Looking for Evidence of a Change to the Ball

We saw an unprecedented jump in home runs in the last few years. What made it so strange was that most of it happened after the 2015 All-Star break. There is an increased awareness of launch angle and bat path, and 2015 was the first year there was a public in-game feedback, but still you would expect such an adjustment to take longer, especially since in-season swing changes are really hard to do — maybe with a whole offseason to work on it, it might have been slightly more believable.

There have been multi-factor explanations like a great rookie class of power hitters in the second half of 2015, changed approach, and other stuff like a slightly smaller zone, but really you would not expect such a multi-factor cause to happen that quickly and distinctly between two season halves. That made most sabermetric writers, including most of the FanGraphs staff, believe in a single-factor cause, most likely the ball.

There is some evidence for a changed ball, and there is also anecdotal evidence of minor-league players called up claiming the MLB ball flies farther. However, MLB so far has rejected that, and supported that with the credible name of professor Alan Nathan, albeit without really publishing the data, which further increased the suspicion.

We also did see an increase in launch angle: In 2015 in the first half, the LA of the league was 9.6, and in the second half it was 10.3, which further slightly increased in the first half of 2016 (10.4) and 2017 (10.8). The biggest jump, however, occurred between the season halves of 2015. So were the players really able to increase their LA with a single focus cue without really having much time to work on swing mechanics by just aiming higher after getting the first-half feedback? Those are the most talented athletes in the world, but still that sounds incredible.

But of course just increased elevation doesn’t explain the surge. The number of balls hit between 20 and 35 degrees (usual HR range) increased from roughly 8200 in the first half of 2015 to roughly 8600 in the first half of 2016, but the number of HRs increased from 2521 to 3082. Since less than half of the FBs between 20 and 35 go out of the park (I don’t have the exact number but I estimate 30% from the numbers I have), the 600 more batted balls in that range don’t explain 500 more HRs. That means, apart from more FBs, those also got out more, and the league saw a jump in HR/FB rate (9.5% in 2014 and 12.8 in 2016).

To research that, I looked into some Statcast stats. All stats here are just first halves of the respective seasons, because the first half of 2015 was the last “normal” HR half. Also I want to lessen weather effects.

This table shows that balls between 20 and 35 degrees do indeed fly farther and also go faster off the bat.
Average distance (20-35 LA)

2015 326 89.9
2016 331 91.6
2017 332 91.3

So does this jump in HR/FB prove a juiced ball? Not necessarily. To explain this, we have to get into swing mechanics. The attack angle is the vector of the bat’s sweetspot just before contact. Generally you can hit higher LAs (launch angles) by just hitting the bottom of the ball, but while some backspin is good, too much of it will slow down the ball. Generally the more LA and attack angle match, the higher the exit velo. That means players that try to swing up more might shift their highest velos to higher LAs. So while players couldn’t really change their swings that fast, just the intent of higher LA might have unconsciously caused a higher attack angle and thus more “flush hit” fly balls.

Evidence for the ball not being a factor is that average league EV is actually down a tiny bit. However, if the attack-angle theory is true, you would also expect that the EV of balls between 0 and 10 degrees would lower a little bit, and that hasn’t really happened.

Avg EV EV (0-10 LA)
2015 87.1 93.3
2016 87.8 93.3
2017 86.9 93.1

Another theory came from Tom Tango. He assumed that harder swinging and increased attack angles lead to higher peak EVs but also more weak mis-hits.

We do indeed see a big increase of balls hit above 105 MPH, but on the other side (and there have to be weaker hits to explain that overall EV is not up) there is an effect of more weak-hit balls in 2017, but not so in 2016.

EV >85 Balls 105
2015 96.2 19210 2960
2016 96.9 19075 3917
2017 96.7 20436 3635

To see if there is an aerodynamic effect — one theory of the juiced ball is reduced air drag due to lower seams — I looked at the average distance of balls hit at 20-25 degree LA in different velocity buckets.

EV Range 95-100 100-105 105-110
2015 366 391 415
2016 362 387 408
2017 363 391 411

You can’t really see an effect here. Balls hit at the same EV (which is measured right after exit so that air drag hasn’t done its work yet) don’t fly farther in 2016 or 2017 than they did in the first half of 2015. That means there likely isn’t really an effect of aerodynamics, at least not a big one.

So the reason for increased HRs seems to be mostly that fly balls fly faster and farther for whatever reason. We don’t see an across-the-board increase of EV, however, but simple explanations like a shift of max EVs to other launch angles don’t seem to really work either, as LAs from 0-10 (and also lower than minus 5 for that matter) haven’t really changed in their EV.

It remains mysterious what did actually happen. We do know LAs have increased some, but that doesn’t explain the whole story. But I couldn’t find real evidence for a changed ball in Statcast either. Could a super fast on-the-fly adjustment of the league between season halves based on the Statcast date really be the driving factor here?

Intellectually I really want to believe the juiced-ball theory, as it is the most elegant explanation for such a quick turnaround, but maybe it isn’t that easy.



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Kingcannsly
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Kingcannsly

Somebody needs to do brand of baseball opposed to pitchers arm injuries study….ALL THESE PITCHERS COMING FROM HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE INTO THE PRO’S AND IMMEDIATELY HURT THEIR ARMS….THAT’S MY WINTER MEETING 2 CENTS….GUYS TWEAKING THEIR ARM HARDER TRYING TO GET THE BALL TO MOVE LIKE WHEN THEY WERE AMATEURS PLAYING WITH RAISED SEAM BASEBALLS…CAZOO TOLD ME AND I JUST RELAYED THE MESSAGE