Visual Baseball:  Introducing Bat Slicer

Happy Friday. Here’s something new that I’ve been working on. It’s called Bat Slicer and the idea is to visually represent a hitters’ bat. I’m hoping the visuals are fairly self explanatory, but just in case: We start with strikeouts (represented by a hole in the bat, and then show walks, singles, doubles & triples, and home runs in successive rings. These stats are based on production per plate appearance, with a minimum of 200 PA’s, and then converted into percentile rankings, with 100% being the best, 0% the worst. The legend on the bottom right of the visual gives you a sense of scale. Click here to see a slide show of lots more players.

Let’s start with a player who’s bat we’d expect to look pretty fearsome.

imageimageHere’s a guy who is doing some serious damage, albeit with a lot of strikeouts.

imageimage


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Kevin Dame is a writer and visual designer who brings sports information to life in new and meaningful ways. Visit his website and follow him on Twitter @kevintdame.
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Erik
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Erik

Pretty cool stuff, here.

Jason461
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Jason461

That’s pretty neat, though I’m not sure I see the point in having only one kind of out incorporated.

Jon Weisman
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Jon Weisman

This reminds me in a funny way of playing All-Star Baseball as a kid in the ‘70s – the playing card were circles.

Dave Studeman
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Dave Studeman

Very neat, Kevin.  I can’t decide if I like the percentile approach—perhaps a linear weighted approach would be better.

dfan
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dfan
I have a few issues with this but the biggest one is that the area occupied by home runs (say), which is what someone’s eye will pay attention to, has only a passing correlation to the number of home runs the player actually hit. It’s proportional to (XP+HRP)^2 – XP^2 = HRP^2 + 2 * XP * HRP, where HRP = homer percentile and XP = all other percentiles added up. So not only are you 1) showing people a percentile rather than a real number (this by itself is not so terrible and could even be useful), 2) you’re… Read more »
Kevin Dame
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Kevin Dame

I played with weighted data but found that the visuals didn’t look different enough.  That’s the main reason why I go with percentile rankings so often…

Jim C
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Jim C

I like it a lot visually. You need some special work in the center for guys caught with corked bats.

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