Ticket prices are going down

The Yankees are lowering some ticket prices next year. So are the A’s. I’m sure others will follow.

That sound you hear is every hack sports writer changing their annual “tickets are too expensive” groan fests into “these changes are welcome, but tickets are still too expensive” groan fests.


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APBA Guy
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APBA Guy
As far as the A’s fans are concerned, the price reductions are long overdue. Attendance is down to nearly 10,000 a game lately, despite perfect weather. The drop, from roughly 16,000 last year reflects two bad years of overall team performance with little likelihood of playoff baseball in 2010, a lack of name recognition, unease about the team’s future (Las Vegas A’s?), and the natural consequence of Lew Wolfe continuously bad-mouthing the Mausoleum while accomplishing nothing by way of alternatives. In 1998, when I first started watching the A’s live, the best seats behind the dugout were $ 22. This… Read more »
Flynn
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Flynn
I think the A’s are in a little bit of trouble. They’ve got renewed stiff competition locally in the face of the Giants. They have a horrible stadium which has deteriorated in terms of maintenance over the last five years. They aren’t getting people to show up even for Red Sox/Yankees games, as the rather stiff prices they are charging to sit in an epic dump with an artificially low capacity – a terrible idea – keep casual fans and fans of the other team from coming, which impacts the A’s bottom line. And most importantly, the team is crap… Read more »
Bob Tufts
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Bob Tufts

It’s better to reduce your seat prices and attract fans than give seats away, which makes those who actually bought tickets feel used (see WNBA).

All teams at some point will adjust seat prices up to the last minute in order to act like hotwire (the Giants are almost there) in order to at least get someone in the stadium to park, buy merchadise and food.

Michael
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Michael
Most MLB teams actually held their ticket prices down up until the early- to mid-90s: US inflation historically increased at a higher rate. The past 10 years has really been a period of adjustment, aided by the replacement of almost all ballparks. Yankees excepted, the MLB ticket market is what economists would call “efficient.” Some people get angry when they can’t afford to seat their family of 4 in the front rows of box seats, but that’s not a right they’ve ever had (or arguably one they should have – keep those kids safe!). MLB fans who find good sightlines… Read more »
Michael
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Michael
Oh, and re: the A’s, their fan base has proved itself over the course of many decades to be the very definition of “fair-weather.” I’ve always had a good time when I’ve visited that park. Yes, it’s old. Yes, the A’s got screwed by Al Davis. But while it’s not AT&T Park, as someone who lived with the Kingdome I can tell you it’s hardly the end of the world to have easy transit access and relatively inexpensive seats in a park that while not optimal, is by no means decrepit. And an “artifically low capacity” only comes into play… Read more »
Flynn
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Flynn
They never reach that capacity because people do not go to the games they want to go to, because they think tickets are gone. The A’s have discouraged walkups, which is a huge part of their ticket base. These people by and large have not turned into advance ticket buyers and the A’s have not found how to replace them. For example, from 2003-2005 the A’s averaged 38,647 for a game versus the Red Sox or Yankees. From 2006-2008 they averaged 31,446. All of these visits came early in the season, so the A’s didn’t even have the excuse of… Read more »
The Rabbit
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The Rabbit
“All teams at some point will adjust seat prices up to the last minute in order to act like hotwire (the Giants are almost there) in order to at least get someone in the stadium to park, buy merchadise and food.” Absolutely correct.  I’m on the e-mail list of many major league teams.  I can get great seats and super packages (even for contending teams) a week before the games. I can almost always get box seats at 1st or 3rd that includes a decent buffet, all beverages, and other goodies under $50 in St. Louis, the most convenient major… Read more »
Richard in Dallas
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Richard in Dallas
When the Ballpark in Arlington opened in 1994, I was there on openeing day, 16 rows from the field in the first section on the outfield side of the third base dugout.  Had it not been a rainy day, I’m sure I would have had the tase of dirt in my mouth whenever someone slid into third.  The face value of that ticket was $16.00.  That same seat today brings $80.00 at the box office, plus a whole lot of made up charges.  For the $16.00 that prime seat cost 15 years ago, you can now sit in the bleachers,… Read more »
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