Why the White Sox Should Relocate

On opening day of this season the White Sox attracted a crowd of 37,422 in a win over the Minnesota Twins. In much contrast to their sell out crowd on opening day, their 2nd and 3rd home games drew much less people. The White Sox reported that their 2nd home game of the year was attended by 10,625 people however, there appeared to be much less people in the park then the club reported. You can decide for yourself, but there are clearly less than 10,000 people at this game and the attendance figure was probably closer to 1,000. The Sox saw very similar attendance in their 3rd home game of the season as well. These numbers are pathetic but people might argue it’s because the team is in a rebuilding stage and fans have no expectations for their team this year.

That might be part of the issue but the amount of people that have attended their games so far is embarrassing to the organization. Also, in White Sox history when the team is contending for a playoff spot they have always struggled to sell to tickets to very important games. A prime example of their woeful attendance when they are in contention was on September 25, 2012. The White Sox were tied atop the AL Central with the Detroit Tigers. With 8 games remaining in the season, the Sox were facing the Cleveland Indians in a crucial home game. Almost any other big league team would get a sell out crowd but the Sox only attracted 13,797 people which filled about a third of their stadium. These attendance figures should be very alarming to the Sox organization and show that changes of some type are needed.

Another interesting part of the Sox’s attendance problems is that offseason signee Jose Abreu isn’t helping draw crowds at all. Typically if a big name player, is debuting for a team, fans will come out to see them play. Abreu, had tons of hype surrounding him as he had shown elite power and the ability to hit for average in the Cuban league. The signing of Abreu is obviously not a publicity stunt, and is a move to improve the quality of the team. fans however, have shown no interest is seeing their potential all-star 1st baseman play. The fact that this young, exciting player is a negligible factor in whether or not fans will attend games is problematic to the franchise.

Another problem with the White Sox is that the games are fun to go to, yet people still don’t go. From first hand experience going to White Sox games, I actually really enjoy the environment there. As an fan who will go to US Cellular Field not to root for a particular team but just to watch baseball, I have always enjoyed my experiences there. The park is in very good condition and the food is unique and pretty good. The firework shows at the end of night games I have always found to be very cool and have been known to attract people to games who aren’t necessarily big baseball fans but just want to have a good time. Ticket prices aren’t unreasonably high as the average ticket cost $29 as of 2012. Going to White Sox games are an enjoyable and affordable experience yet nobody goes.

Not attracting crowds when in contention, when having high profile players, and having a quality stadium suggests that people in Chicago flat out do not care about the team at all. The organization might need to do something drastic to attract more fans. An option for the Sox that might help the organization is relocation. There are many cities that would love to have and MLB franchise and I think that Portland, Oregon would be an excellent option for the White Sox.

Portland is a city populated with just over 600,000 people similar to Seattle and Denver. Portland only has one major sports team (Portland Trail Blazers, NBA) and has shown in their attendance figures that they love and will support their team (5th in the NBA in attendance). Another notable piece of information is that the Portland Timbers the Major League Soccer franchise based out of Portland sells out every single game and attracts over 20,000 people for home games. In a very low market sport that is in the shadow of the major four sports in the USA, Portland has supported their MLS team. If Portland were to receive the Chicago White Sox, attendance figures would skyrocket and the team would be a much more relevant part of the city. The change from Chicago to Portland might be a problem with the fact that the Sox are in the AL central and Portland is dead west, but the MLB could easily realign to make things more easier in terms of travel.

Another problem people might point out is that Portland is a much smaller market than Chicago and the franchise might not make enough money. However, around the MLB the White Sox are widely considered a smaller market team as they are in the shadows of the Cubs who have a much larger fan base and is the more prominent team in Chicago. A move to Portland would allow the team to receive much more attention, and would help the organization sell more tickets. This is why Portland would be an excellent fit for the Sox and would drastically improve the state of the franchise.



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greglucas@hotmail.com
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greglucas@hotmail.com

Portland is an interesting possibility. Moving the franchise to the ALW would allow the Houston Astros to get back into the Central Time Zone. That is not as preferable to most of their fans as moving back to the NL but better than the double whammy of AL and West. I, however, am not holding my breath on this however.

garyr
Guest
garyr

I’m a Cubs fan, but I’m enough of a baseball fan and former Chicagoan (I live in Appleton WI now) to feel there are 2 main reasons this team doesn’t draw:

1. The neighborhood-yes, the areas w and s of the park are pretty good with new housing and a couple of nice sports bars-not Wrigleyville but decent, and most of the lousy high-rises have been razed. But if you wander E of the Ryan or S of the park, its still bad. If the Sox built a new park in say Naperville or Schaumburg, theyd draw 5000 more per game, IMO.

2. AL baseball is BORING. The past 5 years or so I regularly check tables of paid attendance at ballparks, and of the bottom 10, 7-9 are always AL clubs. AL games are boring without any strategy. Let the pitcher bat.

Micah
Member
Micah

Hey dumbass, old, windy afternoon games in early April don’t draw crowds anywhere.

trob
Guest
trob

not to mention that it was raining all morning and they were trying to fit one of the games “into a window” of acceptable weather.

AJP
Member

A day game during non-summer months as well. There are many factors of which the author overlooks here.

MustBunique
Member
Member

Except for the games with those conditions that did draw crowds:

(All games FRI April 4) ATL @ WAS, 1:05 PM, 55 Degrees, 42,000 Attendance; BAL @ DET, 1:08 PM, 42 Degrees, 23,000 Attendance; MIL @ BOS, 2:05 PM, 43 Degrees, 36,000 Attendance; MIN @ CLE, 3:05 PM, 46 Degrees, 41,000 Attendance; PHI @ CHC, 2:20 PM, 38 Degrees, 38,000 Attendance.

Aside from those games you are correct.

Tom
Guest
Tom

With the exception of the Baltimore-Detroit game (which did not have an impressive attendance anyway), those are all home openers. The White Sox drew 37k in their opener.

Kyle
Guest
Kyle

I live in Chicago, and can tell you first-hand the people here absolutely care about the White Sox. The biggest issue is the location of the stadium and the lack of public transportation going directly to the stadium. That’s been compounded by the city eliminating the El stop right next to the stadium for remodeling purposes. Most fans don’t live around The Cell and driving through downtown Chicago for a 7PM game is miserable.

ed
Guest
ed

they actually added transit service to the station in the form of a new metra station. i think one of the bigger problems is the fact that its located in a shady area and may not be the best place to be especially after dark. also i think more southsiders are working class types who cant go to a game night and night out at their prices

trob
Guest
trob

this isnt an excuse anymore. the neighborhood directly surrounding the park is as safe as any city neighborhood now. The lack of attendance in 2 out of 3 home games had more to do with weather and game time than anything.

ed
Guest
ed

do you mean the housing projects or the el station teeming with homeless folks and robbers?

Mike
Guest
Mike

ed, since you’ve obviously never been to Chicago to think that a train station is “teeming with homeless folks and robbers”, don’t dump on it.

garyr
Guest
garyr

So if I wonder E of the Ryan or south of the park I probably wont get mugged?

Who are you kidding?

If the Sox moved to Schaumburg, Orland Park or Naperville, they’s draw 5000 more per game easy.

LVKSox
Member
LVKSox

Bridgeport has long been perfectly safe, especially before and after a ballgame with crowds and extra police. Crime around Wrigley is actually worse statistically. And the projects you reference in your other comment have long since been torn down.

AreYouSerious
Guest
AreYouSerious

You must be kidding…Yes Bridgeport is safe but once out of it you are in trouble. I know people who went to a game last week. Asked a Cop where they could stop to pick up food for the drive home. He directed them down the road a bit and they were robbed at gunpoint while in the drive thru line. That was leaving directly after the game. Getting to and from is taking your life in your own hands. What a shame nice ballpark not a nice neighborhood. Been to Wrigley(free ticket from work)for a night game last summer and never felt the need to even roll up the windows. Big difference from one area to the other. You must work for the Sox. And no I am not a Cub fan.

Joewho112
Guest
Joewho112

The Red and Green lines go by the stadium plus a Metra line which is more than Wrigley has. Plus it has parking. There is no way in which the Cell is harder to get to than Wrigley unless you are only speaking for the frat boys in Wrigleyville specifically.

garyr
Guest
garyr

The Red Line is the most crime invested subway/L line in Chicago.Combine that with the areas E and S of the park and boring AL baseball with no strategy and there is no wonder the Sox don’t draw.

Eric
Guest
Eric

The Red Line is not the most crime invested L line in Chicago, there is more crime on the Green Line than any other line, trust me I know. And what’s with AL baseball being boring? If the AL is boring for some reason than I suppose the NL is equally as boring, if you think baseball is so boring than why watch it? And the location of the ballpark is not why the Sox don’t draw, they drew just fine in 2006 when they averaged 36,000 a game and that’s when the Robert Taylor Homes were still standing.

garyr
Guest
garyr

Here it is-near the end of the 2014 season. The Sox were 3rd from the bottom is baseball attendance-until they get out of that rathole of a neighborhood, get to a part of town or a suburb where the L or metra line isn’t the highest crime line in the city or suburbs and until they and the other AL teams drop the stupid DH which takes the strategy out of baseball and is as exciting as watching paint dry-they will draw numbers as bad as Clevelland and the 2 Florida teams.

Eric
Guest
Eric

Once again, the neighborhood isn’t the reason the Sox don’t draw. The neighborhood isn’t even a rathole of a neighborhood and what purpose would being in a suburb serve? The team is Chicago, they are known for being from the Southside, moving them to a suburb would be ridiculous. And for the second time the Red Line is not the most crime invested line on the L and Metra is hardly crime invested I think your just talking to hear yourself talk now. And really what does the AL having the DH have to do with the White Sox not drawing? In the top 10 the AL has 5 teams and the NL has 5 teams.

garyr
Guest
garyr

Sorry Eric. you are wrong.

The data I have only goes thru 2012, but a survey conducted by the CTA says without a doubt the most crime infested line and crime invested stations are on the Red Line, mostly S if Madison, except the Chicago station. Of the top 10 stations, only 1 was on the Green Line.

The neighborhood E and S of the park is bad and its one guys opinion (and I’m a Cubs fan and admittedly prejudiced, but the AL game is boring with no strategy.

You look at the 10 worst drawing teams in baseball and at least 7 are AL clubs. I don’t think that’s a coincidence.

Meet The Mess
Member
Meet The Mess

If only the White Sox still had Jack Parkman to ignite that Indians/White Sox rivalry…

Jt
Guest
Jt

As a Chicagoan and a White Sox fan this is tough to fathom. I like Portland, and I think it needs baseball. However I think you’re underestimating the Sox fan base. It’s bigger than you might think. I agree they should relocate though. But not to Portland, rather to the western suburbs. This would solve the attendance issue overnight. Their biggest problem is location. The stadium is such a struggle to get to for almost everyone in Chicagoland. The interest in the the ball club isn’t less than anywhere else, many more would go if it was easier to get to.

Mike
Guest
Mike

29 of 30 ballparks are currently in urban centers. No move to the suburbs is ever going to HELP attendance, because baseball as a spectator sport is highly urban. What the Sox need is more development around the ballpark, like bars, to draw in the casual fan.

Atlanta Braves
Guest
Atlanta Braves

I disagree

Josh
Guest
Josh

If the one team you are talking about isn’t milwaukee you are wrong about this.

Also, the cubs were seriously considering moving to rosemont. The city of chicago, along with new york and LA are large enough to support teams if a team was to move out from being directly in the city.

Jonathan boba
Guest
Jonathan boba

Do your homework. I was at game 3 and it was 33 degrees with freezing mist from inning 6 on after big rains the previous night put the game in peril. Ever been to a minor league game in Portland? I was on a beautiful summer day game that attracted about 200 fans total.

Eminor3rd
Guest
Eminor3rd

This is the worst community article I’ve ever seen

gofuckyourself jones
Guest

Go back and look at gane 2 attendance for Mariners opening hone series over the last 5-10 years. Go ahead, ill wait.

witesoxfan
Guest
witesoxfan

So a Tuesday afternoon game didn’t draw well.

Maybe you should be writing this article about Cleveland. In a year where they made the playoffs and were playing another team in contention – the Kansas City Royals – they drew crowds of 9,794, 12,615, and 12,085 for the September 9-11 series.

-It was cold
-There was the possibility of rain
-They were afternoon games in early April
-They were coming off a 99 loss season
-They were playing a bad team coming off a bad season

There are plenty of reasons why a team would actually move, but citing attendance when attendance is such a small issue in the finances for a MLB team anymore is a bit absurd, especially when your sample size is 3 games and general conjecture otherwise.

Nitram Odarp
Guest
Nitram Odarp

I’m a Cubs fan and would have no problem with the White Sox moving out of town if only so I didn’t have to deal with Sox fans who hate the Cubs more than they like their own team anymore, but everything about this article is tremendously awful, from the junior high level of writing to the complete lack of contextualization as to WHY two games in the beginning of April didn’t sell well (hint: the weather was miserable those two days and the second game was a day game). Try again.

LVKSox
Member
LVKSox

Do you really think that if the Sox moved their fans would hate the Cubs less?

bkgeneral
Member
Member
bkgeneral

Pretty much every team draws like crap during the week until summer. Then put unbearable weather with it, and you get crap attendance.

That said, I live in Cincinnati, and took my son to a White Sox game a couple years ago. While the stadium is okay, the neighborhood is not. I am shocked at the places these stadiums get placed. Washington is a horror show as well. On the other hand I found Detroit to be an excellent area, which by reputation of the cities you would not expect.

You want people to come to your games, how about putting them in a nice part of the city with plus parking and plus attractions around the stadium. The “cheap” land some of these stadiums go on, is cheap for a reason.

I AM KARL HEAR ME ROAR
Guest
I AM KARL HEAR ME ROAR

Yeah, they’ve been in the same location since they were established back in 1894.

phillipsmc
Member
phillipsmc

You should try another Nationals game. The area was definitely rebuilding when the stadium opened, but it’s revitalized considerably since. Several high profile restaurant/bar openings along the waterfront this winter, and the pre-gaming area around the stadium is a lot of fun.

MegaDouche
Guest
MegaDouche

Yeah, all stadiums should have PLUS PARKING and PLUS ATTRACTIONS. What’s that you say? Chicago is a densely populated major city, so you can’t just find a huge empty lot for a stadium and associated infrastructure wherever you want? Go away, Common Sense, that’s ridiculous. Oh, and there’s some sort of historical reason to keep the stadium in that area, perhaps relating to the more than century-old legacy of one of baseball’s earliest and most storied ballclubs? Seriously, Common Sense, fuck off. I want some PLUS ATTRACTIONS. Let’s drop the Cell in the middle of Grant Park, that shouldn’t be too difficult, amirite?

-Frustrated, Embittered, (cold) Chicagoan

P.S. take the damn train. It’s not that hard. Then you don’t have to worry about PLUS PARKING. You can soak up the sights and sounds of PLUS WALKING.

garyr
Guest
garyr

The “damn train” runs on the Red Line, which, South of the Loop, is the most crime ridden L line in Chi Town.

Move to the Grant Park or W Loop area, Schaumburg, Orland Park or Naperville and the Sox would draw 5000 more a night .

And I’m saying that as a Cubs fan.

Eric
Guest
Eric

Going to and from Sox games on the Red Line isn’t a problem at all. The station has security and unless your going to 95th or live south of the Sox-35th station I don’t know what purpose you’d have to be on the Red Line south of the loop.

Mark Primiano
Guest
Mark Primiano

Portland lost their minor league team because the city wouldn’t build them a new stadium. They aren’t getting a major league squad.

Mark Primiano
Guest
Mark Primiano

The Indians have drawn only 9K more fans this season, despite their home games all being played on the weekend, as opposed to three midday midweek games. I think we need to move the Indians to Montreal.

Derek Salm
Guest
Derek Salm

I’m not sure if I’ve suffered through reading anything worse in my life. Even overlooking the blatant lack of research put into the article on why the Sox’ attendance figures were so low, there seems to be clear viability that this ‘article’ was produced in five minutes and edited by no one. Please, please take two minutes to review this site: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/commas.htm

Furthermore,…..Portland? Did you throw a dart on a map of the US and land on Portland? And did you select a team with poor attendance for the first week of the miserably cold season openers and land on the White Sox? No clear connection at all, no compelling reasons given. Please take your time to research the history and allegiance of the White Sox and its fan base instead of taking a three game recap to present reasoning behind the move of a team that has been in Chicago for 100+ years and one of baseball’s oldest teams.

JtheExploder
Member
JtheExploder

For those who don’t want to read the entire article:

Opening day sold out and was 70 degrees.

The rest of the week’s games were scheduled during the work day in rainy weather and close to freezing temps.

Bud Selig should fast-track a proposal to move the White Sox.

Brian
Guest
Brian

Did a seven-year-old write this?

macseries
Guest
macseries

Less vs fewer bro

Book_Worm
Guest
Book_Worm

Kudos to the author for making an argument in a public forum — obviously it’s generating a lot of discussion, which is a good thing! However, I think the methodology of this article leaves something to be desired.

First, I don’t think we can say after three games at home that White Sox fans are not turning out for Jose Abreu. And furthermore, I don’t think that cherry-picking April games (the second and third games of the 2014 season) and one late September game (from 2012) make a compelling case for a team’s attendance figures. The weather in the upper Midwest certainly can dampen attendance at the beginning and end of the season.

I would d suggest that if someone wants to make an argument for relocation on attendance, that he or she should look at total season attendance, or even an average attendance per game. Here you can see that the White Sox are, indeed, a lower draw than other teams, but consistently there are five or six teams that draw even worse. Click here for attendance. That’s 2013: going back several years, it holds that they are in the bottom third of the league, never last.

LVKSox
Member
LVKSox

The most ignorant aspect of this ignorant article is questioning the reported attendance figures for Wednesday and Thursday. Baseball attendance is always reported as tickets sold. The actual number who show up may be higher or lower for various reasons. Clearly only a few thousand actually came to the park for each game. Not unusual for April mid-week games in horrible weather.

Calico
Guest
Calico

Portland can’t seem to keep their minor league teams. The so-called Portland Beavers have moved out several times since the PCL started in 1903. Charlotte would be a more viable option for the Major Leagues as they have three of the four major sports. Doubt the Sox would leave Chicago. They had in their chance 25 years ago when Tampa was an option.

Atreyu Jones
Guest
Atreyu Jones

“Ticket prices aren’t unreasonably high as the average ticket cost $29 as of 2012. Going to White Sox games are an enjoyable and affordable experience yet nobody goes.”

Apparently these things aren’t true. Their ticket prices and ancillary costs are overpriced, or else more people would go.

A $29 ticket is usually $38 (or whatever) after service fees, and then of course there is the normal huge mark-up for food, drink, etc.

James
Guest
James

White Sox have had attendance problems since the Cell opened. From a season ticket holder since 1983, the attendance now makes me a little nervous, but only for the sake that its going to significantly cut their payroll, not that they will relocate. Its funny how people seem to care so much about the White Sox’s attendance now even though from 2000-2005 they drew roughly 18,000 a game and were able to build a championship team. Also all Chicago sports draw terribly when the teams don’t do well (Cubs don’t count since Wrigley Field is a tourist attraction), Bulls between Jordan and Rose had bad attendance. Should the Blackhawks have moved in the early to mid 2000s because they had the worst attendance in the NHL for 5 straight years? Attendance is rarely the reason for a team to relocate.

Maury Brown
Guest

*Interesting* article. Beyond the exceptionally relocation issues, never look at a club’s attendance performance unless it’s anemic for extended periods. Unless 10 or more yrs, it’s not a worthy candidate. White Sox should not be discussed.

MegaDouche
Guest
MegaDouche

Congratulations, you’ve succeeded in attracting everybody’s attention, albeit for all the wrong reasons.

This page (http://espn.go.com/mlb/attendance/_/year/2013) shows the attendance by year of all the major league teams. The White Sox rank 24th, in a year in which they fielded what was probably the worst team in the AL (the Astros don’t qualify, because I don’t think they were/are a major league team). Now, that’s in the bottom 3rd and it’s not especially good, but may I remind you, that Sox team was dreadful, awful bad (as this year’s team will be as well). When the Sox do better, attendance improves. And if, when they field the worst team in their league, they only get down to 24th, I’d say that’s not bad at all.

The teams which should worry about relocating are the ones which had good seasons and still couldn’t break out of the 20s–your Oaklands, your Tampa Bays, your Clevelands. ANY OF THOSE would be more compelling candidates for relocation than a team which has prospered in the same place for literally more than 100 years.

Mackenzie P
Guest
Mackenzie P

Weak article as already mentioned by others. This is a general problem fostered by the Internet: too many people think their passing thoughts need to be shared with others. If you aren’t doing a well-researched and thought-out article, then don’t bother doing anything.

BridgeportJoe
Guest
BridgeportJoe

Portland isn’t remotely comparable to Seattle or Denver. With respect to the former, the Seattle metro area (3.5M) is roughly 75% bigger than the Portland metro area. Denver’s a bit more complicated, because it’s hard to define its metro boundaries (does that include Boulder? Colorado Springs?). But it almost doesn’t matter, because Denver is the undisputed capital of the Rocky Mountain region, especially including the Front Range (the big swath of medium-to-big sized cities that run along the eastern foothills of the Rockies — from south to north, Albuquerque-Pueblo-Colorado Springs-Denver-Boulder-Ft. Collins-Cheyenne). And with a total population just shy of 6 million, it’s hard to dispute that the region probably deserves at least one team. A comparable situation would be if Seattle didn’t exist, in which case you probably could argue that Portland deserves a team. But it does, so Portland doesn’t.

mightyflynn
Member
mightyflynn

This steaming pile of garbage is the worst thing I’ve ever read on FanGraphs.

BubbaBiscuit
Member
BubbaBiscuit

The Fangraphs Community Research section should not be used as one’s personal blog space.

Also, since it is community created content, I think the “article” itself should have the upvote and downvote buttons applied to it. I would downvote this “article” if I could. This is not something I would want added to the regular writers of articles on the main side of fangraphs.

Alex
Guest
Alex

This is far more a function of the weather than the team. Attendance levels that low would be historic, and in no way should be expected to continue. Sure, the White Sox rebuolding project probably dissuades some fans from showing, but in a city the size of Chicago, the teams shouod still muster a decent enough attendance in the interim. Although the majority of the city may side with the Cubs, that still leaves more than the entire population of Portland, not to mention Chicago has a rich baseball culture that may invoke more fans to attend games even given equal populations.

LVKSox
Member
LVKSox

Twins Opening Day Attendance: 35,837 So I guess they should move to Winnipeg.

Matthew Tobin
Member

Here is why they shouldn’t:

* They’d lose A LOT of TV Money. I’m not sure of the breakdown. But big markets get big TV money. No exceptions really.

*Attendance is a bad figure because people are attracted to winning teams. Houston has one of the largest markets in the country…and their attendance was awful in 2013. In 2006, The White Sox ranked 10th in attendance nearly tied with the Cubs. But the Cubs were also really really good.

*The White can enjoy more success, but they have to win and be a good for a while to do so. If the White Sox trotted out a 63 Win team in Portland, they’d be in FAR worse shape.

ben
Guest
ben

Like most others, I found this article and the Cubs article to be poorly written and void of insight or compelling argument.

What bothered me most, though, was Sean F’s sarcastic and argumentative responses to reader comments.

Sean, you have very little chance of becoming a professional writer, or even an amateur writer who develops a following. Your only hope is to:

— Run (don’t walk) to your local community college and take some grammar and writing courses

— Develop a thicker skin. The act of putting something out into the world – whether it’s a song, a novel, a blogpost, whatever – is to invite criticism. If you can’t handle it, find another hobby.

— Show a little class. Frankly, your responses make you seem like a douche. What’s to be gained by that.

Conor
Guest
Conor

Looks like I’m beating a dead horse here, but it’s clear very little research went into this article. The Sox will never, I repeat never, move because of the sweet deal Reinsdorf has with the city of Chicago. If season attendance for the Sox falls under 1.9 million, then the White Sox do not have to pay the city a dime of ticket fees. So when people don’t show up to the games, the Sox pay less in rent. Along with an extremely low annual fixed rent of $1.5M, the Sox have ridiculously low costs compared to other MLB teams.

Additionally, the Sox keep all concession, signage, merchandise, parking, and ticket revenue (before going over 1.9 million) which have actually made the Sox a very profitable team. Once they do start winning consistently, it will only become a more profitable business.

Uhuh
Guest
Uhuh

All the Sox fans were at a Poison/Ratt reunion concert w/Mullets flowing.

Greg
Guest
Greg

Dude…..Portland? Really?? I’m a Cubs fan, and I think this is ridiculous. The White Sox are one of the oldest franchises in baseball, in one of the top 3 markets in the United States, and you want to move them to Portland? You move the Rays to Portland, you move the Diamondbacks to Portland, you move the Nationals to Portland. You DO NOT move the White Sox (a historic franchise) to Portland. C’mon, bro.

Chris
Guest
Chris

My favorite comments reference the neighborhood. Look, it’s not Myrtle Beach meets Chi Omega frat party, but the neighborhood is very nice. There are chill bars within walking distance, and Bridgeport (and the other surrounding neighborhoods) are safe, working class places to live. Whoever references the “project” clearly hasn’t been to many projects. Yes, there is public housing south of the park. It’s very nice. I’ve been there a number of times, and it’s not a bad neighborhood. If you want to walk about 20 blocks, you might hit some places that aren’t great, but what this argument boils down to isn’t whether the neighborhood is safe or not; it’s whether it’s majority white or not. Wrigleyville is an orgy of generation x and millenial privilege. Sox park is located in a nice neighborhood – way nicer, in my opinion, than Wrigleyville. Let me put it this way. The only place I saw two guys fighting in the street with a drunk woman screaming at them wasn’t Bridgeport, it was Wrigleyville. The only time my wife got threatened by a boozed up bunch of girls on their bachelorette party riding a trolley wasn’t at sox park, it was in Wrigleyville. So let’s not talk about safety without forgetting what this is really about – race. And that plays out in the crowds, too. Go to both parks and look around. Sox park is much more diverse.

Marc
Guest
Marc

Why? It’s a CUBS town. Always has been, always will be. And they have less of a fanbase as a result. That’s why Sox fans hate the Cubs so much. They play second fiddle to the North Side.

Bob
Guest
Bob

I have yet to see anybody mention how detrimental Hawk Harrelson has been to the fan base. Sox games are unwatchable on TV as a result, even with Stone to clean up the mess. A lack of interest in the homes results in a lack of interest in the stands. People are not compelled to watch games on TV, and are often turned away by the repugnant southerner when they are brave enough to try.
Hawk would have been run out of town if he worked for any of the other major teams in the city, for some reason the Sox continue to abide his dribble; and suffer as a result.

Daquan
Guest
Daquan

How about Indianapolis? Then they could some of their very few fans and stay in the AL Central. Chicago is a CUBS town and it always will be. And the lame new ballpark doesn’t draw any crowds. If they still had Comiskey, it would bring more people to see the ballpark instead of the lousy team. Just sayin’.

Tyrone
Guest

2015 MLB Attendance Stats

Tyrone
Guest
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