65
Scouting Report: Giolito was nationally known by scouts all the way back to when he hit 95 mph at age 15 and he dominated over the summer and winter leading up to his draft year; he was in the running to go 1-1 as one of the top prep pitchers of all-time. His draft year, however, was cut short by a sprained UCL in his elbow that led to Tommy John surgery. The stuff was all the way back this year as he dominated Low-A in his age-19 season in his first full year coming off of surgery. The Nationals were understandably conservative with pitch and innings counts in 2014, wanting to keep Giolito at the same level in a low stress environment so he wouldn’t go too deep in innings/games or be tempted to reach back for the 100 mph heater he’s thrown many times before. Giolito will start in High-A this year and the reigns will be loosened, with an expectation that he’ll get promoted to Double-A at some point in 2015, with the majors only a phone call away.

8. Carlos Rodon, LHP, Chicago White Sox
More: Full Report & Video
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 60/70, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 45/50, FV: 65
Scouting Report: Rodon was a notable prospect out of high school, but had a 3rd-4th round grade from most teams, as the fastball sat around 90, there was no projection and some teams had him off the board due to a back issue. His velocity spiked soon after he got to campus at NC State and he was sitting 92-95 mph and flashing a plus-plus slider en route to a dominating freshman season that began hype that Rodon would go #1 overall in 2014. He hit some bumps along the way and only showed flashes of his ultra premium stuff in his draft year, but it all came back after signing, due in part to his overuse in college and his reliance on his knockout slider. He’ll likely start in Triple-A, and should be up at some point this year. He has frontline starter potential, but he’s also shown flashes of a more ordinary pitcher in recent years.

60 FV Prospects (Tier of 20)

9. Blake Swihart, C, Boston Red Sox
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/55, Raw Power: 50/50+, Game Power: 30/50, Run: 45/45+, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Swihart was seen as an amateur as an offense-first catcher that probably would have to move to a corner position once he got to the upper levels of the minors when Boston took him 26th overall out of a New Mexico high school. He’s made a lot a strides defensively since then, now projecting as s solid average defender with a plus arm and above average athleticism. Swihart’s bat is still advanced and he’s developed more game power in the past few years, with scouts expecting about 15-18 homers at maturity, with an MLB look likely coming at some point in 2015.

10. J.P. Crawford, SS, Philadelphia Phillies
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 45/50, Game Power: 20/45+, Run: 60/60, Field: 50/55, Throw: 55/55, FV: 60
Scouting Report: J.P. Crawford is a cousin of Carl Crawford, but you don’t need to know his bloodlines to to know he’s a premium athlete. He is a plus runner with smooth hands, good range and an above average arm, giving him a very good chance to stick at shortstop long-term. Scouts are pleasantly surprised by how well Crawford has hit since turning pro and he’s now on the fast track. He turns 20 soon and will get a taste of Double-A next year, possibly to start the year, with a 2016 big league cup of coffee in range if he keeps progressing.

11. Joc Pederson, RF, Los Angeles Dodgers
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 45/55, Raw Power: 60/60, Game Power: 45/55, Run: 55/50, Field: 50/50+, Throw: 50/50+, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Pederson signed for $600,000 in the 11th round of the 2010 draft from a Northern California high school; he wasn’t a consensus prospect and wasn’t seen as having much upside, but flashed average tools and good feel for the game. Something clicked in 2012 and the Dodgers sent him straight to High-A as a 20-year-old, where he became a top 100 type prospect. He raked again in Double-A in 2013, then again in 2014 in Triple-A, with only the Dodgers outfield surplus keeping him on the farm so long. Pederson has average to above average tools across the board, with only his raw power showing plus, though that’s with effort in batting practice. He can play a solid center field for now, but likely settles as a right fielder when he matures. His offensive projection will come down to what kind of hitter he wants to be–the 55 future hit/power tools is a little conservative and converts to .270s and 20 homers–but his controlled aggressive approach should lead to high OBPs either way.

12. Tyler Glasnow, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates
More: Video
Fastball: 65/70, Curveball: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/50, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Glasnow was drafted in the 5th round out of high school in 2011 as a low-profile pure projection bet with fringy to average stuff and a limited track record. He blew up in 2013, dominating Low-A with a fastball that hit 97 mph. He continued his progress at High-A in 2014, sitting 93-96 mph and hitting 98 mph, with a plus curveball and improving changeup. Glasnow’s long limbs create some command challenges, but his walks were more a function of deep counts due to swing-and-miss stuff than trouble throwing strikes. He’ll head to Double-A for 2015 and likely won’t get a big league look until 2016, but there’s #2 starter upside, with less risk each the day.

13. Jorge Soler, RF, Chicago Cubs
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 50/60, Game Power: 55/65, Raw Power: 65/65, Run: 50/45, Field: 45/45+, Throw: 55/55, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Soler is a fun player to watch. He’s an explosive quick-twitch power hitter with easy plus bat speed and raw power, along with just enough huge cuts and erratic stuff to his game that you never know what you might see. The erratic aspects of his game slowly melted away this year as he matured mentally and had his first full year of reps in the system with a clean bill of health. He was great in a big league audition in 2014 and is the classic power right field profile, with some comparing Soler at the plate to Yasiel Puig.

14. Francisco Lindor, SS, Cleveland Indians
More: Video
Hit: 40/60, Raw Power: 40/40, Game Power: 30/40, Run: 60/60, Field: 55/60, Throw: 60/60, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Lindor had lots of late helium before the 2011 draft, with some talk he could go in the top three, but the Indians happily scooped him up with the 8th pick. He’s met or exceeded expectation since then, with plenty of contact, speed and defense to comfortably project as an everyday player with a likely 2015 big league look. The only real questions are how much power there will be and if the bat is truly impact level, but Elvis Andrus has shown that there’s still a way to get get plenty rich even without an impact-level bat.

15. Miguel Sano, 3B, Minnesota Twins
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/50, Raw Power: 80/80, Game Power: 55/70, Run: 45/40, Field: 40/45+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Sano missed all of 2014 with Tommy John surgery but was fully ready to play this winter. He had a very high profile July 2nd signing process, complete with a controversial documentary, accusations of falsifying his age, bone scans and a surprise late entrant scooping up the player. Sano was seen as a once-in-a-generation talent with 80 raw power and the ability to stay in the infield to go with an advanced feel for hitting. That’s all still true, but Sano has added a lot of strength — he’s at least 6-foot-4, 240 lbs. now and likely will get even bigger. As such, most scouts now assume he’ll end up at first base in a few years. He’ll head to Double-A or Triple-A to start 2015 and should get a big league look late in the season if he proves everything is fully back.

16. Joey Gallo, 3B, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/45, Game Power: 60/70, Raw Power: 80/80, Speed: 40/40, Field: 45/50, Throw: 70/70, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Gallo became famous to mainstream baseball fans for his power display during the 2014 Futures Game, where he showed off legit top-of-the-scale 80 raw power. Scouts I talked to say what they see day-to-day from Gallo in batting practive is more of a 70, which is more in line with what they think he could produce in the big leagues (70 game power translates to 30-35 homers annually) since there are still some questions about his contact ability. That said, Gallo raked this year at age 20 in Double-A and has never had trouble putting up gaudy numbers, so it’s hard to say he won’t hit enough to be a solid everyday player of some kind. He’s fringy at third base but also has enormous arm strength and scouts think he’ll figure out a way to stick over there, though Adrian Beltre may force him to right field as long as he’s in Arlington.

17. Daniel Norris, LHP, Toronto Blue Jays
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 55/60, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 45/50+,Command: 45/50+, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Norris was a well-known prospect coming out of a Tennessee high school, both for his above-average stuff dating back to his sophomore year, as well as his troublesome delivery. He slipped to the second round in 2011, but the Jays scooped him up at the 74th overall pick with a $2 million bonus. The Jays development staff a couple years to clean everything up and unlock Norris’ athleticism, but he shot from High-A to the big leagues in 2014 alongside CF Dalton Pompey (#80 on this list). Norris runs his fastball up to 96 mph with above average to plus off-speed pitches and good feel to pitch; there’s #2/3 starter upside and he likely won’t spend much more time in the minors.

18. Mark Appel, RHP, Houston Astros
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 55/65, Changeup: 50/60, Command: 40/50, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Appel was a polarizing figure in the 2012 draft, when he went 8th overall and didn’t sign with the Pirates, turning down a $3.8 million offer. Scouts liked the size and stuff but thought Appel wasn’t quite athletic enough to make his delivery work and lacked the aggressiveness and killer instinct to be a frontline arm. Appel answered these questions in 2013, with an improved approach and the Astros took the Houston native #1 overall. He had some trouble in 2014 with his velocity disappearing then coming back, and he still isn’t all the way back to his peak form as a senior at Stanford. The pitch grades above are a notch higher than what he consistently showed last year, but there’s no physical reason to think he can’t regain that form and become a #2 starter.

19. Noah Syndergaard, RHP, New York Mets
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 65/70, Curveball: 50/55, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 45/50+, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Syndergaard was just starting to grow into his 6-foot-6, 240 lb. frame when the Blue Jays took him in the 2010 sandwich round as a late pop-up arm off many teams’ radars, due to a velocity spike before the draft. He has shot through the minors, reaching Triple-A by 21 while growing a few inches, putting on lots of strength, developing his command and having his stuff explode. He was dealt in a package with Travis d’Arnaud from Toronto in the R.A. Dickey trade in December of 2012. He now sits 93-97 with heavy life and hits 98 mph with a curveball that is mostly above average, but still varies outing to outing. Syndergaard also has been more open to using his changeup than Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler at the same stage, with the pitch flashing above average pretty consistently already. Syndergaard’s weakness is a lack of a consistent plus secondary pitch, but he does everything well and will get a big league look in 2015 with a good chance to reach his mid-rotation potential.

20. Alex Jackson, RF, Seattle Mariners
More: Video
Hit: 20/60, Raw Power: 65/65, Game Power: 20/60, Run: 45/45, Field: 45/50, Throw: 60/60, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Jackson was known as a sophomore in high school as he showed and advanced feel to hit, big raw power and a huge arm behind the plate. He held that lofty perch until his draft year, as a legitimate contender to go #1 overall, but ultimately slipped to the Mariners at 6th overall. Jackson has easy plus raw power and arm strength, but the separator here is his advanced feel to hit to all fields and get to his power in games. Like Wil Myers and Bryce Harper before him and Kyle Schwarber (#21 on this list) from his draft class, Jackson’s bat is too advanced to wait on his glove to develop behind the plate, so the Mariners will just stick him in right field and let him hit his way to the big leagues.

21. Kyle Schwarber, LF, Chicago Cubs
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/55, Raw Power: 70/70, Game Power: 40/60, Run: 40/40, Field: 40/45+, Throw: 50/50, FV: 60
Scouting Report: When I first saw Schwarber last summer on a loaded college Team USA, I thought the middle linebacker-looking dude wasn’t a good bet to stick at catcher, but he was surprisingly nimble for his size with enough ability to at least consider it. I wrote that he was good enough back there to allow him to play there in the minors and develop him as a potential backup that plays once or twice a week but is a primary at left field or first base. The Cubs took him #4 overall out of Indiana and agree with my defensive suggestion; they’ll develop him as a catcher this year, but most assume his bat will be ready before his glove, meaning he’ll be a part-time catcher at best. There’s legit 30 homer power and surprising feel to hit with a realistic chance for a big league look in late 2016.

22. Dylan Bundy, RHP, Baltimore Orioles
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/65, Curveball: 55/60, Cutter: 60/70, Changeup: 45/55, Command: 45/50+, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Bundy was a known prospect as a sophomore in high school, if not earlier, and the Orioles knew about him early; they signed his older brother Bobby in 2008 before drafting Dylan in 2011. It’s expected his borderline insane usage in high school is what led to his June 2013 Tommy John surgery after soreness in March of that year. The linked video is pre-surgery when Bundy-mania was at it’s height: he sat 95-99 mph with an 80 cutter, plus curveball and solid average changeup. In 41.1 innings last year at the A-Ball levels, Bundy was mostly 90-93, hitting 94 mph with the command and curveball not close to what they once were. Later in the summer, he hit 96 mph and the curve and command were getting there, but he was shut down with an oblique problem, unrelated to his arm. He is expected to have stuff close to his peak this year, but you can see from the above grades I’ve hedged a bit until we actually see it. This year is his last option, so he has to stick on the big league roster in 2016 or be exposed to waivers, which he would not clear.

23. Eduardo Rodriguez, LHP, Boston Red Sox
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 50/60, Command: 45/50, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Rodriguez was acquired from the Orioles at the trade deadline for lefty reliever Andrew Miller, with lots of rumors suggested they chose Rodriguez over a multi-player offer from Detroit headlined by #29 on this list, RHP Jake Thompson. Rodriguez went from a solid lefty prospect that projected as a #4 type starter to a potential frontline guy a couple weeks before the trade when his velocity ticked up to sitting 93-96 mph, which also sharpened his slider. The question is if this new stuff is here to stay, but even if it isn’t, Rodriguez could be a league average or better starter by 2016.

24. Jose Berrios, RHP, Minnesota Twins
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Curveball: 55/60, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 45/50, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Berrios may not be big at 6-foot-0/190 pounds, but scouts rave about his athleticism, makeup and work ethic. His velocity has slowly improved since high school in Puerto Rico and now sits at 93-96, hitting 98 mph. There isn’t a ton of plane or life to the pitch, but his clean arm action and deceptively easy delivery helps the heater sneak up on hitters. Berrios calls his breaking pitches a slow and fast curveball, but the fast one plays like a slider and both are above average; scouts will call one or the other plus depending on the day, but the slower curve gets the better grade more often. His changeup is above average and may be plus one day, helping to keep hitters off his fastball. One scout compared him to Javier Vazquez and he should get a big league look at some point in 2015.

25. Robert Stephenson, RHP, Cincinnati Reds
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 65/70, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/45+, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Stephenson surprisingly slipped to the end of the 1st round out of high school and has done what most scouts thought he would, turning a crazy loose arm into premium stuff in short order. This year was a struggle for Stephenson as he hadn’t really failed before, but at age-21 as more of a thrower than pitcher in Double-A, even plus stuff and a heater that hits 100 mph wouldn’t allow him to carve hitters up as he was accustomed. Stephenson will need to make that adjustment next season, but there are more than enough ingredients here for a mid-rotation starter, with a decent chance for even more. One scout compared Stephenson’s developmental path and possible eventual outcome to Homer Bailey. The command isn’t really the issue, so much as it is usage of his pitches, getting into good counts and challenging hitters in the right way, not always with a flat upper-90?s fastball up in the zone.

26. Luis Severino, RHP, New York Yankees
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 65/70, Slider: 40/50+, Changeup: 50/60, Command: 40/50, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Severino wasn’t a high profile signing, but stood out to me in instructs the fall after his 2012 stint in the Dominican Summer League. He sat 92-94 mph in both outings I saw and threw a solid average slider, but didn’t work in a changeup and his delivery/command needed work. Severino was mostly 91-95 mph in 2013 and early in 2014, then got stronger as the year went on, flashing 94-97 mph heat at times later in the year and sustaining it for innings. Severino took quickly to using a changeup regularly after arriving in America, developing it as a plus pitch in about a year of using it, though it can sometimes play to 55 on certain days, as he’s still developing consistent control of his off-speed offerings. His slider is still a third pitch, but it flashes 55 at times. He’s quickly improved and developed starter traits, but on certain days the stuff, command and delivery may all look more like a reliever.

27. Alex Gonzalez, RHP, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 55/60, Curveball: 45/50, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Gonzalez went from a 3rd-4th round prospect entering his draft year at Oral Roberts to a legit 1st rounder by mid-season, with some buzz he could sneak into the top 10 on a discounted deal; he went 23rd. His heavy sinker has led to solid performances in the minors thus far, and his stuff has ticked up a notch this season. Gonzalez now sits 92-95, hitting 97 mph often and can spot and manipulate the pitch to sink, run or cut it at 94 mph deep into starts. His plus mid-80’s slider is still the primary weapon and his changeup and fourth option curveball both flash average to slightly above at times. Gonzalez’s command isn’t bad and should be average as well, giving Gonzalez #3 starter upside, but scouts complain that with his firm changeup, almost every pitch he throws is over 85 mph and often in the strike zone.

28. Jon Gray, RHP, Colorado Rockies
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 50/60, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/45+, FV: 60
Scouting Report: Gray created tons of buzz midway through the 2013 spring with Oklahoma, coming from out of nowhere to hit 100 mph often, with a plus slider and usable changeup. He was in the mix for the #1 overall pick but ended up going 3rd overall to Colorado. Since signing, Gray’s velocity has been down some, mostly sitting 91-94 and hitting 95 mph, but Rockies sources say this is intentional and he’s working on some things (they already smoothed out his delivery), which scouts assumed after Gray hit 98 mph in a short Texas League All-Star Game appearance. I think he’ll settle at 92-94 with more movement and command, with the slider still plus and the changeup having it’s moments. Scouts are a little concerned that Gray is a below average athlete and the command still isn’t quite there yet, but it’s hard to walk away from this stuff.

55 FV Prospects (Tier of 51)

29. Jake Thompson, RHP, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/60, Slider: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/45+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Thompson slipped to the 2nd round out of high school because his stuff was mostly average, but would tick up at times. That was the book on him earlier this year at High-A Lakeland for Detroit, when he’d start games at 90-92, hitting 93-95 at times and then dip to 88-91 later in the game with a solid average three-pitch mix. In the Florida State League All-Star Game, Thompson sat 93-96 in a one-inning appearance and his slider was at least a 60, though it was a higher effort delivery he didn’t use when starting. Thompson was dealt to the Rangers mid-season in the Joakim Soria trade and scouts that saw him in the Texas League reported he was 92-96 mph with a 60 slider that is sometimes a 70 in short stints. There’s an average change and impact stuff as a starter, but there’s also some effort to the delivery, so the fit may be in the bullpen; he’ll head to Double-A and could be a bullpen option if needed late in the year.

30. Austin Meadows, CF, Pittsburgh Pirates
More: Video
Hit: 20/60, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 20/50+, Run: 60/50+, Field: 50/50+, Throw: 45/45, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Meadows was compared to his friend and fellow 2013 draft Atlanta-area prep hitter Clint Frazier often; scouts were still split over which one they preferred at draft time. After a full season, but Meadows has the clear edge, but it’s still very early. Meadows missed a lot of the season with a hamstring injury, but showed the sweet lefty swing and above average tools that got him drafted 9th overall. Meadows is a big, football-strong type athlete at 6-foot-3/200 and appears to have already lost a step from high school, usually running in the 55 range, with most assuming he’ll settle closer to an average runner. Since his arm is below average, this would shift him to left field and put more pressure on his bat, which is advanced, but he’s still learning to integrate his raw power into his game swing. Jay Bruce is a comparison that’s come up often for Meadows and power-hitting corner outfield may be where this ends up in a few years.

31. David Dahl, CF, Colorado Rockies
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Hit: 20/60, Game Power: 40/55, Raw Power: 55/55, Speed: 60/60, Field: 50/55, Throw: 55/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Dahl’s stock dipped in 2012 and 2013 after going 10th overall out of an Alabama high school due to some maturity issues that caused the Rockies to issue a suspension and limit his exposure to full-season ball until this season. This year, Dahl cruised through Low-A as expected and he may now be on the fast track. Scouts never really doubted Dahl’s ability to hit and one said he almost put a 70 on his bat after seeing him this year; that same scout put a 50 on the future game power despite a line drive approach in games. It may take a few years but advanced, talented hitters with a natural opposite field stroke will often will outhit their raw power at maturity (even with a line drive approach) due to how much hard contact they make. The offensive upside combined with plus speed and a center field profile give Dahl the upside to be a star, but some scouts would like to see more than one year in full-season leagues before they go all-in.

32. Archie Bradley, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks
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Fastball: 65/70, Curveball: 55/65, Cutter: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/45+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Bradley went from premium quarterback/pitching prospect in high school at age 17 to legitimately in play for the #1 overall pick at age 18 to top prospect immediately after signing, to possibly being in the big league rotation at age 21. In retrospect, some scouts think he was pressing in 2014 Spring Training, trying to do too much to impress the big league staff to break camp with the big league club. Bradley went back to Triple-A and by late April, he was on the shelf with an elbow strain. He returned from the DL in Double-A, starting 12 games and heading to the Arizona Fall League, but not quite looking like the same potential frontline starter from previous years. Bradley added a cutter in the AFL that flashed plus, though his changeup and curveball were a notch lower than the grades above and there’s still concerns that he doesn’t have enough feel to stick as a starter, though he should get a big league look in 2015.

33. Henry Owens, LHP, Boston Red Sox
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Fastball: 50/55, Curveball: 45/50+, Changeup: 55/60, Command: 45/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Owens was a projection lefty starter out of high school with advanced feel to pitch and a good changeup; he’s continued to improve and still has plenty of projection to go. Owens sits 90-92 with good deception, extension, command and movement, hitting as high as 95 mph at times. His curveball is solid-average and his plus changeup also draws grades as high as 70 from some scouts. Owens is still a long, lanky type arm that sometimes has trouble corralling his limbs to repeat his delivery and should also throw a tick or two harder down the line. The stuff doesn’t blow you away, but Owens know how to use it and he should get a big league look in 2015.

34. Ozhaino Albies, SS, Atlanta Braves
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Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 30/40, Game Power: 20/35, Run: 65/65, Field: 50/60, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Albies home country Curacao has produced a great recent group of quick-twitch infielders with Andrelton Simmons, Jonathan Schoop and Jurickson Profar, while nearby Aruba has recently produced Xander Bogaerts. Albies is next in line, with some scouts comparing him to a smaller Francisco Lindor or Rafael Furcal with less arm strength. He’s 5-foot-9/150, just turned 18 and has only played one year of short-season ball, but scouts are already tossing 60’s on his hit tool, along with 60 or more on his speed, glove and arm. Feel free to scroll around this list and try to find another example of these kinds of tools; that and universally positive reports are why I’m so bullish on this kid. Power isn’t a big part of game and likely will never be, but he does everything else so well at such a young age, that no one seems to care. He has excellent feel for the strike zone and the bat head, plenty of bat speed, knowledge of when to use his gap power and when to keep the ball on the ground; his full-season debut in 2015 is arguably the most anticipated in baseball.

35. Manuel Margot, CF, Boston Red Sox
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Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 50/50+, Game Power: 20/45, Run: 65/65, Field: 60/65, Throw: 50/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Margot was another recent, premium July 2nd signee for the Red Sox that has gone swimmingly so far, along with Devers below. Margot has game-changing easy plus speed and defense to go with surprising raw power for his size and an advanced bat. Margot has above average bat speed and bat control to go with a simple, line-drive, gap-to-gap approach that takes advantage of his speed with lots of doubles and triples. Margot wore down a bit down the stretch this year and his raw power and arm strength were a tick lower for some scouts, but his performance speaks for itself and he may get a taste of Double-A in 2015 at age 20.

36. Hunter Harvey, RHP, Baltimore Orioles
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Fastball: 60/70, Curveball: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Harvey is the son of former big league reliever Bryan Harvey and wasn’t well known until his draft spring as he opted to play Legion ball instead of hitting the showcase circuit. He went from sitting around 90 with a skinny, lanky frame to hitting the mid-to-upper-90?s in his draft spring, attracting first round attention. Harvey’s 90-93 mph fastball that had hit 96 mph in high school was suddenly sitting 93-97 mph in the summer after he signed, when most prep pitchers are battling sore arms. Expectation adjusted upward and Harvey delivered this year in his full-season debut, with ground balls and strikeouts in bunches. Some elbow soreness sent him to the DL in July and Baltimore shut him down as he’d already reached his innings limit for the season. Scouts are a little wary of a young pitcher with limited innings getting shut down with elbow soreness, so they’d like to see him throw a couple solid starts before totally buying back in, but there’s frontline potential here.

37. Sean Manaea, LHP, Kansas City Royals
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Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 55/60, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Manaea was a largely unknown power lefty with little else to offer as a sophomore at Indiana State, then he blew up that summer on the Cape, sitting 91-95 and hitting 97 mph with life and deception. He was a projected top 5 pick before a terrible spring, caused by bad weather, inconsistent mechanics and bothersome arm soreness to go with a more serious hip injury. The Royals took the late-rising Hunter Dozier with their top pick, signing him to an underslot deal to save money so they could take Manaea, hoping he’d last to their pick at 34 due to his injuries and price tag, which he did. Kansas City signed Manaea for $3.55 million (over a million more than Dozier) and he sat out the rest of the 2013 season, making his pro debut in 2014 at High at age 22. Manaea was back to his old self in carving up the league and is flashing the #2/3 starter upside of his breakout Cape campaign.

38. Maikel Franco, 3B, Philadelphia Phillies
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Hit: 40/50, Raw Power: 60/60, Game Power: 50/60, Run: 30/30, Field: 40/45+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Franco’s breakout was in 2013, between High-A and Double-A, when he went from a high contact hitter with some raw power to a monster hitting over .300 with 30 homers between two levels. Franco is limited physically by his slow feet and will never be more than fringy at third base, but has the plus arm and good hands to figure out a way to make it work over there. The ultimate fit is likely first base, but that’s years away and he’ll get an extended big league look in 2015, with his aggressive offensive approach the big remaining question to answer.

39. Jesse Winker, LF, Cincinnati Reds
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Hit: 30/55, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 30/55, Run: 45/40, Field: 45/45+, Throw: 50/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Winker was a very well-known prospect out of high school, playing on arguably the best travel team in the country and playing on a loaded Orlando-area high school team that included first rounders Walker Weickel and Nick Gordon. Winker has progressed well in pro ball, with some scouts suggesting he may have gotten a tick faster since signing, but the carrying tool here is the bat and it has really shined so far. While the raw power isn’t huge, he should be able to produce 20 bombs at maturity and Winker’s feel to hit is very advanced as his feel for the strike zone. Some scout suggest first base will be his eventual home, but also mention names like Paul O’Neill, John Olerud and Tino Martinez as potential comps.

40. Kevin Plawecki, C, New York Mets
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Hit: 30/55, Raw Power: 50/50, Game Power: 30/45, Run: 35/35, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 50/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Plawecki doesn’t have huge tools and didn’t come from a baseball hotbed, playing high school in Indiana and college at Purdue, but he has lots of feel for the game to make the most of what he does have. This feel was evident as early as college, which got Plawecki taken 35th overall by the Mets, but his defense and contact abilities have held up more in pro ball than rival scouts expected. Plawecki is an offensive catcher, with hit over power due to his contact leaning with a short load, direct path and simple approach. Scouts hang 55 or 60 grades on his bat and he shot through the system in part because he doesn’t strike out and does a good job making adjustments level-to-level. He doesn’t have a big arm, but it’s enough to catch with a good shot for a big league look in 2015, alongside Travis d’Arnaud.

41. Matt Wisler, RHP, San Diego Padres
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Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 55/60, Curveball: 45/45+, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 45/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: To pitch at the Padres pre-draft workout in San Diego in 2011, Wisler flew to the west coast from Ohio and pitched the day after he threw in a high school playoff game, hitting 91 mph at PETCO Park. He’s shown the intangibles from day one, but came to camp in 2013 looking like a completely different pitcher. Wisler now works 91-94, touching 95 mph with sink and commands the pitch to both sides of the plate. His two-plane slider is plus, his changeup is above average at times and he also works in a fringy curveball. Scouts rave about his makeup and strike throwing abilities, though his command isn’t quite big league ready, as he ran into trouble in the hitter-friendly PCL leaving the ball up the zone. Some scouts think his build is too slight and that he won’t be able to hold up for 200 innings, with a couple suggesting he may end up as a late-inning reliever. The consensus is that he should be able to handle 180 innings as a third or fourth starter and he’ll get a big league look in 2015, though the Padres new starting pitching depth may delay that until late in the season.

42. Eddie Butler, RHP, Colorado Rockies
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Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 45/50, Changeup: 55/60, Command: 45/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Butler’s stuff took a step forward since being drafted in the sandwich round in 2012 out of Radford, with his velocity settling a tick or two higher (93-95, touching 97 mph consistently) and his off-speed stuff jumping a notch as well. The big question scouts have about Butler is his durability. He’s had a lot of minor dings and there’s doubt he can hold up for 200 innings, though everything else is there for him to be a starter. If he has to move to the bullpen he could be a closer, with a fastball that’s been up to 99 mph and a knockout changeup, but Colorado will give him every chance to prove he can stay in the rotation. The slider has been a 55 in the past but scouts have said it’s only been average this year.

43. Rio Ruiz, 3B, Atlanta Braves
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Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 20/50+, Run: 40/40, Field: 40/50, Throw: 55/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Ruiz signed with the Astros for an over slot $1.85 million with the money they saved going under slot on SS Carlos Correa as the #1 overall pick in 2012. Ruiz slipped to the 4th round after being in the top 50 pick discussion early in the spring, due to a blood clot in his neck that prematurely ended his season. He was also a standout quarterback in high school, which shows with his above average arm strength, but the 6-foot-2/215 lefty hitter isn’t a traditionally great athlete. He was acquired earlier this month by Atlanta in the Evan Gattis deal. Ruiz is a below average runner with fringy range that limits his defensive upside, though it looks right now like he’ll be able to stay at the hot corner, with the above average raw power to profile. The carrying tool is the bat and Ruiz took a step forward in 2014, but some scouts would like to see him do it outside of the Cal League before throwing a 60 on his hit tool. With a solid year for Atlanta in Double-A in 2015, he’ll be on the fast track for a big league look and is already their third baseman of the future.

44. Jose Peraza, 2B, Atlanta Braves
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Hit: 30/50, Raw Power: 40/40, Game Power: 20/35, Run: 70/70, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 50/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Peraza is a plus-plus runner with game-changing speed and he knows how to use it on the bases, stealing 60 and 64 bases in his last two seasons. He started as a shortstop, was converted to second base full-time in 2014 and handled it well; his average arm isn’t enough for that throw in the hole from shortstop, but he’s good enough for emergency duty at short. Peraza doesn’t have much power, but it isn’t a big part of his game, likely hitting 5-12 homers depending on how he matures as a hitter. He doesn’t see many pitches and aggressively attack the first hittable pitch he sees, using his speed by keeping the ball on the ground and leading to low walk and strikeout rates, but that could cause problems against top big league arms. He’ll start 2015 in Triple-A after short stops in Double-A and High-A last year, and a good chance he’s entrenched in the big league lineup at some point in 2016.

45. Tim Anderson, SS, Chicago White Sox
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Hit: 30/50+, Raw Power: 50/50, Game Power: 20/45+, Run: 65/65, Field: 50/55, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Anderson was almost completely unknown entering his draft year, as he went undrafted in 2012 at the same junior college where he went in the 1st round in 2013. He came out late in spring 2012 after basketball season ended and was often hidden in left field, so it wasn’t easy for scouts to pick up on the raw tools at a rural junior college game with their pref lists mostly set. Anderson is the loose athlete every scout is looking for, with easy plus speed, a plus arm and, despite some issues he’s working on with fundamentals and footwork, he has the tools to stick at shortstop. He has plus bat speed, above average bat control and surprising pop, flashing average raw power. Anderson’s feel to hit can sometimes get in his way: he isn’t as patient at the plate as he should be, with his ability to square up most pitches he’s facing now holding back his long-term interests. That said, he’s still hasn’t played much high level baseball, he’s already in Double-A at age 21 and the talent is ridiculous.

46. Nomar Mazara, RF, Texas Rangers
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Hit: 20/50+, Game Power: 50/65, Raw Power: 65/65, Speed: 40/40, Field: 45/45+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Mazara’s all-time record-smashing $4.95 million bonus in the last year before international bonus pools opened some eyes, both for the amount and the player. Some pointed to a hitchy swing with timing issues and that was still a concern after last year’s just okay full-season debut at age 18, where Mazara hit .236 with 131 Ks in Low-A. This year, the 19-year-old Mazara made the necessary adjustments, getting his foot down faster which unlocked his bat speed and strength while giving him more time to make a decision on the pitch. He jumped all the way to Double-A, where he’ll start this year and it now on the fast track with a classic power/power right field profile.

47. Braden Shipley, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks
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Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 55/65, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Shipley started pitching as a sophomore at Nevada, then went in the middle of the 1st round after his junior year, highlighting how quickly he went from advanced athlete without a position to premium pitching prospect. He’s a ridiculous athlete that scouts tend to believe can do anything in part because of how quickly he’s taken to pitching. Shipley flashed three plus pitches after signing, especially notable because his curveball was rarely used in college and was the reason he lasted all the way to the 15th pick. At his best, Shipley sits 92-95 and touches 98 mph, though his fastball has average at best movement and tends to straighten out late in starts when he’s fatigued. His curveball flashes plus and his changeup is a 65 pitch for some scouts. Shipley’s command still comes and goes, but he’s such a good athlete that scouts assume that will come around to average. He’s still working to get his arm conditioned to last late into games and Shipley’s stuff would, at times, play down a notch or two this season from the peak stuff noted in the future pitch grades above. He’ll spend 2015 in the upper minors and should get a real big league chance in 2016.

48. Rafael Devers, 3B, Boston Red Sox
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Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 55/60, Game Power: 20/55, Run: 40/40, Field: 40/50, Throw: 55/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Devers has an unusual frame for a top July 2nd prospect, as that market is all about potential and, typically, the most projectable, long, lean frames. Devers stood out from a young age due to his advanced approach, precocious raw power and loose, handsy, all-fields left-handed swing. He’s dropped some bad weight since his amateur days and is still adding some strength and maturing. I often talk about how scouts and analysts agree that opposite field game power at a young age is one of the best indicators of a prospect that has a good chance to become an elite big league bat; Devers has all the makings.

49. Hunter Renfroe, RF, San Diego Padres
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Hit: 30/50+, Raw Power: 65/65, Game Power: 30/60, Run: 55/55, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Renfroe had a Paul Bunyan type backstory but came from relative obscurity with limited playing time as an underclassman at Mississippi State; he was a catcher, with pop times in the 1.7s, or easily plus plus, but little feel to catch and he was also an arm strength reliever that sat 93-96 and hit 98 mph, but with little command. He broke out in the summer after his sophomore year in the largely unscouted Cal Ripken League, then demolished the SEC as a junior en route to going in the middle of the first round. He has easy plus raw power and one Padres official compared his quick-twitch, late-blooming plus bat speed/plus power profile to Nelson Cruz. One big difference is that Renfroe will turn in plus run times to first base on close plays, to go with his plus arm in right field; he occasionally plays center field in the minors and can fill in there if needed in the majors. Some scouts think he’s too aggressive at the plate and see shades of Jeff Francoeur, but I think there’s a solid everyday player here with a chance for a star.

50. Andrew Heaney, LHP, Los Angeles Angels
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Fastball: 55/55, Slider: 55/55, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 45/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Heaney was heralded in his draft year out of Oklahoma State as an advanced pitchability lefty with above average stuff that could turn into a #3/4 starter in short order and that’s almost exactly what’s happened. He already got a big league look in 2014 with Miami before being traded to the Dodgers in the Dee Gordon trade, then flipped to the Angels for Howie Kendrick. His fastball and slider will both flash 60 in his best outings, but Heaney relies more on his feel to pitch than his raw stuff to get strikeouts and grounders. He should be up at some point in 2015 depending on the big league need.

51. Aaron Nola, RHP, Philadelphia Phillies
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Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 50/60, Command: 45/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Nola was a smaller righty that threw 85-88 mph from a low slot with some feel in high school, then he exploded onto the scene at LSU, throwing 91-94 mph as a sophomore and hitting 96 mph pretty often in his draft year. Nola creates above average life on his fastball and changeup with the spin he puts on the ball from the low slot. One of the concerns is that his low 3/4 slinging slot allows left-handed hitters seeing the ball too clearly, but Nola’s plus changeup does the heavy lifting here; his above average command and aggressive approach also help keep hitters off balance. He’s never been hurt before despite an unusual delivery and while his stuff was a tick worse after signing, that’s expected with pitchers throwing the longest year of their young careers. Nola will head to Double-A for 2015 and should get a big league look at some point if he has a strong season.

52. Steven Souza, RF, Tampa Bay Rays
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Hit: 45/50+, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 45/50+, Run: 50/50+, Field: 50/50+, Throw: 55/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: It would seem easy to like a guy with everyday tools that also really performs. Some scouts are all-in on Souza, but most are at least a little dubious that he’ll be able to keep it up in the majors, due to his approach, size and career path. After a slow start to his career as a 3rd round pick in 2007 out of high school (which included a drug suspension in 2010), Souza started crushing everything he faced in 2012 at age-23 in High-A. He followed that with huge years in 2013 at age-24 in Double-A and in 2014 at age-25 in Triple-A. All three of those seasons are two years old for the target age for a prospect to be at each level, so some scouts don’t even totally buy into the performance. Souza is a late bloomer, but he was also the key to the Wil Myers trade for Tampa Bay and he’ll likely be an Opening Day Starter that may post a couple WAR in 2015 and also may outperform Myers right after the deal. These things are all on the table now, but seemed completely absurd to consider a year or two ago, giving you a sense of how much Souza’s stock has risen in that time.

53. Jorge Alfaro, C, Texas Rangers
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Hit: 20/45, Game Power: 45/55, Raw Power: 65/65, Speed: 45/45+, Field: 40/50+, Throw: 70/70, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Alfaro’s easy plus raw power may never fully play at the big league level, but since he can stick behind the plate, it won’t have to. Alfaro has the tools to be an above average defender and his plus-plus arm is a huge weapon, but he still needs some work on the finer points of catching, as his arm strength allows him to get away with stuff in the minors that he won’t be able to do in the majors. Like catchers below like O’Conner, Betancourt and Hedges, Alfaro has some trouble with his approach and reaching his offensive upside, but his raw tools are the best of that bunch and he’ll head to Double-A to start 2015 as Texas’ catcher of the future.

54. Sean Newcomb, LHP, Los Angeles Angels
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Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Newcomb was the Hunter Dozier of the 2014 draft, a player that clubs liked higher than the media consensus had them, partly because teams weren’t sure if they were the only team that had him so high, so they kept it secret. Sources have indicated that the Mariners probably would’ve taken Newcomb at the 6th pick if Alex Jackson wasn’t there and there were a couple more spots where he was the backup choice before the Angels stopped the slide at 15th overall. The things scouts like so much about Newcomb are easy to see: he’s huge (6-foot-5/240), athletic, left-handed, has a fresh arm (New England multi-sport kid), flashed three plus pitches (sits 91-94, hits 97 mph) and shows surprising pitchability considering his background. His off-speed stuff plays more to a 55 on a consistent basis, but the raw elements are here for an ace if Newcomb can make all the necessary adjustments and stay healthy.

55. D.J. Peterson, 1B, Seattle Mariners
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Hit: 40/50+, Raw Power: 65/65, Game Power: 40/60, Run: 45/40, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 55/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Peterson emerged in his draft year at New Meciso as a guy that scouts saw both advanced hit-ability and raw power, with some comparing him to Billy Butler and Jeff Bagwell for an unexpectedly loose swing in a stout frame. Peterson plays third base now and has the hands and arms to hang around there for awhile, but every scout I’ve talked to sees him moving over to first base at some point in the next few years. He’ll be 23 next year and should perform in Double-A and/or Triple-A, setting the stage for a late-season 2015 big league look with a chance to stick in 2016 as a middle of the order masher.

56. Brandon Finnegan, LHP, Kansas City Royals
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Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 55/60, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 45/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Finnegan was one of the tougher evaluations in this past June’s draft class. The TCU ace appeared to be an anomaly: He had a high effort delivery from a small frame (5-foot-11/185) but he also had advanced command and no injury history. Finnegan was up to 98 mph last summer and regularly up to 96 mph this spring, drawing Scott Kazmir and Billy Wagner comparisons from scouts. Then, he missed multiple starts down the stretch with a stiff shoulder that threw the whole evaluation into question. Finnegan looked fine in abbreviated looks before the draft and went 17th overall to the Royals, whereas he had top 10 rumors around him before the shoulder tightness. It’s still not clear if he’s a mid-rotation starter or closer long-term, but we saw in September that his stuff will play wherever you put it.

57. Reynaldo Lopez, RHP, Washington Nationals
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Fastball: 65/75, Curveball: 50/55, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Lopez signed with no fanfare, getting a $17,000 bonus at age 18 near the end of the 2012 signing period. He sat in the upper 80?s at the time, then his velo steadily climbed a tick each month until he hit the mid-90?s in 2013. He only pitched a handful of innings in 2013 due to a sore arm, which is somewhat expected for a teenager whose climbing velocity is putting new stresses on his arm. Lopez got back on the mound in 2014 and took off, sitting 93-97 and hitting 100 mph on many occasions. He adds and subtracts from his fastball, showing surprising feel for a young power arm and his changeup and command both flash average to slightly above potential because of his advanced body control and feel for his delivery. This new velo was the result of the player development staff helping Lopez tweak his delivery before 2014, making him more direct to the plate and more downhill to leverage the ball better and cut out the east/west movement in his delivery. With the newness of his big stuff, we still don’t know what Lopez’s upside is, so his 2015 will be watched closely by teams hoping the Nats make him available in trade talks.

58. Aaron Judge, RF, New York Yankees
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Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 70/70, Game Power: 20/60, Run: 50/45, Field: 50/50, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Judge generated a lot of buzz after a summer on the Cape when the 6-foot-7/250 athletic monster showed huge power, but inconsistent game performances. That continued in the spring at Fresno State, when he only tapped into his plus plus raw power at times, often option to shorten up and hit singles or struggling versus advanced pitchers, which is why he slid to the end of the first round. Multiple clubs I talked to didn’t have him anywhere close to the first round and some area scouts turned him in as a middle round pick. He blew away those expectations in his pro debut this year, hitting 21 homers and making plenty of contact. He’ll be 23 in Double-A next year and that will give us a better idea of if he’s a solid everyday guy or a potential star, but there’s clearly more here than people were expecting.

59. Aaron Blair, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks
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Fastball: 50/55, Curveball: 45/50+, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 45/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Blair has slowly improved since being drafted last June that some in the organization have him as the #1 prospect in the system. He isn’t as flashy as Bradley and Shipley, but Blair has three pitches that all have been plus at times for scouts and are all regularly above average. One scout compared Blair’s ability to get heavy life on pitches to Roy Halladay, in part due to how big Blair’s hands are, while another scout compared him to John Lackey or Lance Lynn, a big and unspectacular but steady #3/4 starter that outperforms more heralded talents. Blair sits 90-94 and has been up to 96 mph with improved arm speed this season. He throws a lot of strikes and the heavy life on his fastball helps induce weak contact rather than a ton of strikeouts. Blair’s curveball was the concern as an amateur and early in his pro career, but now consistently shows average with some grading it as high as plus at times, while hi changeup has been above average all along. He’ll likely get a big league look at some point in 2015.

60. Amed Rosario, SS, New York Mets
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Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 45/55, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 55/50, Field: 50/55, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Rosario got the biggest international bonus in club history two years ago and has done nothing but impress since then. Scouts have called him special and the most athletic player in the Mets system. He has the live body, quick hands, instincts and ability to adjust to challenges along with the broad shoulders to project more strength to come. Rosario skipped the DSL and adjusted as older competition came at him; this is the high ceiling guy with feel for the game that you can dream on. Rosario has feel to stay inside the ball and works the middle of the field in games, with a surprising amount of homers to right-center field already. Scouts have mentioned Addison Russell, Hanley Ramirez and Adrian Beltre as possible comps and each has some things in common with Rosario, but his full-season debut will tell us more about the kind of player he’s becoming.

61. Raul Mondesi, SS, Kansas City Royals
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Hit: 20/45, Raw Power: 45/45+, Game Power: 20/45, Run: 60/60, Field: 55/60, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: As you may guess, Raul (who went by his middle name Adalberto when he signed) is the son of former Dodger RF Raul Mondesi, who is now the mayor of his hometown in the Dominican Republic. The Royals took some flack for giving him $2 million in the 2011 July 2nd period, but he improved greatly after signing and has made that investment look shrewd. There aren’t questions about Mondesi’s speed, defense, arm strength or raw power, but the aggressive way the Royals have promoted him have raised questions about his bat. He played all of last season in High-A at age 18/19, the same age as an American high school senior, so you can imagine why he struggled with the bat. It’s hard to see impact, even from a good swing with bat speed, when the hitter is overmatched, so it’s difficult to get really excited about Mondesi until he isn’t being thrown in the deep end of the pool developmentally, but it’s hard to ignore his ability.

62. Raisel Iglesias, RHP, Cincinnati Reds
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 50/55, Curveball: 45/50, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 45/45+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Iglesias was exclusively a reliever in Cuba and would get into the mid-90?s at times with an above average slider, with most teams thinking that was a preview of his eventual big league fit. The Reds see these types of talents as an opportunity to develop those talents in a rotation (Nick Howard and Michael Lorenzen below are recent domestic examples) and with the successful Aroldis Chapman contract behind, took another gamble of a talented Cuban reliever. Iglesias jumped from the fringes off this list into the middle of it with electric appearances in the Arizona Fall League and instructs. He sat 91-95 and hit 97 mph in these outings, with his stuff varying a bit in each outing. Iglesias is about to turn 25 and there’s some east/west, inconsistency and effort to his delivery, but scouts see the elements of average command in the tank. Iglesias has a four pitch mix and his slider will flash plus every now and then, so there’s mid-rotation upside. He’ll either go to Triple-A and join a deep staff or break with the big league club in the bullpen; it sounds right now like the big league bullpen is his likely starting point but, like with Chapman, the rotation will be tried once the innings get built up.

63. Ryan McMahon, 3B, Colorado Rockies
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/55, Game Power: 40/55, Raw Power: 55/60, Speed: 45/45, Field: 40/50, Throw: 55/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Some teams were skeptical before the draft of McMahon’s ability to corral his long limbs to make enough contact long-term, but some scouts I talked to were all-in after an impressive full-season debut. One scout argued McMahon could be the Rockies #1 prospect right now and with Gray/Butler possibly graduating next year and McMahon heading to the hitter-friendly Cal League in 2015, that may happen next year. He strikes out more than you’d like to see, but McMahon is just 19 and was also a star quarterback in high school (another example of a Rockies draft pick with that on his resume), so there’s still a need for reps. McMahon projects for plus raw power and, while he isn’t there right now, most believe with some work he will be able to stick at third base long-term.

64. C.J. Edwards, RHP, Chicago Cubs
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 45/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Edwards was a near unknown pitcher as an amateur; you don’t see many pitchers this high on prospect lists that signed for $50,000 out of high school in the 48th round. The Cubs smartly grabbed him from Texas in the Matt Garza trade late in his breakout season in 2013. He’s still a rail-thin righty that some think will never add the necessary bulk to throw 200 innings in the big leagues, but the stuff and command projects for the middle of the rotation. He’ll head back to Double-A to begin 2015 but could be a big league rotation option in 2016.

65. Steven Matz, LHP, New York Mets
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 40/50, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Matz was a high school draft out of New York state that was a raw talent to begin with, but he then lost about two years of development time at the beginning of his career, due to a Tommy John surgery and some complications. He did well in Low-A last year, then took a big step forward this year over High-A and Double-A, putting him in conversation of the Mets deep upper levels of pitching. Matz works 91-95 and hits 96 mph with an above average to plus changeup and a curveball that’s improved dramatically to now flash average to slightly above. He’s an excellent athlete that commands his fastball well and his maturity and ability to improve has impressed the Mets. There’s a #3 starter in here if it all comes together, but the curveball and command of his off-speed is still inconsistent, not to mention his age and injury history give scouts some pause.

66. Jameson Taillon, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates
More: Video
Fastball: 60/70, Curveball: 55/65, Changeup: 40/50, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Taillon was one of the more hyped high school pitchers in recent memory, with both the Pirates and Orioles ranking him first on their draft boards, ahead of Bryce Harper and Manny Machado. He flashed the same power stuff in pro ball as he did in high school, with an explosive mid-90’s fastball and a curveball that was a 70 at times, though his changeup and command lagged behind. There wasn’t really a question if Taillon could stick as a starter, he just had trouble with some finer points of pitching and consistency. Then, his elbow popped and he got Tommy John surgery last year, knocking out his entire 2014 season. He’ll return in the middle of the season in the upper levels and should be a big league option in 2016, assuming everything comes back as expected.

67. Jeff Hoffman, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays
More: Video
Fastball: 60/70, Curveball: 55/65, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Hoffman was a known power arm for the 2014 draft at East Carolina, then he broke out in the summer before the draft on the Cape (see linked video), flashing an 80 fastball and 65 or 70 curveball from an athletic delivery, projectable frame and shockingly good feel to pitch given the power stuff. He didn’t look the same in the spring, as just as he was making adjustments to his delivery to regain form, his elbow popped and he won’t return until until mid-season in 2015. Even with the surgery taking Hoffman out of #1 overall pick contention, the Jays thought he wouldn’t get out of the top 5, so they were pleased to land him with the 9th overall pick. He drew comparisons to Adam Wainwright and Justin Verlander on the Cape, so if he regains that form, he could shoot to the top of this list in short order.

68. Max Fried, LHP, Atlanta Braves
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 50/60, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 45/55, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: The 6-foot-4/185 lefty was half of what may have been the best 1-2 punch in high school baseball history, with Nationals top prospect RHP Lucas Giolito at Harvard Westlake High School in 2012. Unfortunately, Giolito’s senior season ended prematurely with soreness that led to Tommy John surgery and Fried himself also had the surgery performed on him this past August; the Braves acquired him from San Diego this winter as the headliner in the Justin Upton deal. He’s due back on the mound sometime around fall instructional league in 2015. Even in those few starts before his elbow popped in 2014, Fried’s stuff was still pretty close to his peak stuff: 90-93, hitting 96 mph with a plus curveball and improving above average changeup. His stuff will vary start to start and his changeup flashes 60 for some scouts, but not often and never when at the same time as his curveball. Fried’s clean mechanics aren’t a concern and he has lots of projection to his frame, so these future grades could be conservative; the upside is huge, with one scout mentioning Cole Hamels, but it’s still very early.

69. Mike Foltynewicz, RHP, Atlanta Braves
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 70/80, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 45/45+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Foltynewicz got an 18.2 inning taste of the big leagues late in 2014 and started 18 of his 21 minor league appearances, but is far from a finished product. He sits 95-98 mph and has hit 100 mph as a starter with a curveball that flashes plus at times, but his lack of command of the pitch causes the pitch to play closer to average at times. His changeup has flashed plus for some scouts, but plays average to slightly above for most. There’s a lack of feel here that causes many to doubt Foltynewicz’s future as a starter. He’s a solid athlete and his delivery isn’t that bad but he hasn’t quite put it all together ye. The Braves top scouts have seen the best version of Foltynewicz and they’re confident that big league pitching coach Roger McDowell can coax the starter traits out of Folty on a regular basis, likely in the big leagues in 2015.

70. Aaron Sanchez, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays
More: Video
Fastball: 65/70, Curveball: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 45/45+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Sanchez has a sturdy 6-foot-4/200 frame and loose arm that helped him go in the sandwich round in 2010 out of a southern California high school. He was a raw pitcher with flashes of power stuff, but Sanchez has really grown into his velocity since then, sitting 95-98 and hitting 99 mph in 33 big league relief innings at the end of 2014. As his off-speed stuff has improved to give Sanchez at least mid-rotation stuff, the question remains if he fits better there or as a closer. Toronto’s #5 starter spot is still an open competition along with at least one bullpen slot, so Sanchez has the opportunity this year to prove where he fits.

71. Alex Meyer, RHP, Minnesota Twins
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 70/80, Slider: 60/65, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/45, FV: 55
Scouting Report: The 6-foot-9/220 monster sat 98-100 mph for two innings in the linked video in last year’s Arizona Fall League debut. He surprised some scouts by lasting the whole season in the rotation at Triple-A this year, throwing 130.1 innings with lesser but still elite stuff, sitting 93-98 with plus life and the knockout slider. Meyer’s changeup has improved and flashes solid-average while his huge frame and long limbs give him trouble commanding his pitches and repeating his delivery. Most scouts think he ends up as a shutdown closer, but the Twins are trying to make him a starter and there’s still a chance Meyer gets there. If he can tone everything down to where it’s repeatable, the upside is probably a #3 starter but this seems destined for the bullpen at some point, with a 2015 big league look likely once an spot opens up.

72. Nick Gordon, SS, Minnesota Twins
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 45/50, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 50/50+, Field: 50/55, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Nick is the son of Tom Gordon and the brother of Marlins 2B Dee Gordon, so the bloodlines are good and when Nick was a high school sophomore, his senior teammates were first rounders RF Jesse Winker and RHP Walker Weickel. Combine that with the fact that Nick was noticeable as a top prospect in his class as early as his freshman year and he seemed to be at every major showcase or tournament his entire prep career and it’s easy to see why scout were comfortable with him by draft time. Between October and January showcases, Gordon appeared to put on about 10 pounds and mature physically, turning him from a late first rounder into the 5th overall pick. He doesn’t have flashy tools other than his plus arm that allowed him to hit 95 mph on the mound, so there isn’t much margin for error, but Gordon has excellent feel for the game, helped by working with Barry Larkin during earlier this year.

73. Kohl Stewart, RHP, Minnesota Twins
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 50/60, Curveball: 50/60, Slider: 45/50+, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Stewart was the 4th overall pick in 2013 as an athletic righty that flashed plus stuff at times and was also a four star quarterback recruit committed to Texas A&M. He’s had some ups and down in pro ball with his stuff varying from game-to-game, but he’s still relatively new to the mound and arm speed variations are normal for young arms with limited experience.

74. Tyler Kolek, RHP, Miami Marlins
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/70, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 40/50, Command: 40/50, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Kolek jumped on the national scene in the summer of 2013 after hitting 100 mph at the Area Code Games regional tryout in Texas, just after the 2013 MLB Draft. He then showed up at most of the major events over the summer, where his velocity ranged from 93-98, hitting 100 mph in early innings, but sometimes would dip to the low 90?s in longer outings. His sharp low-80?s curveball would flash plus but was often just average to above, while he only very sparingly threw a nascent changeup. As prep pitchers often do, Kolek’s velo slipped after the draft and he looked quite ordinary, but this is a long-term play by the Marlins. If Kolek can maintain his peak stuff, he’s got a chance to be a frontline starter, which is rare, but there’s a long way to go and there’s plenty of risk along the way.

75. Vince Velasquez, RHP, Houston Astros
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 45/50+, Changeup: 55/60, Command: 45/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Velasquez has been a standout talent when healthy, but he has a long history of injuries. He had a strained ligament and stress fracture in his throwing elbow in his junior year of high school, then after going in the 2nd round and throwing 29.1 pro innings in 2010, Velasquez missed all of 2011 with Tommy John surgery. He also didn’t look his best in the Arizona Fall League after a solid season, with multiple teams telling me they were spooked enough by the medical to avoid him in trade talks. When he’s right, Velasquez sits 91-95 with a plus changeup and an improving curveball that flashes average to slightly above, to go with some feel to pitch that draw solid-average command grades. He’s also an excellent athlete that looks on the mound like he could grab a stick and play in the field if he wanted to. Some scouts that saw him at his peak prefer him to Appel, but the spotty history makes that a hard stance to support without more healthy innings from Velasquez.

76. Alex Reyes, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
More: Video
Fastball: 60/65, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/45+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Reyes grew up in New Jersey then moved to the Dominican, where he signed with the Cardinals for $850,000. He checks all the boxes as a young power arm, with a projectable 6-foot-3/185 frame, a solid delivery, and easy plus fastball that sits 92-95 and hits 97 mph along withe a curveball that flashes plus. He’s still learning the finer points of his craft, with his command and consistency of his off-speed stuff varying start-to-start. He’ll be 20 in High-A next year and could be on the fast track to the big leagues with some key adjustments.

77. Michael Conforto, LF, New York Mets
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50+, Raw Power: 60/60, Game Power: 20/60, Run: 35/35, Field: 45/50, Throw: 50/50+, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Conforto was a well-known as an elite hitting prospect early in his career at Oregon State but kicked it into another gear in his draft year. His plus raw power and bat speed from the left side to go with a patient and power-focused approach appealed to a lot of scouts, with the Mets taking Conforto off the board at 10th overall. He earned a shaky defensive reputation in college and when I saw him in the summer after his sophomore year for Team USA, his arm was a 40 or 45 and he was still having some difficulty getting good jumps. He took a step forward in his draft spring, looking about average defensively with his arm suddenly playing average to slightly above. The idea that he was a first baseman was gone and the coaches in Brooklyn raved about Conforto’s defense after he signed. The bat is the carrying tool for Conforto and he’s the same age as Nimmo, so it’ll be interesting to compare their development over the next few years as advanced corner bats.

78. Chance Sisco, C, Baltimore Orioles
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 45/50, Game Power: 20/45, Run: 40/35, Field: 40/50, Throw: 55/55, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Sisco was an under-the-radar draft prospect that didn’t go to the big showcases and only started catching in his senior year, because he pitched and played multiple positions. He’s still rough at times behind the plate, but it’s more due to a lack of experience with the little things than a lack of ability. The tools are there to stick behind the plate and be average defensively, with enough arm for the position, though Sisco needs to work on quickening his release. The carrying tool here is the bat and scouts grade it anywhere from 55 to 70, despite Sisco’s highest pro experience coming at Low-A. One scout said Sisco’s approach and offensive tools are similar to former Orioles RF Nick Markakis.

79. Franklin Barreto, SS, Oakland A’s
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 45/45, Game Power: 20/45, Run: 65/65, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 55
Scouting Report: Barreto was known to international scouts for years before he signed for $1.45 million on July 2nd, 2012 from Venezuela. There’s something to be said for smaller kids reaching their potential sooner than the more projectable, higher upside prospects, but don’t mistake Barreto for a low upside prospect just due to his size. He’s a plus runner that very well could end up sticking at shortstop, where he plays now and has made improvements, though most scouts see his actions and size and assume he slides over to second base or out to center field. At the least, he’ll offer the ability to play all three positions in the big leagues if needed. He’s so advanced at the plate that he may play both A-Ball levels in 2015 and zoom through the system, which is why the A’s made him a key part of the Josh Donaldson trade.

50 FV Prospects (Tier of 63)

80. Dalton Pompey, CF, Toronto Blue Jays
More: Full Report & Video
Hit: 40/50+, Raw Power: 45/45, Game Power: 35/40, Run: 60/60, Field: 50/55, Throw: 45/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Pompey was a little-known, young-for-his-class Canadian high schooler in the 2011 draft and stayed under the radar until a strong finish to his 2013 campaign in Low-A. He shot through the system in 2014, going form High-A to the big leagues after he kept impressing at each level when the Blue Jays though he may settle in. Pompey will start in Triple-A or the big leagues in 2015 and is the center fielder of the future, but the tools are more solid everyday than star material.

81. Stephen Piscotty, RF, St. Louis Cardinals
More: Video
Hit: 45/55, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 35/50, Run: 45/45+, Field: 50/50, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Piscotty has been a steady if unspectacular prospect for years, showing above average tools and performance. He had and excuse for his raw power not showing up enough in games because he went to Stanford where they literally yell at hitters to not hit homers in batting practice. Piscotty hit nine homer sin a full Triple-A season last year, so with little progress and in today’s muted offensive environment, that’s one of the top 60 corner outfielders in the game, but the raw power is there for 20 homers, which would make him a middle of the order type bat.

82. Marco Gonzales, LHP, St. Louis Cardinals
More: Video
Fastball: 50/50, Slider: 45/50, Curveball: 50/50, Changeup: 55/60, Command: 45/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: In the 2013 draft, Gonzales was seen as a quick-moving college lefty with above average command and a plus changeup, but probably just #4 starter upside. He shot through the minors and had his first speed bump in his big league audition, but some minor adjustments should unlock a steady, league-average starter in short order.

83. Trea Turner, SS, Washington Nationals
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 40/40, Game Power: 20/40, Run: 70/70, Field: 50/55, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Turner was barely known by scouts in high school, then was seen as a possible first rounder after a huge freshman year at N.C. State. He has a chance to go in the top five picks with his teammate LHP Carlos Rodon (#8 on this list) entering his junior season, but trouble with swing mechanics led to an up-and-down draft year. Rodon went 3rd overall and Turner went 13th overall, with Turner being dealt this summer in a three-way deal with Tampa Bay and San Diego, but he can’t be formally sent to the Nationals until one year after he signed, which will be this June. I’m a high guy on Turner in the industry and I may adjust his hit grade up a notch with a strong start to 2015.

84. Brandon Drury, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/50+, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 45/50, Run: 35/35, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Drury was traded from Atlanta to Arizona as a secondary piece in the first Justin Upton deal. He’s steadily made progress since a slow start to pro ball and now is knocking on the door of the big leagues with solid tools across the board. The D’Backs toyed with trying Drury at second base in the Arizona Fall League since he had such good range at third, but his bat is what will carry him; I may be a grade light on it.

85. Brandon Nimmo, RF, New York Mets
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 45/50+, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 50/50+, Field: 50/50+, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Nimmo has an unusual background as a 1st rounder from a Wyoming high school, where they don’t even have organized high school baseball. He played for a travel team leading up to the draft and teams liked his smooth lefty stroke, power potential and plus athleticism. Nimmo probably ends up in right field and is still working through his fit on the offensive contact/power and aggressive/passive spectrum, but the tools are here for an above average everyday right fielder and he’s performed well while being young for his level.

86. Andrew Susac, C, San Francisco Giants
More: Video
Hit: 40/45+, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 40/50, Run: 35/35, Field: 50/50, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Susac is pretty well explained by his tool grades and he’s near big league ready. He’s can catch and throw at least league average and his ultimate upside comes down to how much contact he makes and how much of his 20-homer power he gets to in games.

87. Orlando Arcia, SS, Milwaukee Brewers
More: Video
Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 45/45+, Game Power: 20/45, Run: 55/55, Field: 55/60, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Orlando is the younger brother of Twins OF Oswaldo Arcia and has been beating expectations since he signed out of Venezuela in 2010 for $95,000. After signing, he immediately looked like a steal as a skinny kid that could play shortstop and hit a bit, but he took another step forward this year, hitting 13% better than league average, stealing 31 bases and posting great plate discipline numbers in a full season at High-A last year at age 19. He’ll head to Double-A next year at age 20 and has the look of a solid everyday shortstop.

88. Michael Lorenzen, RHP, Cincinnati Reds
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 50/60, Curveball: 40/50, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Lorenzen, like Howard below (#128 on the list) was drafted as a two-way college closer with limited experience on the mound, particularly in long outings. Lorenzen surprised the Reds with his feel for pitching and his ability to hold his sinker-slider combo that flashes plus late into outings. There’s mid-rotation upside here, but Lorenzen still needs to work on some of the finer points of setting up hitters.

89. Grant Holmes, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers
More: Video
Fastball: 55/65, Curveball: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Holmes may have been my favorite prep pitcher in last year’s draft. He’s only 6-foot tall and has no physical projection remaining, but he’s strong, has feel to pitch and has knockout #2 starter stuff. Holmes hit 100 mph early in the spring but more commonly sits 92-94, hitting 96 mph with an easy plus curveball and changeup that flashes above average.

90. Willy Adames, SS, Tampa Bay Rays
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50+, Raw Power: 45/50, Game Power: 20/45+, Run: 50/50, Field: 50/55, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Adames is one of the most recent examples of the Tigers developing a solid prospect and dealing him as soon as he had significant trade value, like RHP Jake Thompson (#29 on this list) who was used to get RHP Joakim Soria. Adames had a breakout year at Low-A in 2014 and was the significant second piece used to get LHP David Price. The Rays were pleasantly surprised how quickly the 19-year-old Adames became a leader for their Low-A club after the trade, but the reason they traded for him was his advanced feel for the game and easy everyday tools.

91. Raimel Tapia, CF, Colorado Rockies
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/60, Game Power: 30/40, Raw Power: 35/45, Speed: 60/60, Field: 45/55, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Tapia is rail-thin and his swing is kinda funny-looking, but he hits so much (.342/.392/.503 in over 700 PA in domestic leagues) that scouts are starting to mention those things less often. He’ll head to the hitter-friendly Cal League next year and will rake again, but his upside is limited a bit by his size and power. One scout said a bad outcome for Tapia would be turning into Jon Jay, with a good chance he’s better than that.

92. Albert Almora, CF, Chicago Cubs
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50+, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 55/55, Field: 60/65, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Almora was my favorite player in the 2012 draft class due to his advanced instincts and feel for the game on both sides of the ball. He’s still that guy, but had a hamate injury and has had some struggles at the plate because he’s such an aggressive hitter. He’ll need to make some adjustments to his approach since Double-A was the first level where he couldn’t hit with that approach. If he makes some progress there, he has 15+ homer power and near Gold Glove defense, so there’s some real ceiling despite just solid raw tools.

93. Max Pentecost, C, Toronto Blue Jays
More: Video
Hit: 20/50+, Raw Power: 20/45+, Game Power: 45/50+, Run: 55/50+, Field: 45/55, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Pentecost was the breakout prospect in last summer’s Cape Cod League as a super-athletic catcher from a small school (Kennesaw State), that was a so-so physical away from signing with Texas out of high school. I was the high guy on him much of the spring, with the industry catching up when Theo Epstein was spotted at a Pentecost game and rumors spread that he may go #4 overall. Pentecost ended up going #11 overall and has unusual tools for a catcher with a ridiculous amount of energy (watch the end of the linked video) and every tool solid average or better, though his line drive approach in games causes his raw power to play down right now.

94. Kyle Zimmer, RHP, Kansas City Royals
More: Video
Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 50/50+, Curveball: 55/65, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 45/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Zimmer’s pure ability belongs much higher on this list, with frontline stuff, a clean delivery and outstanding athleticism that helps creates solid average command. Zimmer has also been to Double-A already and could turn into a frontline starter, but he can’t stay healthy, throwing 14.1 innings last year due to arm trouble, then leaving the Arizona Fall League after three outings to get shoulder surgery. Scouts assume he won’t be able to handle a starter’s workload and he should just be used in relief, but now we don’t know if the stuff will come back after surgery, so there’s lots of questions, risk and upside here.

95. Erick Fedde, RHP, Washington Nationals
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Slider: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Fedde broke out last summer for Team USA and on the Cape, then steadily climbed up draft boards to the point that he was a consensus top 10 pick when he was forced to get Tommy John surgery before the draft. The Nats drafted him in the back half of the first round knowing they normally don’t have a chance to pick this kind of talent and all indications are solid from his rehab. There’s mid-rotation upside with a slight chance for more, and elbow surgery has something like an 85% success rate, so if he comes back later this year with the same stuff, Fedde will move up this list a healthy amount.

96. Justin O’Conner, C, Tampa Bay Rays
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/45, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 40/40, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 80/80, FV: 50
Scouting Report: O’Conner was a raw first round pick in 2011 out of an Indiana high school, with multiple teams having him in the middle rounds because they didn’t think he’d hit enough. That looked to be the case until this year, when things clicked across the board for O’Conner and he stood out offensively in High-A and the Arizona Fall League and getting back on track on an age-versus-level basis by hitting Double-A late in the year. O’Conner is still a power over hit guy that will strike out a fair amount, but the offensive standard for catchers is low and he’ll be at least average behind the plate and likely be better due to his top-of-the-scale 80 arm with a freaky quick release that allows him to put up ridiculous pop times in the 1.7s.

97. Daniel Robertson, SS, Tampa Bay Rays
More: Video
Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 50/50+, Game Power: 20/45+, Run: 45/45, Field: 50/50+, Throw: 50/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Robertson was acquired by the Rays from the A’s this winter in the Ben Zobrist trade and he’s a steady player with solid tools that still gets somewhat wide-ranging reviews from scouts. From my limited look at his this fall, he can’t play shortstop and at least one-third of scouts agreed with what I saw, which I also realize could’ve just been a bad look. The A’s, Rays and execs from other clubs are convinced after seeing him a lot over the past few years that he can play shortstop, which would help his solid average bat fit even better in the lineup. I think Robertson fits as an offensive second baseman who may hit 15-18 homers, so even Robertson’s detractors see a solid everyday player.

98. Marcos Molina, RHP, New York Mets
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 45/55, Changeup: 45/55, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Molina threw in the mid-80’s when he signed at age 16 out of the Dominican Republic, then his stuff ticked up in short stints in 2013 to hit the mid-90’s. This year, he was able to showcase that stuff over full outings at age 19, sitting 91-94 and hitting 97 mph. He was a pitchability guy with a good changeup when he was a soft-tosser, and Molina has kept those elements, with his fastball and slider ticking up with the added arm speed. Molina will head to a very pitcher-friendly park in Low-A Savannah next year and scouts are predicting a big year; if the stuff ticks up just one more notch, he’ll easily be in the top 50 next year.

99. Rob Kaminsky, LHP, St. Louis Cardinals
More: Video
Fastball: 50/50+, Curveball: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Kaminsky isn’t the typical 1st round high school pitcher as he’s listed at 5-foot-11/191, but the stuff is big and there’s advanced feel to pitch. Kaminsky sits in the low-90’s, his changeup took a step forward in his first full year and his plus curveball is a now weapon that could get big leaguers out. The Cardinals have a good track record with developing young pitchers and Kaminsky is about as advanced as cold-weather bred 20-year-old arm can be, so he might move fast.

100. Jacob Lindgren, LHP, New York Yankees
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 60/65, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 45/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: The biggest surprise so far from the 2014 draft was the meteoric post-draft rise of Lindgren. In 2013, he was a generic sophomore lefty with fringy stuff starting for Mississippi State, then he asked to be moved to relief in the fall, he hit the mid-90’s with a nasty slider and never looked back. Lindgren carved up the SEC and the Yankees took him in the 2nd round. He then proceeded to carve up the minors with equally impressive numbers and he’s now knocking on the door of the big leagues with closer level stuff and just enough of the feel from his starter days to spot his hellacious slider where he wants it.

101. Clint Frazier, CF, Cleveland Indians
More: Video
Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 65/65, Game Power: 20/60, Run: 60/60, Field: 50/5, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Frazier was the most fun player to watch in the 2013 draft class, with an out-of-control red mop of hair and Gary Sheffield-level 80 bat speed that allowed him to put on ridiculous batting practice displays at his small home park. Frazier had some trouble making contact in high school against soft-tosser because it causes problems for him to try to slow down his incredibly fast hands. He had some similar timing and approach issues in his full-season debut, striking out in nearly 30% of his at bats, but flashing the same huge tools. Frazier is just fast enough to play center field and he might hit 30 homers, but he fits fine in right field if he ends up there eventually.

102. Jorge Mateo, SS, New York Yankees
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50+, Game Power: 20/45, Raw Power: 45/45+, Speed: 80/80, Field: 45/55, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Mateo was generating a lot of buzz this summer in Rookie ball for the Yankees, but he broke his finger before I was able to get out to see him. I saw him this fall in instructional league and I saw where there was so much buzz around him; he has top-of-the-scale 80 speed, has the tools to stick at shortstop, has surprising pop and was hanging with pitches three or four years older than him. Mateo still has a very short track record, so his full-season debut in 2015 will be closely watched, with a good shot Mateo moves up on next year’s list.

103. Josh Bell, RF, Pittsburgh Pirates
More: Video
Hit: 30/55, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 30/55, Run: 40/40, Field: 40/45+, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Bell was considered unsignable out of a Texas high school in 2011, but the Pirates took him in the 2nd round and signed him for $5 million, seeing a dynamic right fielder. He still probably fits best as a right fielder, so I’ll list him there, but the Pirates have three center field-caliber defenders entrenched in their lineup (Andrew McCutchen, Starling Marte and Gregory Polanco), a huge outfield that necessitates this kind of ability, and a hole to fill long-term at first base. So, since defense was never a big part of his game, Pittsburgh is shifting Bell to first and he’s still new over there, so it’s a little rough, but he should be fine. He may not be the middle-of-the-order terror the Pirates were expecting, but the bat should be enough to profile everyday at any position.

104. Brian Johnson, LHP, Boston Red Sox
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 50/55, Curveball: 50/50, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 50/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Johnson was on a loaded 2012 Florida team that included C Mike Zunino, SS Nolan Fontana, LF Preston Tucker, RHP Jonathon Crawford and LHP Paco Rodriguez, among others. Johnson had above average power from the left side and served as DH at times, but his upside was on the mound, as a pitchability lefty that flashes above average stuff. On any given day, Johnson’s stuff may be closer to average, but his feel for pitching helps it to play up; he’s likely to hit his upside as a back-end starter, but there isn’t much more in the tank.

105. Miguel Almonte, RHP, Kansas City Royals
More: Video
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 45/55, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Almonte will flash huge ability at times, sitting 93-96 mph with a plus changeup at times, but he often doesn’t have that peak combination at the same time that he has his peak curveball and peak command. He also throws from a lower slot, which means lefties can see the ball better against him than other righties and it also can flatten out his pitches at times. If Almonte can find more consistency in his delivery, that should go a long way towards correcting these issues and unlocking his mid-rotation upside.

106. Christian Bethancourt, C, Atlanta Braves
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/45, Raw Power: 50/50+, Game Power: 30/45, Run: 40/40, Field: 55/60, Throw: 80/80, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Bethancourt has long been known to scouts as a standout defender with an 80 arm, but he hasn’t had much polish to his game on either side of the ball until recently. He made strides with the finer points of his defense and finally starting putting up offensive numbers in the last couple years, giving the Braves a comfort level with letting Brian McCann leave, as Bethancourt will step in this year with the starting job.

107. Brett Phillips, CF, Houston Astros
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 40/45+, Game Power: 20/45, Run: 55/55, Field: 50/55, Throw: 70/70, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Phillips was a late-rising prep prospect in the 2012 draft as an all-county wide receiver and linebacker who emerged a standout center fielder in his draft year. He was seen as an above average to plus runner that can play center field, standing out for his plus plus arm and contact ability. Phillips took another step forward in 2014, adding strength to his frame and hitting for more power while keeping his speed. If he keeps hitting like this in 2015, Phillips will likely work his way into the middle of the top 100 next year.

108. Jorge Polanco, 2B, Minnesota Twins
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 40/55, Raw Power: 40/45+, Game Power: 30/40, Run: 50/50, Field: 50/55, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Scouts seem to slightly prefer Polanco to Herrera, as both are basically big league ready second basemen with similar tools, so they’re easy to compare. The separator is that Polanco can play shortstop if needed, so if the bat doesn’t play as much as expected, he can be a true utility player. Both have advanced bats and below average game power, so it’s basically a coin flip, but Polanco gives more defensive versatility with the same overall tools while Herrera has a better offensive track record.

109. Dilson Herrera, 2B, New York Mets
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 45/55, Raw Power: 50/50, Game Power: 40/45, Run: 50/50+, Field: 45/50, Throw: 45/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Herrera follows in the footsteps of Rangers 2B Rougned Odor as a smallish Latin second baseman that was a known quantity on July 2nd, but had to settle for a low six figure bonus due to a lack of flashy tools. Both raked their way to the big leagues as potential everyday players, so maybe teams should change how they look at this kind of guy, but even now scouts find it hard to go all-in on Herrera. His swing is funny, he doesn’t project to hit for a lot of game power and he can only play second base, but he also raked his way to the big leagues at age 20 and there’s enough here for an everyday player.

110. Kyle Freeland, LHP, Colorado Rockies
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 50/55, Slider: 50/55, Curveball: 45/50, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 45/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Freeland stood out on the Cape as a potential first rounder, then took another step forward this spring, when he was untouchable down the stretch, flashing plus stuff and advanced command. The problem is that an elbow surgery as a high school freshman contributed to big questions about his medical on draft day, with some teams telling me they wouldn’t take him in the first round at all, though Colorado took the hometown kid at 8th overall for an under-slot bonus. The mechanics aren’t great but the stuff can be at times, so it’ll be interesting to see if Freeland can stay healthy and if he can continue showing the premium stuff he did down the stretch in 2014.

111. Nick Kingham, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates
More: Video
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 50/50, Changeup: 55/55, Command: 45/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Kingham isn’t a sexy prospect, but he’s near big league ready and projects as a steady, league-average #4 starter. What I’m supposed to say now is that this kind of player is worth over $10 million a year on the open market, so this is the key, cost-controlled contributor that smaller market teams like PIttsburgh need. I guess I did say it, I’m just trying to let you know Kingham isn’t the super exciting prospect whose video you can’t wait to watch.

112. Lucas Sims, RHP, Atlanta Braves
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 50/55, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Sims was another 1st round high school pick of a local Atlanta kid by the Braves and, though he had a tough 1st half in 2014, he regrouped down the stretch and is back on track. One scout compared Sims’ talent to Matt Cain out of high school and, while the body types are different, on Sims’ best day he shows that kind of stuff. His curveball regressed a bit in 2014, but it’s flashed plus at times and the ability is there for at least average command, so mid-rotation upside is still on the table.

113. Francelis Montas, RHP, Chicago White Sox
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/70, Slider: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Montas was acquired from the Red Sox in the Jake Peavy deal in 2013 and he’s emerged as more than just a circus act in Rookie ball that hit 100 mph. Montas has steadily improved, with his average slider taking a big step forward this year to now flashing plus, his changeup is now enough to give him a starter’s repertoire and he still hits 100 mph at times. The question is whether his delivery and command fit as a starter and most think he ends up as a closer, but there’s still a chance he figures out a way to fit as a mid-rotation starter.

114. Touki Toussaint, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 50/60, Curveball: 50/60, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 35/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: I saw Toussaint pitch in his sophomore year of high school and he was very athletic, sitting 88-91 mph with a plus curveball at age 16. He blew up the following fall before his junior year, when he hit 97 mph and flashed a 70 curveball in front of hundreds of scouts at a high profile tournament. He stalled a bit in the summer before his senior year and early in his draft spring, scuffling in the low-90’s with diminished stuff and little command. He broke out later in the spring, flashing the same power stuff from before, but choosing to dial it down a notch and working in a new changeup, so he could successfully command it and get hitters out. This adjustment got Toussaint drafted in the middle of the first round, but there’s still a long way to go.

115. Kodi Medeiros, LHP, Milwaukee Brewers
More: Video
Fastball: 50/55, Slider: 55/65, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Medeiros was one of the most unique pitchers in the 2014 draft, as a skinny 6-foot-1 prep lefty from Hawaii that throws from a near sidearm angle, but hits 95 mph with an easy plus slider. Scouts weren’t sure where to rank such a unique prospect, but he steadily moved up boards into the mid-to-late first round, with a sterling pre-draft workout in Milwaukee prompting the Brewers to draft him at 12th overall. There’s mid-rotation or closer upside and it’s too early to have a good idea of what he’ll turn into.

116. Spencer Adams, RHP, Chicago White Sox
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 45/50+, Curveball: 50/55, Changeup: 45/55, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Adams is a classic multi-sport, athletic projection prospect: he sat in the high-80’s as a junior, then sat in the low-90’s and hit 96 mph in his draft spring. Scouts liked that he had four pitches and advanced feel to turn over a changeup despite playing a lot of basketball, where the 6-foot-5 Adams stood out (and dunked often). Adams has a chance to rocket up this list if his performance in pro ball matches his considerable upside and some rival teams think he’s most likely in this group to be in the top quarter of this list in a few years.

117. Luis Ortiz, RHP, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Ortiz drew Jose Fernandez comparisons from some scouts this spring, with a pre-draft elbow scare causing him to slip to the end of the first round to the Rangers. When healthy, Ortiz has consistently shown two plus pitches and all the traits you want to see from a future starter, so he’s about as close to reaching his #3 starter upside as a 19-year-old can be at this point.

118. Brad Zimmer, RF, Cleveland Indians
More: Video
Hit: 20/55, Raw Power: 50/55, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 60/55, Field: 50/50+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: This summer, Zimmer was another highly athletic first rounder out of the University of San Francisco like his brother Kyle (#93 on this list). Brad is a hitter that’s drawn comparisons to Marlins OF Christian Yelich for his long frame, deceptive speed, and contact approach. Zimmer can play a solid center field now, but likely moves to right field eventually, with further physical projection and/or adding loft to his swing potentially making him a really good starter, if he can hit for average and power in games.

119. Roberto Osuna, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays
More: Video
Fastball: 55/60, Cutter: 55/60, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Osuna signed for $1.5 million in 2011 as a 16-year-old out of Mexico. He had a mature frame and had hit 95 mph, but sat around 90 and relied on pitchability and an above average to plus changeup. He returned from Tommy John surgery late this year and his velocity jumped a couple ticks, to the surprise and delight of Blue Jays execs. He’s now sitting 92-94 and hitting 97 mph, sitting a few ticks higher in short stints, with a slider and cutter that are both above average and the same changeup as before. The command hasn’t quite come back but that usually happens in year two or three after surgery, so Osuna could shoot up this list soon.

120. Greg Bird, 1B, New York Yankees
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50+, Raw Power: 60/60, Game Power: 20/60, Run: 35/35, Field: 40/45+, Throw: 50/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Bird is indeed the word after Greg breakout 2014 season, which came on the heels of a shockingly good full-season debut in 2013. The converted catcher is first base-only, so he has to mash to be an everyday player and he doesn’t show you much power in batting practice, but really stands out in games. Bird has plus power and good plate discipline, with some comparing him to a non-injury-prone Nick Johnson.

121. Colin Moran, 3B, Houston Astros
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/55, Raw Power: 50/50+, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 40/40, Field: 45/50, Throw: 50/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Moran is arguably the most polarizing prospect in the minor leagues and I delved into why at length at the full report linked to above. The short version is that he’s an unexciting player who hits well, doesn’t have much power, is a gangly, low energy kid that, at first glance, can’t play third base. The good version is that he really hits, he has good plate discipline, there’s reason to believe the power is coming and he’s a late bloomer for upstate New York that can stick at third and has generally been young for his minor league levels, even though he went to college. Sort through all that and decide what you think; this ranking is splitting the difference on people that think he’s top 100 quality or barely a prospect worth mentioning.

122. Alex Blandino, 2B, Cincinnati Reds
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50+, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 20/50+, Run: 50/50, Field: 45/50, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Blandino hit two straight summers on the Cape but struggled during the spring with the short-sighted hitting philosophy at Stanford. He broke out in his draft year and showed more raw power, hitting his way into the first round. The Reds think he might be able to stick at shortstop and he played third base at Stanford, but most scouts have thought for years that Blandino’s best fit is at second base.

123. Jack Flaherty, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
More: Video
Fastball: 50/55, Slider: 50/55, Curveball: 40/45+, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Last summer on the high school showcase circuit, Flaherty was seen as a top-three round caliber third baseman with a super-athletic long, projectable frame and a smooth swing. Scouts knew he also pitched, but he didn’t throw over the summer and has fringy to average stuff as a junior. In his senior year, Flaherty took a big step forward on the mound, flashing three above average pitches and above average command with a clean delivery, a projectable athletic frame and limited miles on his arm. There isn’t a plus pitch right now and he hasn’t thrown a ton in the last year, but Flaherty has just about everything else going for him.

124. Duane Underwood, RHP, Chicago Cubs
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Curveball: 50/55, Changeup: 50/60, Command: 40/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Underwood was an inconsistent prep arm from Atlanta in the 2012 draft that, early in his pro career, look to be more bust than boom. He turned things around and had a breakout 2014 campaign in Low-A, flashing three plus pitches at times. Underwood still has trouble with command at time and he often only has one or two of his pitches working in any given outing, so there’s plenty of room for growth with #2/3 starter upside if he brings it all together.

125. Pierce Johnson, RHP, Chicago Cubs
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Curveball: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Johnson popped up in his draft year at Missouri State flashing above average stuff, slipping on draft day due to some concerns about his delivery, command and future health prospects. Johnson has avoided major injuries and performed well, with his above average to plus fastball-curveball combo giving him #3 starter upside, but the command and consistency have been bugaboos and he may ultimate fit best in the bullpen.

126. Lance McCullers, RHP, Houston Astros
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Curveball: 55/65, Changeup: 40/50, Command: 35/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: McCullers’ father was a big leaguer and Lance Jr. hit 95 mph as a 15-year-old at Tampa area powerhouse Jesuit High School. He’s been a high-profile name for years and the Astros signed him to a $2.5 million bonus in 2012 with some of the savings from an under-slot deal with #1 overall pick SS Carlos Correa (#5 on this list). McCullers has a nasty fastball-curveball combo that’s plus-plus on the right day and would easily make him a closer if he can’t stick as a starter.

127. Travis Demeritte, 2B, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50, Game Power: 20/50, Raw Power: 55/55, Speed: 50/50+, Field: 45/50, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Demeritte drew Brandon Phillips comparisons as an offensive standout Atlanta-area prep shortstop that projected to move to second base. He hit for power in his full-season debut, but didn’t make as much contact as you’d like to see. Demeritte has feel to hit and above average bat speed, so it’s more a matter of striking a contact/power balance. He has solid everyday tools and could move quick, but probably won’t be a star.

128. Nick Howard, RHP, Cincinnati Reds
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Howard was the closer for UVA last spring and blew away ACC hitters with a fastball he ran up to 98 mph and a plus slider. He’s a big athlete that had started the previous summer on the Cape and the Reds took him in the 1st round to turn him back into a starter. The stuff was down a notch in most outings after signing, but he showed flashes of that closer stuff in some outings as a starter. As Howard gets stretched out, if that plus stuff comes back for longer stretches, he will move up this list quickly.

129. Forrest Wall, 2B, Colorado Rockies
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/55, Game Power: 35/45, Raw Power: 45/45+, Speed: 65/65, Field: 45/50, Throw: 45/45, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Wall was one of “my guys” in the 2014 draft and I can’t believe he lasted until the 35th overall pick, with most scouts explaining it as a systematic bias against high school second basemen. Normally that would mean Wall is deficient in a tool-sense, but he only plays second base because of a shoulder surgery as an underclassman; he has legitimate mid-first round tools if he was a shortstop. The bat is above average, the power is near average, the defense is at least average and the speed is a difference maker; look for Wall to move quickly and make lots of teams feel foolish for passing.

130. Austin Hedges, C, San Diego Padres
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/40, Raw Power: 50/50, Game Power: 20/40, Run: 40/40, Field: 60/65, Throw: 70/70, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Hedges was ready defensively for the big league last year and probably would’ve been above average, too. He has some raw power and some feel to hit, but the bat speed isn’t great and his mechanics have always been a little awkward. You don’t have to hit much these days to be an everyday catcher, especially when you’re plus defensively. Hedges knows he just needs to make a little progress with the bat to become a big league starter and he’s focusing on it now more than ever.

131. Lewis Brinson, CF, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/45, Raw Power: 60/60, Game Power: 20/45+, Run: 65/65, Field: 60/65, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Brinson starts a three-player run of crazy tooled-up center fielders with enormous upside. Brinson made the best defensive play I’ve ever seen when I watched him in high school and he’s still crazy elite in this area. Brinson runs and has raw power, but he’s tall and has long limbs and is very skinny, so corralling his body into a consistent swing can sometimes be a challenge. He’s slowly made progress and could be on the verge of a breakout in 2015.

132. Derek Hill, CF, Detroit Tigers
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 50/50+, Game Power: 20/45+, Run: 80/70, Field: 55/65, Throw: 50/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Hill is the son of a Dodgers scout and the Tigers took him in the first round out of a Sacramento-area high school last summer. Hill has advanced feel to hit and to defend as you’d expect from a scout’s son, with shockingly good tools to back it up. He struggled down the stretch last summer after signing, but it sounds like he was tired from a long season; Hill has the tools to shoot up this list if he puts it all together.

133. Michael Taylor, CF, Washington Nationals
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 30/40, Raw Power: 60/60, Game Power: 30/45+, Run: 60/60, Field: 55/60, Throw: 55/55, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Taylor has massive tools and is near big league ready, but rates this low only because his approach has scouts doubting that he’ll get anywhere near his offensive upside. If he figures things out in 2015, it’ll likely be in the big leagues and he won’t be on this list next year. Even if he doesn’t improve much, Taylor’s plus speed and defensive skills should give him near everyday value, even if he doesn’t hit a lick or just leans back and tries to sock some dingers.

134. Tyler Beede, RHP, San Francisco Giants
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Fastball: 60/65, Curveball: 45/50+, Changeup: 50/55, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Beede was a hyped prospect that went in the 1st round out of high school in 2011, opting not to sign with the Blue Jays before going in the first round again in 2014 out of Vanderbilt to the Giants. Beede was maddeningly inconsistent in college, only showing flashes of his immense promise at times, but his velocity spiked into the high-90’s before the draft and his changeup still flashes plus at times, so there’s #2/3 starter upside here if a pitching coach can get through to him.

135. Luke Jackson, RHP, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 60/65, Curveball: 50/55, Slider: 45/50, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Jackson has long been seen as a reliever that’s doing an impression of a starter in the minors, but now he’s knocking on the door of the big leagues and he may have made enough adjustments to make it work. The stuff plays up in relief for 8th or 9th inning upside, but if the command takes one more step forward, Jackson may turn into a #3/4 starter.

136. Nick Williams, LF, Texas Rangers
More: Video & Full Report
Hit: 20/50+, Game Power: 20/50, Raw Power: 60/60, Speed: 55/55, Field: 40/45+, Throw: 45/45, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Williams was heavily hyped as a high school underclassmen in Texas as having Jason Heyward-type tools and while Williams isn’t quite that good of a player, the tools are close to that good. Williams isn’t interested in defense and his arm is below average, so his speed doesn’t contribute much there while his plus raw power is muted in games by his aggressive early-count approach. Williams is so talented he still puts up solid numbers, but it he can make some adjustments to his offensive approach in 2015, he could shoot up this list.

137. Ian Clarkin, LHP, New York Yankees
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 50/55, Curveball: 50/55, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 45/50, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Clarkin was the third of the Yankees three first round picks in the 2013 draft and the prep lefty from San Diego has already exceeded expectations. His velocity has settled near the high end of where it was pre-draft and his above average to plus curveball is still the separator, with his changeup and command making good progress in 2014 at Low-A.

138. Ricardo Sanchez, LHP, Atlanta Braves
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 45/50+, Curveball: 55/60, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 40/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Sanchez had a lot of good buzz in 2014 as an advanced 17-year-old pitcher in Rookie ball and he was surprisingly traded this offseason by the Angels to the Braves. Atlanta was surprised and thrilled that Sanchez was available and his solid average stuff and feel with a knockout curveball should move quickly through the minors, with his full-season debut coming in 2015 at Low-A.

139. Hunter Dozier, 3B, Kansas City Royals
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Hit: 20/50, Raw Power: 55/55, Game Power: 20/50, Run: 45/45, Field: 45/50+, Throw: 60/60, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Dozier was a late-rising big shortstop in the 2013 draft class from Stephen F. Austin. The Royals took him with an under-slot at 8th overall and those savings allowed them to take LHP Sean Manaea (37th on this list) with the first pick in the sandwich round. Dozier had tons of helium pre-draft and had a big debut, but struggled with contact issues in the second half of 2014 in Double-A. He’s a good athlete with easy everyday tools, so if the bat comes around in 2015, he’ll be close to a callup.

140. Kyle Crick, RHP, San Francisco Giants
More: Video
Fastball: 60/70, Slider: 50/60, Changeup: 45/50, Command: 35/45, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Crick has electric #2/3 starter stuff, is still only 22 and is in the upper levels of the minors, but his command has never been strong. Some guys with big stuff just take time to develop the feel and find consistency in their delivery, so the Giants will give Crick more innings to figure it out. If he has trouble developing those starter traits again this season, Crick could get a big league audition in relief and he may stick there, with real closer upside.

141. Nick Travieso, RHP, Cincinnati Reds
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 55/60, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 40/50, Command: 40/45+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: Travieso is a husky workhorse righty that flashes a plus fastball-slider combination and could turn into a #3 starter, but the consistency of his breaking ball, changeup and command will all waver at times. There isn’t physical projection left, so most scouts hedge and call him a back-end starter, but the mentality and stuff both may end up fitting better in late relief down the road.

142. Tyler Danish, RHP, Chicago White Sox
More: Video & Full Report
Fastball: 50/55, Slider: 50/55, Changeup: 45/50+, Command: 45/50+, FV: 50
Scouting Report: I didn’t believe in Danish as a high schooler in the 2012 draft class because his arm action and delivery were, to be kind, unconventional. Chris Sale’s mechanics were supposed to lead to his arm exploding, too, and that hasn’t happened, so maybe the White Sox just have a knack for finding the guys that can make this work. Danish is as competitive as they come and I think he’ll stick as a starter, but the stuff ticks up in relief, so don’t be surprised if he finds his way into the big league bullpen in late 2015 if there’s a need and a pennant race.

45+ FV Prospects (Tier of 58)

As you may have noticed from the size of the last tier, numerical rankings become nearly irrelevant at this point, as there just aren’t enough clear separations for me to take a strong stance on one player over another. So, rather than continue to order players when it adds no real value, here are the 45+ FV players — or those caught in the in-between space between 45 FV and 50 FV — presented as an extended section of guys who just missed the cut. They are grouped by team, so you can find the guys in your favorite team’s farm system who may very well be strong contenders for a full write-up next year.

45+ FV Honorable Mentions Position Team
Jake Lamb 3B Arizona Diamondbacks
Yoan Lopez RHP Arizona Diamondbacks
Manny Banuelos LHP Atlanta Braves
Tyrell Jenkins RHP Atlanta Braves
Braxton Davidson RF Atlanta Braves
Christian Walker 1B Baltimore Orioles
Zach Davies RHP Baltimore Orioles
Jomar Reyes 3B Baltimore Orioles
Garin Cecchini 3B Boston Red Sox
Matt Barnes RHP Boston Red Sox
Deven Marrero SS Boston Red Sox
Michael Chavis 3B Boston Red Sox
Dan Vogelbach 1B Chicago Cubs
Billy McKinney LF Chicago Cubs
Gleyber Torres SS Chicago Cubs
Trey Michalczewski 3B Chicago White Sox
Yorman Rodriguez RF Cincinnati Reds
Aristides Aquino RF Cincinnati Reds
Amir Garrett LHP Cincinnati Reds
Tyler Anderson LHP Colorado Rockies
Steven Moya RF Detroit Tigers
Domingo Santana RF Houston Astros
Jorge Bonifacio RF Kansas City Royals
Roberto Baldoquin SS Los Angeles Angels
Chris Anderson RHP Los Angeles Dodgers
Alex Verdugo RF Los Angeles Dodgers
J.T. Realmuto C Miami Marlins
Corey Knebel RHP Milwaukee Brewers
Clint Coulter RF Milwaukee Brewers
Tyrone Taylor CF Milwaukee Brewers
Monte Harrison CF Milwaukee Brewers
Gilbert Lara 3B Milwaukee Brewers
Lewis Thorpe LHP Minnesota Twins
Rafael Montero RHP New York Mets
Dominic Smith 1B New York Mets
Rob Refsnyder 2B New York Yankees
Matt Olson 1B Oakland A’s
Renato Nunez 3B Oakland A’s
Matt Chapman 3B Oakland A’s
Zach Eflin RHP Philadelphia Phillies
Alen Hanson SS Pittsburgh Pirates
Reese McGuire C Pittsburgh Pirates
Rymer Liriano RF San Diego Padres
Christian Arroyo SS San Francisco Giants
Edwin Diaz RHP Seattle Mariners
Austin Wilson RF Seattle Mariners
Ketel Marte SS Seattle Mariners
Randal Grichuk RF St. Louis Cardinals
Magneuris Sierra CF St. Louis Cardinals
Alex Colome RHP Tampa Bay Rays
Blake Snell LHP Tampa Bay Rays
Taylor Guerrieri RHP Tampa Bay Rays
Andrew Velazquez SS Tampa Bay Rays
Brent Honeywell RHP Tampa Bay Rays
Devon Travis 2B Toronto Blue Jays
Miguel Castro RHP Toronto Blue Jays
A.J. Cole RHP Washington Nationals
Wilmer Difo SS Washington Nationals

And finally, in case you missed them yesterday, the demographics of the Top 200 in visual form.

Top-200-Prospects-Team-Grid

Top-200-Prospects-Position

Top-200-Prospects-Distribution

We hoped you liked reading The FanGraphs Top 200 Prospect List by Kiley McDaniel!

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Kiley McDaniel has worked as an executive and scout, most recently for the Atlanta Braves, also for the New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles and Pittsburgh Pirates. He's written for ESPN, Fox Sports and Baseball Prospectus. Follow him on twitter.

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Great to see this on a snowday! Thanks so much for all the insightful work.