My Morning in Exile

Signs you blog too much: you get angrier at a sluggish Internet connection than you would at, say, a punch in the face or an insult of your mother or something. “I only have SEVEN Firefox windows open!!! Why won’t this page load faster!!!”

  • No one wants to play for Ozzie Guillen. Ozzie Guillen doesn’t care. Neither of these things are surprising.
  • The Yankees thought about trading Rivera to the Tigers once. Thank God they didn’t, because then the world never would have known the joy of Todd Jones’ mustache.
  • Roger Clemens has suffered yet another legal setback. This is not surprising. Well, not to anyone except this wonderful NBC commenter:
  • Because Clemens tried to defend himself against the claims of Mcnamee that makes him stupid according to this clown Calcaterra? What a dumb article written by a complete idiot and this isnt the first one he’s written thats been this bad either. I ask the writer of this BS, how would you like him to defend himself? Mcnamee should be responsible for what he said and should not get any kind of protection by the feds, yet more proof the legal system is a joke.

    If you think I simply took the high road and let that stuff pass, well, you’re simply not familiar with my work.

  • Believe it or not, Manny Ramirez returning to the Dodgers presents an opportunity for the Rockies.
  • High anxiety
  • Finally, a cost benefit analysis of a players’ PED use with math and everything, though I didn’t post it for the math.
  • I’m not totally punting the rest of the day, but I will be quiet for the next couple of hours as I get caught up with other things. Check back this afternoon for more bloggy goodness.


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    David
    Guest
    David
    Craig, you finally have addressed the Clemens farce, I’m so thrilled!!! Wait a second…. ….False alarm.  Stupid defamation suit crap…. ——- (1) You’ve ragged on Rusty Hardin before.  It seems to me that, unlike many clients who are meek and wholly deferential to their attorney’s “expertise”, Clemens is very probably just going against his attorney’s advice.  After all, all that Hardin can do is advise him, right?  Do you really believe that Hardin advised him to speak before Congress?  To call ESPN Radio when the matter was all-but-forgotten by the public? So do you have inside information that Hardin is… Read more »
    Craig Calcaterra
    Guest
    Craig Calcaterra
    David—While I acknowledge that you’ve been imploring me to write about the Clemens/perjury thing, my reluctance to do so isn’t based on an actual disagreement with you as much as it is based on the fact that, technically and literally speaking, the jury is still out as to whether there will be a prosecution (that you assume is not going to happen).  The grand jury I mean. And I while I’ll grant that the longer the jury goes without returning an indictment, the less likely it is that one will never come, I don’t think it’s (yet) accurate to say… Read more »
    David
    Guest
    David
    Craig: Any response is a good one! I thank you for not reflexively playing a contrarian on the Bonds matter, and I can understand your holding judgment on the Clemens matter (although I think that it might be appropriate to set some arbitrary deadline for the feds). And I agree with you 100% that the government has no business sticking its fat, violent face into the pro sports business…. ….But when a man perjures himself before Congress – no matter how silly the reason he was summoned there in the first place – he must be prosecuted.  “Just think of… Read more »
    Hizouse
    Guest
    Hizouse

    I really like the alliterative “clown Calcaterra.”  I’m going to store that away for future use.

    Kevin S.
    Guest
    Kevin S.

    David, Giambi and Bonds hardly gave identical testimony.  Giambi fessed up and admitted to doing it (in court, that is).  Bonds tried to wiggle around with whether or not he knew what he was taking.  Look, I agree they never should have been testifying, and I agree the government’s prosecution of Bonds is a miscarriage of justice, but by not playing games, Giambi didn’t even give the government a chance to toy with the notion of prosecuting him for perjury.

    David
    Guest
    David
    Mike S: I’ve found the article I mentioned earlier regarding Giambi’s testimony.  Giambi stated the specific drugs which he used, but evasively described them as an “alternative to steroids”.  (But that might not’ve been evasive; again, these drugs were NOT classified as steroids at that time!) http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news;_ylt=Ap2Kp9WPZkNtwkZVLkXVLJZhOJB4?slug=li-giambi020209&prov=yhoo&type=lgns “Giambi testified that Anderson told him the designer drug also allegedly used by Bonds known as the Clear was “an alternative to steroids” that would not show up on a drug test. Giambi added that he had not seen any proof that the Clear made him stronger. “I mean, there wasn’t anything miracle… Read more »
    David
    Guest
    David
    Kevin S: Last winter, a news agency – I’m pretty sure it was Yahoo – posted quotes (possibly even transcripts) of grand jury testimony, including Bonds, Benito Santiago, Jason Giambi, and I believe a few others. Side by side, there was almost no difference between anybody in their testimony.  They all played dumb (who knows….maybe it wasn’t even playing; the drugs that they were taking were not even classified as steroids by the government at that time, so if the government didn’t classify them as steroids, why the hell would the ballplayers on the stand?) and used very similar words. … Read more »
    David
    Guest
    David
    Way back in early 2006 – back when Bonds was still glowing from MVP awards and the praises of sabermetricians everywhere – the ‘San Francisco Chronicle’ wrote an article about why perjury in general – and the charges against Bonds, especially – were very hard to prosecute. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/04/15/MNGN5I9OUC1.DTL A few highlights: “You usually don’t have a confession saying, ‘I lied,’ ” Little said. If someone charged with lying about steroid use “thought it was human growth hormone, or a magic elixir, or if he didn’t know what it was, that’s not enough. … There’s no duty to inquire.”….He said the… Read more »
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